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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Monroe, James" AND Period="Adams Presidency"
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The newspapers furnish you with the articles of common news as well as the Congressional. you observe the addition proposed to be made to our navy, and the loan of 5. millions opened at 8. percent to equip it. the papers say that our agents abroad are purchasing vessels for this purpose. the following is as accurate a statement of our income & expence, annual , as I can form, after divesting...
Dr. Bache having determined to remove to our neighborhood, informs me he has written to you to purchase lands for him. a day or two before I left home mrs Key sent me a message that the lands on which she lives & her son Walter’s were for sale. I therefore inclose you a letter to her, informg her that I have communicated it to the gentleman here whom I had under contemplation when I spoke to...
Yours of the 7th. has this moment only reached me. Having but a little time got back from a Visit to Hanover, & being in the vortex of Housebuilding in its most hurried stage, I have not been able yet to read thro’ the arrears of Newspapers accumulated during my absence. A glance at the paper you allude gave me a sort of enigmatical impression, favoring however the idea rather of a masked...
You will have this from Mr. Reuben Chuning, who wishes to consult with you on the subject of your Housebuilding. He is one of the Workmen whom I recommended to you, and will I am persuaded justify all I have said in his favor. He has not yet put the last hand to my work, but will probably be ready as soon as you are for commencing yours. I have met with some mortifying delays in finishing off...
Your favor of yesterday was duly delivered by your servant; and I herewith inclose the copies you request, of the papers formerly transmitted to me. The originals I shall forwd. to Mr. D. as you suggest. I send also your letter to Van Staphorst & his answer, which I found with the other papers & which may possibly be of use now or hereafter in refreshing your memory or otherwise. The other...
Yours of Apr. 8. 14. & May 4. & 14 have been recieved in due time. I have not written to you since the 19th. Ult. because I knew you would be out on a circuit, and would recieve the letters only when they would be as old almanachs. the bill for the Provisional army has got through the lower house, the regulars reduced to 10,000. and the volunteers unlimited. it was carried by a majority of 11....
I wrote you on the 5th. inst. and on the 12th . I inclosed you a copy of the instructions & communications from our envoys. in that of the 5th. I acknoleged the receipt of your last at hand of Mar. 26. the impressions first made by those communications continue strong & prejudicial here. they have enabled the merchants to get a war-petition very extensively signed. they have also carried over...
I wrote you last on the 21st. of Mar. since which yours of the 26th. of March is recieved. Yesterday I had a consultation with mr Dawson on the matter respecting Skipwith . we have neither of us the least hesitation, on a view of the ground, to pronounce against your coming forward in it at all. your name would be the watchword of party at this moment, and the question would give opportunities...
The public papers will present to you the almost insane message sent to both houses of Congress 2. or 3. days ago. this has added to the alarm of the sounder and most respectable part of our merchants, I mean those who are natives & are solid in their circumstances & do not need the lottery of war to get themselves to rights. the effect of the French decree on the representatives had been to...
I have to acknolege the receipt of yours of Feb. 12. 19. & 25. at length the charm is broke, and letters have been recieved from our envoys at Paris. one only of them has been communicated, of which I inclose you a copy with the documents accompanying it. the decree therein proposed to be passed has struck the greatest alarm through the merchants I have ever yet witnessed. as it has not been...
I recieved yesterday by mr Giles yours of Jan. 27. and am well pleased with the indications of republicanism in our assembly. their law respecting the printer is a good one. I only wish they would give the printing of the laws to one & journals to another. this would secure two, as each portion of the business would be object enough to a printer, and two places in their gift would keep within...
The calls of my carpenters & the fineness of the weather have induced me to hurry my waggon up for the nails. It will receive the few articles which you have been so good as to offer from the superfluities of your stock; and which circumstances will permit me now to lay in: towit 2 table cloths for a dining room of abt. 18 feet; 2. 3 or 4. as may be convenient, for a more limited scale, 4...
A resolution long formed to act with deliberation in any case which should involve the extremity, to which I am now driven, has occasionned me to defer my reply to your letter of the first instant. Though I have it in my power completely to satisfy any candid mind, that I never give a shadow of cause for the resentment you avow; yet the indelicate doubt of the veracity of my representation to...
I communicated to Mr. M. the evening I was with him the papers you sent by me for Mr. D. He was clearly of opinion nothing further ought to be done. D. was decisively of the same opinion. This being the case then there was no ground for consulting L. or B. and accordingly nothing has been said to them. Your book was later coming out than was to have been wished: however it works irresistably....
As I do not send expressly to the post Office on the return of the Mail from Charlottesville your favor of the 10th. did not get to hand in time to be answered on friday last. It is perfectly convenient for me to furnish a draft on Philada. having kept the little fund there as an appropriation to your use. The bill I offered you for 250 dollars was delivered to Mr. Jefferson with a view to go...
I like your second title better than the first because it [is shorter.] I should like the following better than either. ‘The Foreign affairs of the US. during the years 1794. 5. 6. laid before his fellow citizens by J.M. their late M.P. to the republic of France.’ The reason of my preference is that it implies no inculpation of the Executive. Such an implication will determine prejudiced men...
I have recd yours of the 15th. and according to its request inclose back the pamphlet to Mr. Jefferson. I have looked over attentively the parts of it which regard you. It does not seem to me to present any ground on which you could resume the controversy with Col. H. with an appearance either of obligation or propriety. All the points deserving attention which grew out of the course of the...
The doubt which you suggest as to our jurisdiction over the case of the grand jury v. Cabell, had occurred to me, and naturally occurs on first view of the question. But I knew that to send the petition to the H. of Represent. in Congress, would make bad worse, that a majority of that house would pass a vote of approbation. On examination of the question too it appeared to me that we could...
The intention of my letter of the 4th instant, as itself imports, was to meet and close with an advance towards a personal interview, which it appeared to me had been made by you. From the tenor of your reply of the 6th, which disavows the inference I had drawn, any further step on my part, as being inconsistent with the ground I have heretofore taken, would be improper. I am Sir   Your humble...
[ New York, August 8, 1797. Letter listed in dealer’s catalogue. Letter not found. ] ALS , sold by John Heise, Syracuse, New York, 1921, Catalogue S5, Item 9.
In my opinion the idea of a personal affair between us ought not to have found a place in your letters or it ought to have assumed a more positive shape. In the state to which our correspondence had brought the question, it lay with you to make the option whether such an issue should take place. If what you have said be intended as an advance towards it, it is incumbent upon me not to decline...
Your letter of the 25 instant reached me yesterday. Without attempting to analize the precise import of your expressions, in that particular, and really at a loss for your meaning when you appeal to my knowlege of a determination to which you say you should firmly adhere, I shall observe, in relation of the idea of my desiring to make the affair personal between us, that it would be no less...
I have maturely considered your letter of yesterday delivered to me at about Nine last and cannot find in it cause of satisfaction. There appears to me in the first place an attempt to prop the veracity of Clingman by an assertion which is not correct, namely that I had acknowleged all his previous information to be true. This was not & could not be the fact. I acknowleged parts of it to be...
In my last letter to you I proposed a simple and direct question, to which I had hoped an answer equally simple and direct. That which I have received, though amounting, if I understand it, to an answer in the negative, is conceived in such circuitous terms as may leave an obscurity upon the point which ought not to have remained. In this situation, I feel it proper to tell you frankly my...
Your letter of yesterday in answer to mine of the same date was received last night. I am sorry to say, that as I understand it, it is unsatisfactory. It appears to me liable to this inference, that the information of Clingman had revived the suspicions which my explanation had removed. This would include the very derogatory suspicion, that I had concerted with Reynolds not only the...
I have your letter of this date. It gives me pleasure to receive your explanation of the ambiguous phraze in the paper No V., published with your signatures and that of Mr Venable, and your confirmation of the fact, that my explanation had been satisfactory to you. You express your surprise at the contents of a paper in the Gazette of the U. States of the 8 instant. If you will review that...
I send herewith an answer to the joint letter of Mr. Mughlenberg and yourself. It appears to me on reflection requisite to have some explanation on the note of January 2. 1793 with your signature and It may be inferred, from the attention to record the information of Clingman therein stated after what had passed between us, that you meant to give credit and sanction to the suggestion that the...
Mr. Hamilton requests an interview with Mr. Monroe at any hour tomorrow forenoon which may be convenient to him. Particular reasons will induce him to bring with him a friend to be present at what may pass. Mr. Monroe, if he pleases, may have another. AL , University of Rochester Library. For background to this letter, see the introductory note to Oliver Wolcott, Jr., to H, July 3, 1797 . See...
I request to be informed whether the paper numbered V dated Philadelphia the 15 of December 1792 published partly in the fifth and partly in the sixth number of “The History of the United States for 1796” and having the signatures of James Monroe, Abraham Venable and F A Mughlenberg is the copy of a genuine original. I am Sir   Yr. humble servt ALS , Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress. For...
In a pamphlet lately published entitled “No V of the History of the United States for 1796 &c” are sundry papers respecting the affair of Reynolds , in which you once had an agency, accompanied with these among other comments—“They (certain attacks on Mr Monroe) are ungrateful, because he displayed on an occasion that will be mentioned immediately, the greatest lenity to Mr. Alexander...