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I have duly recd. yours of the . I considered the advertisement of your estate in Loudon as an omen that your friends in Virginia were to lose you. It is impossible to gainsay the motives to which you yielded in making N. Y. your residence, tho’ I fear that you will find its climate unsuited to your period of life and the State of your health. I just observe and with much pleasure, that the...
I have recd. yours of the 7th. You will not doubt that our sympathies have been fully with you during the afflictions which have befallen you. I think you have done well in chusing your present situation, & for the reasons you express. I hope you will experience from it all the improvement which your health needs, and every advantage promised by it. My fear is that the Winter may be too rude...
Yours of the 15th. was brought to me from the post=office, Mr. Watson having passed on without calling as you expected him to do. We lost therefore the information he was to give as to your health & that of your family Your silence favors the hope that it has improved. Let us have a proof however under your own hand. My health was again interrupted whilst I was at University, and I am yet not...
I have not heard a word from you or of you thro’ any Channel, since my letter of the . I augur favorably from this silence, as to your health, and hope to see you here by the 7 or 8th. of the approaching month. I am anxious for your attendance at the Meeting of the Visitors,(on the 10 th. of July), who will have sundry interesting matters before them, particularly the appointment of a...
I have just recd. yours of the 13th. We had been led to hope that your health was better established than you represent it. As it is progressive and your Constitution, tho’ like mine the worse for wear, has remains of good stamina, I will not despair of the pleasure of seeing you in July, and making a visit together to the University. Should prudence forbid such a journey, I think you ought...
The Nat. Intelligr. of the 19th. gave us the pleasure of finding that you had arrived at Washington in safety, and advancing in convalescence. We left Richd. full of anxiety, produced by the reported effect of what happened to the Steamboat, on your feeble condition I hope this will find you at Oakhill with continued improvement in yr. health and happy in that of Mrs. Monroe & all around you,...
I recd. yours of the 10th. with a full sense of your kindness in taking so much interest in my health. Subsequent to your call on me, I had a return of fever which reduced me to a state of greater weakness than I had before experienced. For several weeks passed, have been on the recovery in strength as well as health; and if no relapse takes place, I may be able to give my attendance at...
I have this moment recd. yours of the 25th., and having a casual oppy. to the P. O. this evening shall get an answr. into the mail tomorrow morning. The 10th. of July is as you suppose the day for the Meeting of the Visitors, and I shall look for you here in due time. It ought to be on the 8th. at the latest. I am glad to find you so successful in overcoming the successive attacks on your...
I have just recd. yours of the 31st. Ult. inclosing letters recomending Mr J. T. Tracy, and hasten to correct an error you have fallen into which affect[s] the University as well as yourself. It is on the tenth , not the fifteenth of July, that the Visitors are to meet. I address this to N. Y. where you will probably have arrived. It gives us pleasure to find that Mrs. M encounters the...
I have just recd. yours of April 28. I think as you do, that it will be best for us to decline attending the election in this Month, even in our own Counties; and I shall do so, unless it should appear that such a course will be particularly offensive. Of this there is not the least probability. On the contrary the public indications are, that elections on this extraordinary occasion ought to...
Yours of the 24th. just recd. has relieved us from the great anxiety we were suffering from the rumours of your illness. We had heard of the accident from your horse, but had also of your recovery from it. Mr. Giles makes use of the Hudibrastic gun, which does most harm by its recoil, it is said; with this difference indeed, that his cartridges being blank, the only possible effect, in the...
On the rect. of yours of the 5th. I wrote immediately to Mr. Trist, to forward you a copy of the Resolution you wish. Not having yet recd. the circular transcript of the Proceedings of the Session, I could not furnish one myself. I have desired Mr. Trist also to authenticate to you the day for the next meeting of the Visitors; for which my recollection assigns, the first day of October. You...
I have already apprised you of your mistake of the day for the meeting of the Visitors, which is the 10 th not the 15th. of July. I now wish you to know that we propose to pay a visit to Col: Lindsay, on our way, and on the following day, another. This will make it necessary to set out on Monday the 8th. You must not fail therefore to be here on the saturday or sunday preceding, and as much...
I have just recd. yours of the 31st. Ult. inclosing letters recommending Mr. Tracie, and hasten to correct an error you have fallen into which affects the University as well as yourself. It is on the tenth not the 15th. of July that the Visitors are to meet. I address this to N. York where you will probably have arrived. It gives us great pleasure to find that Mrs. Monroe encounters the...
Yours of Feby. 23. was not recd. before the last mail tho’ having the Aldie post mark on the day of its date. Whether it was not duly forwarded, or was so long overlooked at the office here is not known. The latter was probably the case. We hope the agreeable information you gave of Mrs. Monroe’s convalescence has been justified by, her entire recovery. I need not now say that I recd. at the...
Your two letters of the 13 & 15th. inst came together by the last mail (Sunday evening) too late to be answered by its return on Monday morning. I had recd. the printed circular of Judge Brooke notifying our Electoral nominations, on thursday last, but in the night, and not to be answered by the return Mail, which passes our post office, between 5 & 6 miles distant, by day light. The printed...
Yours of the 29th. Ult: was recd. by the last mail. I have not yet heard from Judge Brook, but may perhaps do so by the mail of this evening. The task imposed on us by the Convention is of so delicate a nature, that with their foreknowledge of our purpose, it ought to have been forborne. Your idea of alluding to the advantage of having the experienced Counsel of Ex. Presidts. in trying...
I recd. by the last mail yours of the 18th. You were not more surprized than I had a right to be at seeing our names on the Electoral Ticket. After my letter to you, which you made known to Col. Mercer, I wrote to Mr. Cabell in the most decided terms, and he informs me he made the proper use of it. I have a letter from Col. Mercer also, corresponding doubtless with his to you. The awkwardness...
I have recd. yours of the 10th. and return the correspondence between Col Mercer and yourself. Your letter to him of the 10th. was perfectly à propòs, and can not fail I think to answer my purpose as well as yours; the substance of it being applicable to both, and coinciding with the promise of Col. M. in his letter of Novr. 12. to guard me as well as you from the threatened embarrassment. It...
Yours of the 1st. inst: came on slowly. I return the letter from Mr. Ingersoll whose continued drudgery in his profession, would be to be lamented, if his release from it would ensure such fruits of his literary pen, as one of his discourses to the Society, Philosophical (I think), which contained the ablest & most valuable Tableau of the Condition of the U. S. that has been published. I...
Mr. Jesse B Harrison of Lynchburg offers himself as Successor to Mr. Long in the professorship of Antient Languages; and if satisfied, by the concuring opinions of the Visitors, separately expressed that he may expect the appointment, intends to embark immediately for Germany at his own expence, in order to avail himself of the peculiar opportunities there afforded for improving his...
Yours of the 2d. postmarked the 6th of November came duly to hand. I return the letters & papers inclosed in it. The fact stated to Mr. Ringold by Genl. Jessup, does not concern only or principally the question between Genl. Jackson & Mr. Southard. It belongs to the History of the Campaign and of the Administration; and as such ought to be verified & preserved. The General must of course have...
Yours of the 3d. instant, with copies of your two letters to Judge White now returned, were not received till they had made a trip to Montpellier in Vermont; as happened at the same time to three letters from our co=visitors of the University. The letter to you from Mr. Ringold, referred to as inclosed, was omitted. Your explanatory communications to Judge White are very important, and I hope...
I have recd. a letter from H. Lee dated Nashville Aug. 24. stating that he had corresponded with Genl. Armstrong on the subject of the provisional order to Genl. Jackson of July 18. 1814, authorizing him on certain conditions to take possession of Pensacola; which order was not recd. by the General till on or about the 14th. of March 1815; and then open, and the envelope without postmark; and...
Since we left the university I have recd. the letter from Mr. Gallatin, of which the inclosed is a copy. It gives no prospect of a supply for the vacant chair from that quarter, and I have no additional information from any other. A few lines from Mr. Ringold as he passed thro’ the neighbourhood, mentioned that you had suffered a sharp attack after you reached home not unlike mine, but was,...
Among the names which are presented for consideration in filling the vacant Chair in the University is that of Thomas H. Levins, now of New York, formerly of the District of Columbia, where he was Professor of Mathematics in the College. Letters in his favor are recd. from Mr. Calhoun, Genl. McComb, and Mr. A. H. Powell who I suppose is the present Member of Congress of that name. Whatever be...
Your two letters of Jany. 17 & 22. were duly recd. I hope your health was restored as soon as was promised by the decrease of your fever, and that it continues to be good. I inclose a Circular required by the resignation of Mr. Key, to which I have nothing to add on that subject. Our Colleagues protest against a "Called Board" on any acct. tho’ I fear the Creditors of the University will be...
It is proper that I should lose no time in apprizing the Visitors of the University that the resignation of Mr Key has been tendered, as authorized, and accepted as required, by the resolution of the Board on that subject. He is very desirous at the same time, that it may not take effect till the middle of August, which will give him the opportunity of being present at the examination of the...
I recd by the last mail a letter from J. H. Causten, accompanied by a huge volume of Documents, and a stout pamphlet of arguments, with a printed letter to him from Mr. Pickering, on the mercantile claims agst. France and the release of her from them by the U.S. All these articles have been doubtless sent to you also, as I am requested by Mr. C. to forward the inclosed Certificate of Agency,...
Inferring from the silence of the Newspapers, since they announced your appointment as a visitor of the University, that your answer did not require a replacing one, I take for granted that you will be with your colleagues at the legal place & period. Allow me to count on your being thus far on your way in time for us to proceed hence together. I propose to set out on saturday after next, and...
The use you have made of my letters needed no apology. they were in fact public in their nature. had not my memory so totally left me, I have no doubt I might supply from that source whatever may be defective in the extracts you have made, for altho’ I cannot say I recollect the actual fact, yet from my knolege of myself I am conscious that a compliance with your request to return home was so...
I have duly recieved your two favors of Feb.23. and 27. and am truly sensible of the interest you so kindly take in my affair, and of the encoraging aspect of mr Gouverneur’s letter. all that is necessary for my relief is a succesful sale of our tickets, of which the public papers give good hope. if this is effected, at a reasonable value for what I shall sell, what will remain will leave me...
Your favor of the 13 th was recieved yesterday. your use of my letter with the alterations subsequently proposed, needs no apology. and it will be a gratification to me if it can be of any service to you. I learn with sincere affliction the difficulties with which you have still to struggle—mine are considerable—but the single permission given me by the legislature of such a mode of sale as...
Your favor of Jan. 15. is recieved, and I am entirely sensible of the kindness of the motives which suggested the caution it recommends. but I believe what I have done is the only thing I could have done with honor or conscience. mr Gilmer requested me to state a fact which he knew himself, and of which he knew me to be possessed. what use he intended to make of it I knew not, nor had I a...
Your favor of the 2 d was rec d on the 16 th inst. together with the herb which accompanied it, and I am much indebted for the kind interest you take in my present indisposn, as also to mr Hooe & mr Buchner for their frdly attentions. I have submitted the plant to the inspection of D r D. my physician who recognises in it what is called Agrimony, with the use of which he is not unacquainted in...
The last Mail brought me your favor of the 13th. with a copy of your message and other documents. The message previously sent had arrived by the preceding mail. It contains much excellent matter; and as the last of your periodical communications will be the more interesting. The U.S. are now furnishing models & lessons to all the world, a great, soon to be the most hopeful portion of it, is...
I have examined my letter of Jan. 13. 1803. as well as the indistinct copy given by the copying press permits. in some parts it is illegible. the publication of the whole of the 1 st paragraph would merit very serious consideration as respects myself. written when party passions and contests were at their highest, and expressing freely to you with whom I had no reserve, my opinion of the views...
Permit me to introduce to you Mr Ticknor & his Lady, this Gentleman is a Professor at our University in Cambridge and one of the most Conspicuous Literary Characters in this State, he has been for several years intimately acquainted with Mr Jefferson and is highly esteemed by him I believe he has been acquainted with Mr Madison, & he proposes to visit him Montpelier as well as well as...
Permit me to introduce to you Mr Ticknor and his Lady. This Gentleman is a Professor at our University in Cambridge, and one of the most conspicuous Literary Characters in this State, he has been for several years intimately acquainted with Mr Jefferson, and is highly esteemed by him. I believe he has been acquainted with Mr Madison he proposes to visit Montpelier as well as Montecello in the...
The moment, my dear friend, is come which I was so anxious should happen in your time. the office of P.M. in Richm d is become vacant by the long expected death of the incumbent, and I cannot omit to urge my former suits in behalf of Col o Peyton. in the several cases in which I have been forced to hand to you the names of sollicitants for office I never suffered my wishes to go beyond the...
I have just had the pleasure of receiving yours of the 2d. instant. We had looked for the greater pleasure of giving a welcome about this time to you & Mrs. Monroe, understanding from Albemarle that you were to be there in a few days. We are very sorry for the uncertainty you intimate; but still hope that Mrs. Ms. health will not only permit you to make the journey, but her to join you in it....
I inclose you a letter from Thomas Lieper, the Doyen, you know of the genuine republicans of Pensylva, who, on the prospect that the Director of the mint is about closing the term of his life, wishes that Doct r Patterson son of the Director, could be appointed his successor. my testimony in his favor is not from personal acquaintance, but from the information of others which is very highly in...
I have duly rec d your favor of the 12 th inst. and concur in every sentim t you express on the subject of mine of the 2 d they were exactly what I should have said to you myself had our places been changed. my lre was meant only to convey the wishes of the party, and in few cases where circumstances have obliged me to communicate sollicitns have I ever suffered my own wishes to mingle with...
My friend Col o Peyton, passing thro’ Washington on a trip to the North, will pay his respects to you with this letter. he is the same for whom I have heretofore sollicited you, and still sollicit you to keep him in mind for either of the two offices in Richmond which may first become vacant. I shall hope a fortnight or three weeks previous notice of your visit to this neighborhood that I may...
I took the liberty some time last fall of placing mr Duane your notice, should any thing occur adapted to his qualifications, and to his situation, which I understood to be needy in the extreme. his talents and information are certainly great, the services he rendered us when we needed them, and his personal sacrifices and sufferings were signal and efficacious, and left on us a moral duty not...
I have just recd. a letter from Mr. Stone, wch. I inclose as the shortest mode of making his wishes known to you. As you are well acquainted with his character, I need say little on that head. He has been unfortunate in his mercantile career, as I presume you know; but has not suffered I believe in a moral point of view. He is certainly a man of excellent understanding, of gentlemanly manners,...
Your favors of Mar. 27. & April   came duly to hand. You know already that I submit the recommendations which I can not sometimes decline, in entire subordination to your view of the comparative merits & pretensions before you. I think you perfectly right in not allowing locality to give exclusive claims to offices of general concern. I did not forget the name of Dr. Torrey, when in...
I recieve mr Livingston’s question through you with kindness, and answer it without hesitation. he may be assured I have not a spark of unfriendly feeling towards him. in all the earlier scenes of life we thought and acted together. we differed in opinion afterwards on a single point. each maintained his opinion, as he had a right, and acted on it as he ought. but why brood over a single...
My known respect for the public & personal worth of Dr. Richard Field has led to a wish from his friends that I would make it known at a moment when his name will be before you as a candidate for a Collectorship. I must apologize for any intrusion in such a case; but in speaking of Docr Field I can not say less than that from every thing I have known or believe of his character, he is well...
A very near friend of Mr. Stone of Fredg. who is not ignorant of my having on former occasions testified my regard for his worth & his welfare, is very anxious that I should bring him again to your view. It seems that Mr. Stone has turned his thoughts & his hopes to the vacancy lately produced by the death of Col. Freeman; and the application to me has a more immediate reference to that...