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upon the 23d of Feb’ry mr Adams addrest a Letter to you, and inclosed a private Letter from my Son at St Petersburgh to me, requesting a return of it by the next Mail. as the Letter has not been received I presume in the multiplicity of buisness, It has been forgotten. You will oblige me by sending it, and at the same time do me the favour to forwarding the packet which accompanies this Letter...
I have this day the pleasure of your Letter of April 10th with the inclosure. The intelligence you have been pleased to communicate to mr Adams, and to me, occasion many reflections in my mind. But with respect, to the path of Duty before me, I have not any hesitation. Early taught to relinquish all personal considerations and enjoyments, at the call of my Country, Surrounded with a young...
I have your favor of the 5h. and shall pay due attention to the same. In two days from this shall be ready to proceed to sea, I am still of opinion, the ship will not get away before this day week. Should you wish to send any Dispatches or messengers by setting out Imedy. they will be in time, should it be your wish, I can proceed with my ship to Gottenburg (while my return passengers are...
I thank you for your favour of the 15th, and the able Report of the Committee of foreign relations, and a very conciliatory Bill for the regulation of Seamen &c. I call it conciliatory, because in Theory it Should appear to be So; and because I believe it was sincerely intended to be so. The views were upright and the Motives pure, which produced it, I have no doubt. But will the present...
Permit me to introduce to you Mr Ticknor and his Lady. This Gentleman is a Professor at our University in Cambridge, and one of the most conspicuous Literary Characters in this State, he has been for several years intimately acquainted with Mr Jefferson, and is highly esteemed by him. I believe he has been acquainted with Mr Madison he proposes to visit Montpelier as well as Montecello in the...
I have received, Letters from my Family at St. Petersbourg, at two Several Times, under the Seal of The Department of State, and honoured with the Frank of your Name. I ought to have acknowledged the first by the return of the Post: but I hope you will excuse that omission and Accept my Thanks for both at once. I wish you Sir, in your important and difficult office, all the Honour, Comfort and...
I thank you for the frank and friendly communication in your kind letter of the 19th. of the Arrangement for the Negotiations at St. Petersburg. I have no Objection to make to it. The Points of Rank and Ettiquette, of Such vast acknowledged importance in Europe, and felt by every Man in America to be more consequence here than any Man will acknowledge; are So unsettled in this Country, that I...
As you have many Years to live, and are likely to have Buissness enough to do with your Countrymen as long as you live: I Shall claim a merit rather than make an Apology for introducing to you George Ticknor Esqr a Schollar, a Lawyer and a Gentlemen very greatly esteemed in this northern Region. Knowing the imensity of your Burthens at this time I have no wish to increase them: but knowing...
From the tenderness of Friendship and the Weakness of Compassion and humanity, I have promised two Gentlemen to mention their names to you, as Candidates for Mr Daltons late Office, Captain Tucker and Mr Deblois. A Friendship of forty Years with the former, and of fifty Six years with Mr Dalton have deeply interested my Feelings in behalf of both these Gentlemen. But what Signify Feelings when...
I ought not o have delaid an acknowledgement of your favour of February 20th. and the Volume of the Journal of the Federal Convention which attended it—The Volume shows that our present inestimable Constitution cost the Venerable Characters who composed it—much anxiety, debate, and difficulty—But a Candid and liberal disposition on all hands resulted in the—“preclarum singulare quiet”—which we...