You
have
selected

  • Recipient

    • Monroe, James
  • Period

    • Jefferson Presidency

Author

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 2

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Recipient="Monroe, James" AND Period="Jefferson Presidency"
Results 1-30 of 176 sorted by date (descending)
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
Your favor of the 18th. was recieved in due time, and the answer has been delayed as well by a pressure of business as by the expectation of your absence from Richmond. the idea of sending a special mission to France or England is not entertained at all here. after so little attention to us from the former, & so insulting an answer from Canning such a mark of respect as an extraordinary...
Since writing my letter of yesterday it has occurred to me that the stile in which, in my letters to you, I have spoken of the mass of falsehood & calumny afloat in our country, & the impossibility of believing what is beyond the evidence of our own senses, is too strong to be published. such a fellow as Cobbet, abusing us as a nation, will quote this as testimony of it given by ourselves. the...
Such was the accumulation of business awaiting me here, that it was not till this day that I could take time to look into my letters to you. as my copies are with the Polygraph I can refer to the originals in your hands by the page and line. letter of Feb. 18. 1st. paragraph to be omitted, being merely of private business. pa. 1. l. 22. perhaps the word ‘old’ may be misunderstood, & therefore...
I recieved your letter just as I was going to bed last night and being to set out early this morning I have only had time to read your letters to mr Randolph & that of mr Giles. the former are exactly such as I ever believed you had written. they contain nothing unworthy of the purest virtue, & altho’ the views you entertained of the conduct of the Executive towards you were not such as any...
Your favor of came duly to hand, accompanied by the papers now returned, and by a note on the correspondence communicated to Congs. It appears that in most instances the parts allotted for publication coincide with your wishes. In the excepted instances, an attempt will be made, to have the confidential parts, conformed also to these, by being included in the publication ordered by the H. of...
I was mistaken in supposing Alexander Baring arrived. it is Charles Baring, not connected in Business with the other. your letter therefore must be to A. Baring as in London, and if you can send it to me by duplicates we can use one in England, & the other in France. Affectionate salutations DLC : Papers of James Monroe.
An indisposition of periodical head-ach has for some time disabled me from business, and prevented my sooner acknoleging your letter of Mar. 22. and returning that of Feb. 2. ’06. which it inclosed. the reciept of that of Mar. 22. has given me sincere pleasure. conscious that I never felt a sentiment towards you that was not affectionate it is a great relief to find that the doubts you had...
I recd last evening your favor of the 26. and now inclose the promised list of the communications to Congs. which gives as much information as can be done in that form. Where Extracts were made, they generally extended I believe to nearly the whole of the letters, it being intended that the residue should be reduced as much as motives of prudence & delicacy would permit. On examining the...
In the joint letter from you & Mr. P. of October a project on impressments is referred to which does not appear. I forget what passed with you in conversation on the subject. You will oblige me by dropping me the state of the case, and if there be any document in your hands that you will be so good as to forward it or a copy of it. It can if necessary be thrown into the mass which will be...
I duly recd your favor of the 5th. and with it your observations, addressed to the Dept. of State, on the subject of the Treaty of Dcr. 1806: which will be communicated to Congs. with the documents relating to the negociations &c connected with the Treaty; it being understood that such a disposition of the paper will conform to your wishes. Mr. Rose’s mission is abortive. Communications on the...
I some days ago made a remittance to mr Jefferson with a request that he would pay you the amount of Jones’s bill with the costs and other disbursements. for these last he would have to ask your information as they were not stated on the bill. with this, be so good as to accept my thanks for the attention you have paid to this commission, and the trouble it has given you. from Your letter of...
You informed me that the instruments you had been so kind as to bring for me from England would arrive at Richmond with your baggage and you wished to know what was to be done with them there. I will ask the favor of you to deliver them to mr Jefferson who will forward them to Monticello in the way I shall advise him: and I must intreat you to send me either a note of their amount, or the...
I recd. last night your favor of the 3. and lose no time in forwarding the papers which it requests. I am sorry that they have been so long delayed; but in truth our hands have been so full in one way or other of late, that the transcripts which were to be taken for the office, could not be readily attended to. I am not sure that there may not yet be some omissions, & must therefore ask the...
Hoping that a post note on Norfolk will be cash in Richmond, I enclose one for $300, instead of committing bank notes to the mail. Nothing has occurred since you left us worth detailing to you. We are still uninformed of the precise circumstances which have detained Mr. Rose on board the frigate. There is a report that he will either pass up the bay to Annapolis, or possibly engage a vessel to...
I inclose for your information copies of the letters which have passed on several subjects between Mr Erskine and the Department of State; and which it may be useful for you to possess. The proceedings at Halifax with respect to one of the men taken from the Chesapeake, and whose restoration was included in the demand of reparation for that outrage, are calculated to inspire great distrust of...
Your letter of April 25th. inclosing the British project of a Convention of limits, and your proposed amendments, has been duly received. The following observations explain the terms on which the President authorizes you to close and sign the instrument. lst. The modification of the 5th. Art. (noted as one which the British Commissioners would have agreed to) may be admitted, in case that...
Since the communications by the Revenge which sailed on monday last, nothing very material has occurred. The British squadron, on receiving the Proclamation, fell down to the capes, near which (in Lynhaven Bay) several of the same or substituted ships remain. It is not known whether any orders have been recd. from the Admiral relative to their conduct under the Proclamation. They continue to...
Since the event which led to the Proclamation of the 2d. inst. the British squadron has conducted itself in a continued spirit of insolence and hostility. Merchant vessels arriving and departing, have been challenged, fired at, examined and detained within our jurisdiction, with as little scruple as if they were at open sea. Even a Revenue Cutter conveying the Vice President and his sick...
The documents herewith inclosed from No. 1 to No. 9 inclusive explain the hostile attack with the insulting pretext for it lately committed near the Capes of Virginia by the British ship of war the Leopard on the American Frigate the Chesapeake. No. 10 is a copy of the Proclamation issued by the President, interdicticting in consequence of that outrage, the use of our waters and every other...
I have not written to you by mr Purviance because he can give you vivâ voce all the details of our affairs here with a minuteness beyond the bounds of a letter, and because indeed I am not certain this letter will find you in England. the sole object in writing it is to add another little commission to the one I had formerly troubled you with. it is to procure for me a ‘machine for...
Altho’ it is not certain that this will find you in London, I cannot commit to Mr. Purviance the official dispatches without a few private lines. It has been a painful task with the President to withold from the joint work of yourself & Mr. P. the sanction which was expected; as it has been to me, to communicate the event with the considerations which produced it. I console myself with an...
In my letter of March l8th. to the joint Commission, it was signified that in a Conventional arrangement on the subject of Boundaries, it would be inconsistent with the views of the President, to open any part of Louisiana, to a British trade with the Indians. From the evident solicitude of the British Government on this point, it is highly probable that the determination of the President will...
My letter of March 18th. acknowledged the receipt of your dispatches and of the Treaty signed on the 31st. of December, of which Mr Purviance was the bearer, and signified that the sentiments and views of the President formed on the actual posture of our affairs with Great Britain, would without any needless delay, be communicated. The subject is accordingly resumed, in this dispatch, with...
In my last letter of 26. I enclosed you a copy of one from Mr. Erskine communicating the British order of Jany 7th., and of my answer. Occurring circumstances and further reflection on that extraordinary measure, produced a return to the subject; and another letter was added to the first answer. A copy is inclosed, with the same view which led to the last inclosure. The more this order is...
Mr. Erskine has presented, by instructions from his Government, a communication of the late British order against the trade between the ports of France and others therein described. With a copy of that, I inclose one of the answer given to the communication. It will not only put you in possession of what will be transmitted by Mr Erskine to his Government, but also of the sentiments of the...
A copy of the treaty with Gr. Britain came to mr Erskine’s hands on the last day of the session of Congress, which he immediately communicated to us; and since that mr Purviance has arrived with an original. on the subject of it you will recieve a letter from the Secretary of state of about this date, and one more in detail hereafter. I should not have written but that I percieve uncommon...
You will receive herewith a letter for yourself & Mr. P. acknowledging the receipt of your communications by Mr. Purviance, and suggesting the intermediate course to be pursued, untill the further instructions contemplated by the President can be matured. The delay will be short; but it is desireable to accomodate the instructions to the result of some enquiries as to certain facts, and the...
Your dispatch of Jany. 3d. with the Treaty signed Decr 31 with the British Commissioners, were safely delivered on the 15th. inst. Your letter of Decr. 27, notifying the approach of that event, had been previously received, in time to be included in a communication of the President to Congress then in Session. A copy of the instrument in its actual form, with the declaration of the British...
I have the honor to recommend to your attention the case of Messrs Francis and Charles Bradbury, explained in the enclosed document, in order that you may aid them in regaining the proceeds of the sales of their property at Buenos Ayres, if the suggestion of their having passed into the hands of the British, at the capture of the place should prove to be well founded. I have the honor &c. DNA...
By Capt. Brewster, who, with his son and two Pilots, are about to proceed to England as Witnesses in the case of Capt. Whitby, I send you copies of several of my last letters. He will also be the bearer of a letter from the Collector of New York stating the advances made to the Witnesses respectively. Two other Witnesses are expected to sail from Philada., to whom it was found necessary to...