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    • Jefferson, Thomas
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It would seem mighty idle for me to inform you formally of the merits of Col o Trumbull as a painter or as a man. yet he asks my notice of him to my friends , as if his talents had not already distinguished him in their notice. on the continent of Europe his genius was placed much above West ’s. Baron Grimm , the arbiter of taste at Paris in my day, expressed to me often his decided & high...
The strange jumble of names, places, & titles on the inclosed letter seemed to authorise me to open it, as it does also to forward it to you. yet it properly belongs to neither of us but to the Secretary of the Treasury to whom it makes splendid promises. Our election of electors took place yesterday. a general assurance that there would be no opposition ticket prevented half the voters from...
I inclose you the letters on finance, for perusal. I had not an opportunity of proposing the reading them to the President , there being much company with him. when will the ladies & yourself do us the favor of a visit? RC ( NN : Monroe Papers); dateline at foot of text; addressed: “The Secretary of State”; with endorsement and notes by Monroe on verso. Not recorded in SJL . Enclosures: TJ to...
I inclose a letter from a M r John Dortic , who being bound to France shortly and to return again, wishes to be the bearer of any dispatches the government may have for that country. of this person I know nothing more than that he brought me lately a packet of seeds from M. Thouin Director of the National garden of France , which he very kindly notified me of from N.Y. and afterwards forwarded...
Since my last to you , the Directors of the Rivanna company have changed their minds, and instead of going through my canal they have determined to go through the bed of the river; and it being a question between us, whether they or I must build & maintain the lock at my dam, which dam they must have built had I not done it, they have proposed a reference to Arbitrators, to which I gladly...
When I retired from the government, I yielded with too much facility, first to the importunities of my friends to aid them in getting commands in the army and navy, next of mere acquaintances, and lastly of those also of whom I knew nothing. the business became laborious and irksome to myself, and, as I was sufficiently sensible, embarrassing and unpleasant to the government. determined at...
Your favor on your departure from Richmond came to hand in due time. altho’ I may not have been among the first, I am certainly with the sincerest who congratulate you on your reentrance into the public National councils. your value there has never been unduly estimated by those whom personal feelings did not misguide. the late misunderstandings at Washington have been a subject of real...
I thank you for your letter of the 6 th . it is a proof of your friendship, and of the sincere interest you take in whatever concerns me. of this I have never had a moment’s doubt, and have ever valued it as a precious treasure. the question indeed whether I knew or approved of Gen l Wilkinson’s endeavors to prevent the restoration of the right of deposit at N. Orleans could never require a...
I sent to mr Divers to-day to ask a dinner for mr Correa , D r Wistar , mr Gilmer & myself for tomorrow. I did not venture to add your name and mr Rush ’s not knowing your convenience; but I am sure he will be rejoiced to see you both. Affectionate salutations to yourself & mr Rush
The events which have lately taken place at Washington , & which truly disgrace our enemies much more than us, have occupied you too much to admit intrusions by private & useless letters. you seem indeed to have had your hands full with the duties of the field and the double duties of the Cabinet. the success of M c Donough has been happily timed to dispel the gloom of your present meeting,...
Yours of July 25. was recieved on the 31 st . I learn by it with extreme concern that you have in contemplation the sale of the lands here. I had ever fondly hoped for your return to our society when you should have run out your career of public usefulness. perhaps however my age should relieve me from the pain of such long prospects. the survey of mr Short’s land which you saw in my hand...
The arbitrators, surveyor E t c met on the 21 st . they decided the line in your favor, but divided costs as a tax on you for so careless a designation of the line as to entrap a subsequent purchaser. the disputed lines were found to contain 68. acres. the costs will be 6. or 7.D. a piece to you. I inclose you the original award & the plat you inclosed to me. RC ( MWiCA : Robert Sterling Clark...
Th: Jefferson incloses to Col o Monroe the copy of a letter he proposes to send to mr Champe Carter , if the contents meet his approbation; which he asks the favor of him to signify to him, with the return of the letter. he sets out to mr Madison’s early tomorrow morning, weather permitting, which he does not mention to have any influence on Col o Monroe’s movements. perhaps indeed their...
I am just on the wing to Bedford to which place my affairs call me suddenly. I have therefore only time to acknolege the reciept of your favor of the 21 st and to congratulate you on your election to the chair of the state by so honorable a vote. I rejoice too that you have accepted it; for altho’ it is not a field on which much genius can be displayed, yet it is a prominent one. but the great...
Not doubting that you have C in your office Centuplicates at least of the last Census , and of the reports of the patents for new inventions which are made I believe annually from the patent office, you will gratify me much by having a copy inclosed to me. affectionately Adieu. PoC ( MHi ); dateline at foot of text; endorsed by TJ. The census sought by TJ was Aggregate amount of each...
I know that your esteem for our mutual friend Kosciuszko will interest you in relieving the sufferings under which he now is in Paris . all his funds are in our monied institutions, and we are now transferring them into the hands of the government on the new loan. but the cause of his distress is our inability to find the means of remitting his annual interest, the sole source of his...
Will you join mr Divers here at dinner tomorrow? and can you tell me the name of the Collector at Norfolk ? RC (facsimile in Gerard A. J. Stodolski, Inc. , spring 1985 catalogue, item 96); partially dated at foot of text. Not recorded in SJL . The collector at norfolk was Charles K. Mallory .
I shall always be happy when your own or mrs Monroe’s convenience will permit us to see you here; but know too well that the short visits you pay to your possessions, & the many things to be attended to there, do not admit your being embarrassed with visits & ceremonies. consider us therefore as fully aware of this, that our intercourse must be subordinate to these circumstances, & that the...
Had I known before that the visit you mention was desired, I would have made it. it cannot now be done, as he sat out on his journey this morning. some opportunities of friendly attention had before occurred, during his illness, and I availed myself of them; & learning last night that ripe figs would be acceptable to him, & that he was to set out on his journey this morning, I sent a servant...
The inclosed letter is for a daughter of the late D r Bruff , who wrote me a pathetic letter on the death of her father. altho I considered him as an ingenious and virtuous man, and always shewed him that I wished his success, yet there never was any particular acquaintance between us beyond the drawing of a tooth or two. I do not therefore exactly see the scope of the letter. but whatever it...
Your letter of the 10 th has been duly recieved. the objects of our contest being thus entirely changed by England , we must prepare for interminable war. to this end we should put our house in order, by providing men and money to indefinite extent. the former may be done by classing our militia, and assigning each class to the description of duties for which it is fit. it is nonsense to talk...
It had escaped my recollection till this moment that you had desired me to send you the copy of La Harpe’s journal. you will find bound up with it some Extracts from it which I had made because bearing immediately on the question of right, and a duplicate copy of the letters of Cevallos Salcedo & Herrera . if your office possesses the original, as I am sure it does, I will be glad to have this...
Your letters of Nov. 30. & Dec. 21. have been recieved with great pleasure. a truth now and then projecting into the ocean of Newspaper lies, serves like headlands to correct our course. indeed my scepticism as to every thing I see in a newspaper makes me indifferent whether I ever see one. the embarrasments at Washington in August last, I expected would be great in any state of things; but...
I thank you for the communication of the President’s message which has not yet reached us thro’ the public papers. it is an interesting document, always looked for with anxiety, and the late one is equally able as interesting. I hope Congress will act in conformity with it in all it’s parts. the unwarrantable ideas often expressed in the newspapers, and by persons who ought to know better,...
A mr Arm i stead , who married a neice of our governor , who is brother to the Col o Arm i stead that defended the fort at Baltimore and of one , or two other officers of great merit lost in the service, and who
Your favors of the 7 th & 16 th are recieved, & I now return you the Memoir inclosed in the former. I am much gratified by it’s communication because, as the plan appeared in the newspapers soon after the new Secretary at War came into office, we had given him the credit of it. every line of it is replete with wisdom; and we might lament that our tardy enlistments prevented it’s execution,...
With this letter I put into the post office a very large pa cket containing all the papers respecting the Batture which I reciev ed from your office. for these papers I gave a specific receipt , sub scribed to a list of them. I had stitched them together in qui res to prevent their separation or loss in the hands of counsel . I hope mr Graham will take the trouble to examine them by my...
Your favor of the 10 th is this moment recieved. the plat it covers shall be duly examined. you were so kind as to say you would patronise the passage of my letters for France and England . I therefore inclose a packet to you. it is important to me that those to Jackson and Cathalan should have the benefit of the first safe conveyance. I was soon ashamed of the hasty information I communicated...
It is impossible for you to note and preserve every thing as it passes in newspapers. I have therefore cut out of the Virginia Argus of Feb. 14. the inclosed paper . have it filed with the papers on the Louisiana title, and when you have to take up that subject it will suggest to you facts for enquiry. it is from some hand acquainted well with the subject, it & contains some facts not in the...
If it be proposed to place an inscription on the Capitol , the lapidary style requires that essential facts only should be stated, and these with a brevity admitting no superfluous word. the essential facts in the two inscriptions proposed are these the reasons for this brevity are that the letters must be of extraordinary magnitude to be read from below; that little space is allowed them,...
It being interesting to me that the inclosed letters should get safely to their destination, I pray you to give them a passage under the protection of your cover by your first dispatches to Paris & Leghorn . On my return from Bedford I had proposed a meeting of the arbitrators & surveyor to settle finally the question between you & mr Short . but successive snows which have kept the ground...
I now return you the letter of mr Carter which was inclosed in yours of Nov. 3. and which was 6. weeks on it’s passage to me. the reference to myself which you are both so kind as to propose I must beg leave to decline. I could not trust myself with such a decision. for altho’ I should certainly endeavor to see nothing but the facts of the case, yet even as to these, my having been the sole...
A most important appointment for the landholders of our part of the country is now about to be made, that of the Assessor of the land tax, who is to decide what portion of the aggregate sum assessed on our district shall be paid by each individual. such a man should be enlightened, judicious, firm and independant. on consultation with our best men, I the last year recommended to the President...
I recieved your friendly letter of Dec. 24. on my return from Bedford , at which place I was at it’s date. it conveyed me the first notice of the attempt to draw me into the newspapers on the subject of the propositions which had been passing between the agents of the Rivanna company & myself for their accomodation in passing the navigation through my lands. I immediately enquired into it, and...
Your letter covering that of Gen l Scott is recieved, and his is now returned. I am very thankful for these communications. from 40. years experience of the wretched guesswork of the newspapers of what is not done in open day light, and of their falsehood even as to that, I rarely think them worth reading, & almost never worth notice. a ray therefore now & then from the fountain of light is...