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By The President’s order B. Dandridge respectfully transmits to The Secretary of War the enclosed papers respecting proceedings had by Govr Blount with the southern Indians, with a request that he will carefully peruse them & see if any & what parts require to be acted upon immediately. The President desires that The Secy of War will, in his Letters to Govr Blount, request him to make known to...
By the Presidents order B. Dandridge respectfully transmits the enclosed papers to The Secy of War; & informs him that the ideas on the subject of them both of The Secy of War & Secy of State, are agreeable to those of the President. The President suggests that by consult[i]ng with Genl Wayne perhaps a better distribution of the troops might be had—this however he submits to the Secretary. AL...
[ New York, January 19, 1796. Letter listed in dealer’s catalogue. Letter not found. ] ALS , sold by Ben Bloomfield, New York City, 1954, List DM-2, Item 49.
[ Philadelphia, September 23, 1792. On September 30, 1792, McHenry wrote to Hamilton : “I received your letter of the 23.” Letter not found. ]
[ Philadelphia, April 26, 1791. On May 3, 1791, McHenry wrote to Hamilton : “I did not receive your letter of the 26th till the morning of the 2d.” Letter not found. ] McHenry, who had served as George Washington’s secretary during the American Revolution, had attended the Constitutional Convention and the Maryland Ratifying Convention. He was a member of the Maryland Assembly from 1788 to 1790.
Your letter of the 15 of October came duly to hand and an answer has only be[en] delayed through extreme hurry. My views on the point you mentioned cannot have changed and I am glad to know how you stand. All that confidence or attachment on my part could dictate will be employed. But nothing is certain. And nothing ought to be suspended on the event. Indeed I cannot perceive how the one thing...
It is a good while My Dear Mac since I have either written to or received a line from you. I embrace the first moment I have been really able to spare to say some things to you which have for some time “lain heavy on my mind.” I have been conscious that I owed you an explanation concerning the issue of a certain Inspectorship and I have meditated it ever since that issue took place. In giving...
I am told the Executive Directory have complained of Mr. Parish our Consul at Hamburgh. Perhaps the complaint may be ill founded but perhaps also he was indiscreet in giving colour for it. Admit too that he is a good man. Yet we must not quarrel with France for pins and needles . The public temper would not bear any umbrage taken where a trifling concession might have averted it. Tis a case...
I have considered the articles of War & rather think the case is not provided for by them. I incline to the opinion that The President ex officio as Commander in Chief has power to order a General Court Martial. But the exercise of this power would be liable to too much question & Criticism to be expedient. What then is to be done? The President has a right to dis⟨miss⟩ Military Officers as...
Take my ideas and weigh them of a proper course of conduct for our administration in the present juncture. You have called Congress—tis well. When the Senate meets (which I should be glad to see anticipated) send a Commission extraordinary to France. Let it consist of Jefferson or Madison Pinckney & a third very safe man, say Cabot . Proclaim a Religious solemnity to take place at the Meeting...
[ Philadelphia, September 27, 1792. On September 30, 1792, McHenry wrote to Hamilton : “I received … yours of the 27th.” Letter not found. ]
This will probably be handed you by Mrs De Neuville widow of Mr. De Neuville of Holland a Gentleman who embarked very zealously and very early in the cause of this country—was instrumental in promoting it and as I understand an object of persecution in consequence of it, which was a link in the chain of his pecuniary ruin. I think his widow has a strong claim upon the kindness of our country...
[ Philadelphia, August 10, 1792. On October 20, 1792, McHenry wrote to Hamilton: “I have just recd your letter of the 10th Ulto.” Letter not found. ] At this time McHenry was a member of the Maryland Senate.
Mr. Morris, our Minister at Paris, has recommended to me a Madame de la Mariniere, whom the troubles of St. Domingo have driven to Baltimore. He did it at the request of the Duke de Penthievre. Want of acquaintance myself in Baltimore, leaves me no means of complying with their request to procure her introduction into the best company, but to sollicit your attentions to the lady. The...
Having sent your letters to Mr. Short with a desire that he will, as far as is right, patronize the applications which shall be made to the minister on your demand, instead of destroying your first letter to Messrs. Le Couteulx, I have thought it better to return it to you, in proof that your desires have been complied with.—A murder of some friendly Indians a little beyond Fort Pitt is likely...
I recieved yesterday your favor of the 18th. and called to-day on Mr. Hammond. He said he could not give a passport of any kind which would be an absolute protection to either the French passengers or their baggage, but that he would give a letter of recommendation to all commanders of ships and others exhorting them to permit the passengers and what might be properly called their baggage to...
An extraordinary press of business ever since the meeting of Congress has obliged me to suspend all my correspondencies so that it is not till now that I am able to take them up, and among the first your favor of Dec. 14. On the subject of that I am obliged to ask you to name some person at Paris who may, as your agent, attend to all the details of sollicitation, as it would be impossible for...
[ Philadelphia, 31 July 1791 . “Will Dr. McHenry do Thomas Jefferson the favour to make one of a small committee of friends to dine tomorrow at half after three? Sunday July 31, 1791.” MS sold at City Book Auction Sale No. 420, 18 Sep. 1948, lot 84. Not found and not recorded in SJL.]
Your favor of Aug. 29 . was brought to me in the country yesterday. I immediately sent to town by express in hopes of being able to procure what you desired to be sent by the post of this day. Mr. Van Berkel however was out of town, as also the Spanish Commissioners, and not to be in town soon. I inclose you my note to Mr. Taylor, my chief clerk, and his pencilled statement of what Mr. Hammond...
The inclosed paper came to the President from one of the unhappy fugitives of St. Domingo, of the name of Lentilhon, now at Baltimore. He represents himself as 63. years of age, labouring under a fever, uncomfortably lodged, wanting linen, outer clothes, and other necessaries, for the approaching winter, and his passage to France in the Spring. Without doubting that the assistance of the...
The Post of Friday last brought me your dispatches of the 26th Ulto, with the Papers therein enclosed. The draught of a letter to the Agent of the Department of War, and the Instructions for the person proposed as a Deputy paymaster and Storekeeper in the State of Tennessee, are guarded, and proper. The only doubt remaining with me, is whether so many Officers, in that quarter, are realy...
In reply to your statement of the case of the Cadets, in the Corps of Artillerists and Engineers; I give it as my opinion that no promotion of them should take place at present, under the circumstances you have related. When I return to Philadelphia, it will be expected that you will bring forward the general plan for new modeling the Army agreeably to the late Act of Congress, at which time...
Let this letter be received with the same friendship and frankness, with which it is written, nothing would add more to the satisfaction this would give me, than your acceptance of the offer I am going to make you. Without further preface then, will you suffer me to nominate you to the office of Secretary of War? That I may give evidence of the candour I have professed above, I shall inform...
The enclosed letter from Mr Landais, transmitting one from you to him, was received by the last Post. Filling the vacancies in the Corps of Artillery, before the adjournment of the Senate, was suggested; but why, as it was not proposed by the military Act, that it should undergo any diminution, it was not done, my memory does not serve me. If there are more Cadets in that Regiment than Mr...
Your letter of the 27th Ulto by Post, with its enclosures (the originals of which, I return) came to my hands on Wednesday. And your other letters of the 27th & 28th by Express, was received about five oclock yesterday afternoon. The accounts brought in the latter, are very pleasing indeed, inasmuch as they will serve to remove the doubts of the credulous (with respect to the Western Posts);...
I have not segacity enough to discover what end was to be answered by reporting—first, that I was to be in Philadelphia on the 4th July—and secondly, when that report was contradicted by my non-appearance, then to account for it by a fall from my Phæton. If any scheme could have originated; or been facilitated by these, or any other reports, however unfounded, I should not have been surprised...
I have been favored with your letter of the 11th of this month, and thank you very cordially for the information contained in it. I have also received your letter of the 9th instant, recommending Mr J. H. Purviance to fill the Office of Surveyor of the Port of Baltimore. And altho’ you know it is not my custom to answer letters of this description; yet on the present occasion I have thought it...
The enclosed letter presents a serious—perhaps a just view of the subject which has been under consideration —and as I wish in every thing, particularly in matters of foreign relation, to conduct with caution; I request that your letter to the Govr General of Canada; the Instructions to Major Lewis; and all your arrangements respecting the reception of the Posts may accord with the ideas...
The letters, with their enclosures from Genl Wilkenson, shew in an additional strong point of view, the indispensable necessity of moving the requisite quantity of Provisions & Stores to the upper Posts of the Army, North West of the Ohio. I therefore desire, you will not only make the necessary arrangements with Genl Wayne (to whom the contents of these Papers might be communicated) but...
(Private) Dear Sir, Mount Vernon Augt 13th 1792. Your letter of the 17th of July came duly to hand. I could, with pleasure, spend a day in Baltimore on my return to Philadelphia, if time & circumstances would permit; but it is not for me at this moment to say whether either would suit me; besides, I shall confess to you candidly, I have no relish for formal & ceremonious engagements, and only...
Your letter of the 6th instant, with copies of other letters to the Secretaries of State, and Treasury; respecting the charges exhibited by Brigadier Wilkinson against General Wayne, has been received; and when an opinion is formed thereon, I shall expect to receive it. I know of nothing, at present, that will prevent my being in Philadelphia between the 15th of August and first of September:...
As I propose to enter upon my journey to Philadelphia tomorrow; this letter only serves to cover the Papers which I received from you by the last Post; and to inform you that the draught of the Letter to the Governor of Georgia meets my approbation, under the general lights I have of the subject; but before you part with it, I again desire that you would learn the Sentiments of Colo. Hawkins &...
(Confidential) Dear Sir, New York Novr 30th 1789. I have received your letter of the 14th instt—and in consequence of the suggestions contained therein, added to other considerations which occurred to me, I have thought it best to return Judge Harrison his Commission, and I sincerely hope that upon a further consideration of the Subject he may be induced to revoke his former determination &...
(Private) Dear Sir, Mount Vernon Augt 31st 1792 The characters given of Messrs Smith & Hollingsworth by you, comports very much with those I have received from others, and therefore of the two, the preference is given to the former. But as neither stand upon such high grounds as Mr Tilghman or Mr Hammond, and as it is my duty as well as inclination to fill Offices with the most suitable...
Your letter of the 3d instant, with the information of our possession of Fort Ontario (lately occupied by the Troops of Great Britain) and the correspondence between Captn Bruff of the United States Troops, and Captn Clarke of the British was brought to me by the last Post. Several matters are submitted by the former for consideration; among them, the mode of supplying the Garrison with fire...
(Private) Dear Sir, Mount Vernon Septr 21st [1792]. Fearing some accident may have prevented my last (enclosing a letter for Mr Robt Smith) from reaching your hands, I take the liberty of giving you the trouble to receive this, requesting to be informed if this be the fact—and if not, what has been the result of your enquiries in the business Committed to you. I have had many applications in...
If it is not too late for Fenno’s Paper of this Afternoon, an extract from Chapins letter, respecting the removal of the Artillery, Stores &ca from Niagara, to the other side of the River (British side) might afford pleasing information. I presume there can be no doubt of its authenticity. Yrs always PHi : Dreer Collection.
Your letter of the 14th came duly to hand. On the contents of the enclosure, I shall make no comments ’till I see you; which, probably, will be on, or about, the first of next month. Let me remind you of what I have before requested—namely, to have noted against my arrival, all those things which will be fit and proper subjects for my communication to Congress (in the Speech) at the opening of...
Your letter of the 18th instant with its enclosures, came to hand by the last Mail. Such of the latter, as are original, I herewith return to your Office. It would appear from the extract of Mr Habersham’s letter, that the Treaty (or rather meeting) between the Georgians and Creek Indians, has terminated unfavourably; and will tend, it is to be feared, to hostilities. A favorable result could...
Your letters of the 21st & 24th instant have been duly received. The last, in time on tuesday, to give in the nominations of yourself & Mr Chase for the Offices contemplated. The day following they were advised & consented to by the Senate; and the Commissions will be ready for the reception of you both on your arrival in this City. of this be so good as to inform Mr Chase; and, if he is still...
Let me entreat you to attend early this morning to a fit character as a Comr to attend the proposed Treaty with the Indians, by Mr Morris; and on this head, and on the message proper to accompany the nomination, I wish you would advise with Colo. Pickering; who has had more to do in Indian Affairs than any other Officer now in the Government, and perhaps may more readily think of a proper...
(Private) Dear Sir, Philadelphia 8th April 1794 Your private letters of the 31st of March & 3d instt have been duly received. Although it is a rare, if not an entire new thing with me, to answer letters applying for appointments, yet from motives of esteem & regard, & our former connexion in public life, I shall acknowledge the receipt of yours on this head; although I can say nothing more on...
Colo. Hawkins is now here, on his way to Philadelphia, & proposes to proceed in the Stage of tomorrow. He has related ma ny matters, a nd read ma ny papers re la tive to t he Trea ty with the Creek Ind ians; the
The purport of your private letter, of the 7th instant (that part of it I mean, which relates to the Frigate for the Regency of Algiers) has surprised me exceedingly. That no step yet, should have been taken to carry this measure into vigorous execution; and that it should be asked, near six weeks after it had been resolved to comply with the Deys request, and an actual stipulation of our...
I have read all the letters of General Wayne, and their enclosures; as I have also done those of Captn Bruff and others, which you have laid before me. Note such matters (in all of them) as require particular directions, which I shall be ready to give whenever they are laid before me. The other parts, which call only for Office attention, will, I am persuaded, meet with prompt & ready...
This letter will be presented to you by Mr Dandridge, who has rejoined my family and proceeds to Philadelphia in order to facilitate the recording of my loose files. As he left my family a little suddenly, I thought it necessary to mention this matter to you, lest that circumstance should be ascribed to unworthy motives; none of which I have to charge him with, as I always had, and still have,...
Having but this moment returned from a Ride, I could not hand the enclosed to you sooner. As an expression therein stood, it might have embarrassed the Commissioner. What the Indians might deem a good price, & be well content to receive, he might judge inadequate; and thereby, so tied down, might mar the Negociation. To see that the business is conducted fairly , and with candour is enough....
Your letters of the 10th, 12th and 13th instant, with their enclosures, came all by the last Mail to Alexandria; and were received by me on Saturday morning. The contents of such parts as require it, shall be noticed. The greatest, and what appears to me to be an insuperable difficulty in the way of running and marking the boundary line between the United States and the Cherokee tribe of...
I shall have occasion to write to Mr Lear by tomorrow’s Post, and would thank you to let me know (in a summary way) what money he has drawn on acct of the Arsenal on the Potomack, and what report he has made to the War Office of his proceedings in that business, for I shall take an occasion (as from myself) to ask him what has been done therein. Yours always DLC .
Having written a great many letters for this day’s Post; and being a good deal fatigued thereby and with the heat of the weather, I shall do no more, at present, than to inform you that your letters of the 2d and 3d instant with the enclosures of the first —came perfectly safe, and that my letter to the Secretary of State, of this date, will inform you confidentially of my decision with...