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    • Hamilton, Alexander
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    • Monroe, James
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    • Adams Presidency

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Documents filtered by: Author="Hamilton, Alexander" AND Recipient="Monroe, James" AND Period="Adams Presidency"
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In a pamphlet lately published entitled “No V of the History of the United States for 1796 &c” are sundry papers respecting the affair of Reynolds , in which you once had an agency, accompanied with these among other comments—“They (certain attacks on Mr Monroe) are ungrateful, because he displayed on an occasion that will be mentioned immediately, the greatest lenity to Mr. Alexander...
“That they regretted the trouble and uneasiness which they had occasionned to me in consequence of the Representations made to them—That they were perfectly satisfied with the explanation I had given and that there was nothing in the transaction which ought to affect my character as a public Officer or lessen the public Confidence in my Integrity.” AD , The Library, Lehigh University,...
I request to be informed whether the paper numbered V dated Philadelphia the 15 of December 1792 published partly in the fifth and partly in the sixth number of “The History of the United States for 1796” and having the signatures of James Monroe, Abraham Venable and F A Mughlenberg is the copy of a genuine original. I am Sir   Yr. humble servt ALS , Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress. For...
Mr. Hamilton requests an interview with Mr. Monroe at any hour tomorrow forenoon which may be convenient to him. Particular reasons will induce him to bring with him a friend to be present at what may pass. Mr. Monroe, if he pleases, may have another. AL , University of Rochester Library. For background to this letter, see the introductory note to Oliver Wolcott, Jr., to H, July 3, 1797 . See...
I have your letter of this date. It gives me pleasure to receive your explanation of the ambiguous phraze in the paper No V., published with your signatures and that of Mr Venable, and your confirmation of the fact, that my explanation had been satisfactory to you. You express your surprise at the contents of a paper in the Gazette of the U. States of the 8 instant. If you will review that...
I send herewith an answer to the joint letter of Mr. Mughlenberg and yourself. It appears to me on reflection requisite to have some explanation on the note of January 2. 1793 with your signature and It may be inferred, from the attention to record the information of Clingman therein stated after what had passed between us, that you meant to give credit and sanction to the suggestion that the...
Your letter of yesterday in answer to mine of the same date was received last night. I am sorry to say, that as I understand it, it is unsatisfactory. It appears to me liable to this inference, that the information of Clingman had revived the suspicions which my explanation had removed. This would include the very derogatory suspicion, that I had concerted with Reynolds not only the...
In my last letter to you I proposed a simple and direct question, to which I had hoped an answer equally simple and direct. That which I have received, though amounting, if I understand it, to an answer in the negative, is conceived in such circuitous terms as may leave an obscurity upon the point which ought not to have remained. In this situation, I feel it proper to tell you frankly my...
I have maturely considered your letter of yesterday delivered to me at about Nine last and cannot find in it cause of satisfaction. There appears to me in the first place an attempt to prop the veracity of Clingman by an assertion which is not correct, namely that I had acknowleged all his previous information to be true. This was not & could not be the fact. I acknowleged parts of it to be...
Your letter of the 25 instant reached me yesterday. Without attempting to analize the precise import of your expressions, in that particular, and really at a loss for your meaning when you appeal to my knowlege of a determination to which you say you should firmly adhere, I shall observe, in relation of the idea of my desiring to make the affair personal between us, that it would be no less...