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From the tenderness of friendship, & the weakness of compassion & humanity, I have promised two gentlemen to mention their names to you as Candidates for mr Daltons late office. Captain Tucker and mr Deblois. A friendship of 40 years with the former & of 56 years with the mr Dalton have deeply interested my feelings in behalf of both these gentlemen. But what signifies feelings when I know...
I should ask leave without scruple to transmit the enclosed letter to you were it not for the foolish compliment in it to my pretended influence, which you know to be unfounded & therefore may pass over with a smile. I do not hesitate to comply with his request, by enclosing a copy of a letter, I wrote to Mr Madison, on the 2nd. February 1813 nor scruple to say that no opinion or sentiment in...
All our intelligent Travellers to Washington, I find have an ambition to See both the present, and future President of the United States. I beg leave to introduce to you Colonelt William Sumner and his Sister, Miss Elizabeth Sumner, Children of our late Governor Sumner. Col Sumner has not only the Advantages of the best public Education at Colledge, and the Bar, but of many years service in...
Permit me to introduce to your Acquaintance and civilities Benjamin Beal Junr. Esqr., a Son of my next Neighbour. This young Gentleman has been educated at our University and to the Law in the Practice of which he has Spent Some years but finding the Multiplication of Professors in proportion to the diminution of the Business, he has thought proper to turn his Attention to travail and to trade...
I thank you for The Copy of The Presidents Message, and for the Volume of Documents. They do great honour to The President, to his Ministers and Ambassadors: and I rejoice in the Appearance of unanimity they have produced in Congress and in The Nation: which not withstanding all the apprehensions representations and Threats of Divisions, is greater than I have ever known in America for fifty...
In the good old English Language of your Virginian and my New England Ancestors, I am right glad to See you in the oldest Plantation, in old Massachusetts, next to Salem, where you will be recd with more Splendor and I hope with equal Cordiallity. MHi : Elizabeth Smith Scrapbook; Smith-Townsend Family Papers.
Your favour of the 10th. of this month has laid me under very great Obligations to you. No intelligence could be more agreable to me, than the information, that the conduct of my Son has the entire approbation of The President. As a public Man I have no views for him, but to such Services as The President Shall assign him. As a private person, though his absence and the loss of his Society is...
I have to thank you for the Presidents message, and for a pacquet from our fellow Citizen La Fayette. I have also the honour to enclose a letter from C H Robbins, in favour of his brother. There Robinses, are Sons of our once Lieutenant Governor, now Judge of Probate. They are respectable people & have respectable connections. You probably know mr Forbes. There may be many applications from...
Had I not been poisoned by the mephytic effluvia of blossoms and roses to Such a degree as to deprive me of the Sight of letters and the feeling of a pen: I Should have long Since acknowledged the honour of your obliging letter of the thirteenth of the month. It is perfectly Satisfactory to me, and it ought to be So and I presume will be So to Dr Waterhouse. I am hapy to hear that your heal t...
Had I not been poisoned by the mephytic iffluvia of blossoms and roses to such a degree as to deprive me of the right of letters and the feeling of a pen: I should have long since acknowledged the honour of your obliging letter of the 13th of the month. it is perfectly satisfactory to me and it ought to be so and I presume will be so to Dr Waterhouse. I am happy to hear that your health is...
I have the honour of your Letter of the 27 Ap. accompanied with one from St Petersbourg, for which, as well as for another which I received Sometime Since; and neglected to acknowledge, I pray you to accept my thanks. I am Sorry you had a moment’s uneasiness on account of the Accident you mention. I wish you had read the whole letter, not for any information in it, but to make you Smile at the...
Will you please to accept a morsel of rusty Antiquity, which I know you cannot and ought not to be read, because your time is imperiously demanded for occupations more important to your Country and Mankind, as well as to yourself. Your learned, and Ingenious Son-in Law Mr Hay, may possibly have a curiosity to look into it—to him I pray you to present my Respectful Complements.— And believe me...
Permit me to introduce to you Mr Ticknor & his Lady, this Gentleman is a Professor at our University in Cambridge and one of the most Conspicuous Literary Characters in this State, he has been for several years intimately acquainted with Mr Jefferson and is highly esteemed by him I believe he has been acquainted with Mr Madison, & he proposes to visit him Montpelier as well as well as...
Does History or Experience, afford an Example, of Such a Phenomenon, as this, now exhibited to Mankind, by our pious, virtuous and patriotic American Republick, whether We view it as a federative Republick, or whether We consider the Single and Simple Parts that compose the whole? The dread, of Taxes, to which all Mankind have a natural Antipathy; the hatred of War, which is Stronger in the...
Another application has been made to me by Mr Elbridge Gerry, the oldest Son of the late Vice President, for a recommendation to the office of Surveyor in Boston. How can I recollect, the laborious Services, the great Sacrifices of a Gerry for forty years, and the destitute Circumstances of his Widow and Children, without Emotion. I told him I had mentioned the Names of Tucker and Deblois;...
Although, our good old Massachusetts, has encore quelques Prejuges; yet I find that all our liberal minded Men have a Strong desire to See our past present and future Presidents. They hesitate not to ask me for Introductions; and I hesitate not to give them; knowing as I do the past, present and future President to be as liberal Men as themselves. They all return So full of Gratitude for their...
Of the multitude of applications to me for Letters of Introduction and recommendation to the President and Heads of departments, in favour of candidates for Office, I have for a long time Sternly, and Sometimes almost cinically refused them all. But the enclosed letter from Dr Waterhouse has so tenderly affected me that I cannot resist my feelings and Inclination to transmit it to you. I...
For the last twenty years I have made it a rule to interfere as little as possible with public affairs. but an occation now presents in which I think it my duty to make a frank, a Candid, a Submissive representation to you—if the Treaty with Spain returns ratifyed there will be commissioners appointed to adjust the claims for Spoilations on our Commerce—there is a Gentleman who I recommend to...
I ought not to have delaid an acknowledgement of your favour of February 20th. and the Volume of the journal of the Federal Constitution Convention which attended it—the Volume shows that our present inestimable Constitution cost the venerable Characters—who composed it—much anxiety and debate and but a Candid and liberal disposition on all hands, resulted in the “preclarum singulare...
On Saturday I received the letter your Excellency did me the honor to write me on the 11 of this month, informing me that the Legislature of Virginia by a law passed in 1798, authorized its chief magistrate to cede to the United States the Marine hospital at Norfolk on condition they pay to the contractor, the ballance which was then due him, by the commissioners under whose authority he had...
At the risk of incurring the anger of my husband, and under the apprehension of your displeasure; I am obliged by the ties of nature which are more powerful than either of these circumstances however painful, to solicit your aid and compassion for my Sister, whose situation fills me with alarm and dread. Mr: Boyd who was formerly at the head of the wa Pension Office, in a moment of anguish at...
Yours of the 12th. Inst. accompanying my commission as Comptroller of the Treasury was received by the last mail. I am not insensible of the high honor done me by this very unexpected mark of confidence on the part of the President. The circumstance of its being so entirely unexpected & out of the range of all my past calculations, will I trust be thought sufficient to justify me in asking a...
I was peculiarly anxious to have communicated freely with you before I left Washington relative to the situation of our lower country. But I was hurried from Washington so as to deprive me of the opportunity of calling. Permit me now to call your attention to that subject. The situation of the Northern neck is familiar to you that of the other necks namely Gloucester and Hampton is simular....
Knowing it an indispensable duty I owe, our beloved Cuntry at this momentous period, (and equally due from every good Citizen) to make every effort for her defence aganst the Stratagems of, both Foren, & domestic foes, and to give information of approaching dangers: Permit me to make the following communication, as lately made known to me by an inteligent gentleman now present, (but will leave...
29 August 1813, Baltimore , “ Spanish Consul’s Office .” “On my return home from a little excursion I had the honor to receive the letter you was pleased to address me under date of the 19th. inst. inclosing copies of one from the Collector of Savannah and another from the prize-master of the British Schooner Maria; who with other Citizens of the United States, is detained at the Havana; in...
§ James H. Blake to James Monroe. 31 December 1813, Washington. “In consequence of the Death of Col. George Gilpin, the office of Judge of the Orphans Court in the County of Alexandria—has become vacant. “I have been requested to communicate to you, for the information of the President, that Col. Francis Peyton of that place would accept the appointment. “Col. Peytons high & respectable...
As you were pleased to say to our Senior, at the interview he had the honor to have with you on Saturday last, that you would take into consideration, and give an early answer, to the proposal he made to you, of trying our claim on the United States, for the ship Allegany and our part of her Cargo, lost at Gilbraltar in their service, in the form of an amicable Suit, in one of the Courts of...
I observed in the National Intelligencer a letter addressed to me from Comdre. Chauncy, dated August 10th. My answer to this letter has not been published. This omission on the part of the Comdre. or his friend has induced me to send you a Copy of my reply with a request that it may appear in the paper selected by the Secretary of the Navy, With high respect, Your very humble Servt. Your...
I trouble You with reluctance, knowing how occupied You must be. I coud not promise myself attention from any other head of a Department. I had a letter on Saturday from the Man who has the Superintendance of my Estate; he informs that the Enemy are Committing great depredations near my property; that the formerly well and comfortably settled Island of Great St Simons, which produced so...
21 January 1813, New York. “Several persons, neutral foreigners, as well as Americans, whose private affairs require their presence in England have applied to us to procure them passages, and having now in this Port a very fine ship lying idle, we ask permission to send her to England as a cartel to be commanded by our Cap. Joseph Skinner and Cap N. Willis or one of them.” Remark that the...
In my last I promised to advise you of the result of the Voninteer Expedition from East Tennessee United with the troops of the United States that march against the Semenolia Indians after a march of near Seven hundred miles with out being retarded by Ice Snow hammocks or Marshes which afforded the Enemy great Oppertunities for advantague we arrived at Paynes Town in the Lochway Settlements...
My Several communications by Doctor Stevens were under dates of the 25th. to the 30th. January inclusively, and I had the honor of adressing to you copies by Mr Doolittle with a letter introductory of him—on the 11st. [ sic ] Inst. Both these Gentlemen, according to last accounts—must be now about putting to sea the first from Nantes—the latter from L’Orient. From the high approbation lately...
I have just recd. a letter from Genl Floyd (which I enclose for your perusal) giving an account of the transactions which have lately taken place at Amelia Island under the Auspices of Genl Mathews. From this account, the affair is worse than I had expected. The veracity and intelligence, & I may add, the patriotism of the writer, exclude the idea of misrepresentation, or mistake in the...
Although I am very sensible that any request of mine will have but little weight with the President I think it my duty to request you to inform him that I am in possession of property to a large amount belonging to Citizens of the U. States & that, as it is impossible to realize its value at the present moment, I fear it will be difficult to remit it in safety without some naval force to...
I have transmitted to you lately copies of my correspondence with Mr Morris; I had intended to have accompanied these with some observations on the character of that gentleman’s agency, & of his qualifications, drawn from his communications & from those which have reached me unofficially & indirectly, but was restrained by an apprehension that I might possibly have formed my judgement too...
Doctor Francis Le Barron, the Apothecary General of the army, apprehending his office to be abolished by Law, has applied to me requesting a statement of his past duties & services, and I take pleasure in doing him justice. I found him a regimental surgeon of long standing and equal at least in merit to any gentleman of his standing. Great complaints had been made of medicines & hospital...
1 June 1812, Washington. “I have invented a new method of constructing and throwing a Bomb Shell upon which the resistance of the atmosphere will be so small as that the shell may be sent three times the distance, which the same quantity of Powder, would send a common one; & with much the greater accuracy as it flies thro’ the air on the principle of a rifle Ball. I am fully convinced that I...
3 August 1813, New York. “I hope it will not be considered as trespassing too much on your time, again to solicit the favor of you, to use your influence with the President, to obtain for me the Command of one of [the] Regiments to be raised for the defence of this City. I think I can with confidence say, that such an appointment, would be very generally acceptible to the Citizens of all...
Supposing that it would not be uninteresting to you to hear something relative to the unfortunate Sufferers in Fort Principe, from Florida, I take leave to enclose to you herewith, the answer of the Captain General to my note on that subject; written in conseguence [ sic ] of a letter recd. from Governor Claiborne, in behalf of those unfortunate men. His Excellency the Captain General, does...
I request to be informed whether the paper numbered V dated Philadelphia the 15 of December 1792 published partly in the fifth and partly in the sixth number of “The History of the United States for 1796” and having the signatures of James Monroe, Abraham Venable and F A Mughlenberg is the copy of a genuine original. I am Sir   Yr. humble servt ALS , Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress. For...
In my opinion the idea of a personal affair between us ought not to have found a place in your letters or it ought to have assumed a more positive shape. In the state to which our correspondence had brought the question, it lay with you to make the option whether such an issue should take place. If what you have said be intended as an advance towards it, it is incumbent upon me not to decline...
I send you the paper which Mrs. De Talleyrand & De Beaumez were to hand you through me. You observe they have foreborne to insert any but females. The object, I am sure, will interest your good offices, as far as shall consist with your situation & with propriety. I confirm to you what they say on the subject of money. With good wishes, consideration, & esteem I remain, Sir Your obed ser ALS ,...
I have your letter of this date. It gives me pleasure to receive your explanation of the ambiguous phraze in the paper No V., published with your signatures and that of Mr Venable, and your confirmation of the fact, that my explanation had been satisfactory to you. You express your surprise at the contents of a paper in the Gazette of the U. States of the 8 instant. If you will review that...
In a pamphlet lately published entitled “No V of the History of the United States for 1796 &c” are sundry papers respecting the affair of Reynolds , in which you once had an agency, accompanied with these among other comments—“They (certain attacks on Mr Monroe) are ungrateful, because he displayed on an occasion that will be mentioned immediately, the greatest lenity to Mr. Alexander...
In my last letter to you I proposed a simple and direct question, to which I had hoped an answer equally simple and direct. That which I have received, though amounting, if I understand it, to an answer in the negative, is conceived in such circuitous terms as may leave an obscurity upon the point which ought not to have remained. In this situation, I feel it proper to tell you frankly my...
The obtaining of Information concerning the point, to which these Papers relate, is of material importance to this Department and to the public service & as such is particularly recommended to the attention of Mr. Monroe. The late Secretary of State wrote to Mr. Morris on the subject but I know not whether the papers got to hand. ALS , MS Division, New York Public Library. This letter concerns...
On reflection, I deem it adviseable for me to have Copies of the several papers which you communicated to me in our interview on Saturday evening, including the notes, and the fragment of Mr. Reynolds’ letter to Mr. Clingman. I therefore request that you will either cause copies of these papers to be furnished to me, taken by the person in whose hand writing the declarations which you shewed...
Mr. Hamilton requests an interview with Mr. Monroe at any hour tomorrow forenoon which may be convenient to him. Particular reasons will induce him to bring with him a friend to be present at what may pass. Mr. Monroe, if he pleases, may have another. AL , University of Rochester Library. For background to this letter, see the introductory note to Oliver Wolcott, Jr., to H, July 3, 1797 . See...
A resolution long formed to act with deliberation in any case which should involve the extremity, to which I am now driven, has occasionned me to defer my reply to your letter of the first instant. Though I have it in my power completely to satisfy any candid mind, that I never give a shadow of cause for the resentment you avow; yet the indelicate doubt of the veracity of my representation to...
The intention of my letter of the 4th instant, as itself imports, was to meet and close with an advance towards a personal interview, which it appeared to me had been made by you. From the tenor of your reply of the 6th, which disavows the inference I had drawn, any further step on my part, as being inconsistent with the ground I have heretofore taken, would be improper. I am Sir   Your humble...