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The only questions which press on the Executive for decision are Whether we shall enter into a provisional alliance with England to come into force only in the event that during the present war we become engaged in war with France ? leaving the declaration of the casus federis ultimately to us. Whether we shall send away Yrujo, Casacalvo, Morales? Whether we shall instruct Bowdoin not to go to...
Yours of the 20th. came to hand last night. I sincerely regret that mrs Madison is not likely to be able to come on so soon as had been hoped. the probability of an extensive war on the continent of Europe strengthening every day for some time past, is now almost certain. this gives us our great desideratum, time. in truth it places us quite at our ease. we are certain of one year of...
Will you be so good as to give this a severe correction both as to stile & matter, & as early a one as you can, because there remains little enough time to submit it to our brethren successively, to have copies made Etc. think also what documents it requires, & especially as to Spanish affairs. before we promise a subsequent communication on that subject, it would be well to agree on it’s...
The inclosed barbarous Italian would require more consideration to be perfectly understood than I have time to bestow on it. I believe mr Wagner reads Italian. if he does, a good translation should be made; and it sets up such serious pretensions as that I think we should give it to Eaton & desire him to make a statement of what passed between him & the Ex bashaw & such a one as we may...
how will it do to amend the passage—respecting England to read as follows? ‘New principles too have been interpolated into the law of Nations, founded neither in justice, nor the usage or acknolegement of nations. according to these a belligerent takes to itself a commerce with it’s own enemy, which it denies to a Neutral on the ground of it’s aiding that enemy. but reason revolts at such an...
will become able to regulate with effect their respective functions in these departments. the burthen of Quarentines is felt at home as well as abroad. their efficacy merit examination. although the health laws of the states should not at this moment be found to require a particular revisal by Congress. yet Commerce claims that their attention be ever awake to them. [Madison’s reply:] (a)...
As we omit in the 2d. message to enumerate the aggressions of Spain, and refer for them to the documents, we must furnish the documents for every act, particularly - 1. the capture of the Huntress - 2. the carrying our gunboats into Algesiras. - 3. the late depredations on our commerce in Europe. Extracts from Pinckney’s letters. - 4. oppressions on our commerce on Mobille - 5. the delays of...
additions proposed on some subjects suggested by mr Gallatin submitted to mr Madison by the object of the 1st. addition is to give a practical or ostensible object to the observations on Yellow fever: the true one however being to present facts to the governments of Europe, which in the ordinary course of things, would not otherwise reach them in half a century. DLC : Papers of James Madison.
Governor Hull wishes to enquire of the Secretary of State, whether he received his Letter inclosing a Copy of the proclamation, he was directed to issue, and whether for the reasons stated in his Letter the President, thought it expedient, to authorize the Governor, or any other officer, to grant permission to cut such quantities of pine timber as was absolutely necessary, under the peculiar...
The Tunisian Ambassador put into my hands the packet now sent, & at his request I promised it should be safely returned to him before he went away, as it contains the originals of letters. it presents a chronological view of the Bey’s correspondence with our officers, with explanatory statements of facts connecting them. I found the whole worth reading, tho’ I had read the letters hastily...
I think the District atty of N.Y. should be immediately instructed to investigate the expedition of the Leander, & of every person concerned in it; and to learn how it has happened that the officers of the government at that place should have paid no attention & given no information of it while going on. on the report of the Atty to us we may decide what shall be done. DNA : RG...
Should not Claiborne be instructed to enter into a correspondence with Casa-Calvo, to insist on keeping things in their present state, and to let him understand that if any new settlement is made in the disputed territory, and particularly the one meditated on Trinity we shall break it up. DNA : RG 59—ML—Miscellaneous Letters.
What would you think of raising a force for the defence of New Orleans in this manner? give a bounty of 50 acres of land, to be delivered immediately, to every able bodied man who will immediately settle on it, & hold himself in readiness to perform 2. years military service (on the usual pay) if called on within the first seven years of his residence. the lands to be chosen by himself of any...
I think the several modifications in mr Gallatin’s paper may be reduced to simple instructions in some such form as follows. The sum to be paid will consist I. of 2. millions ready money. II. of a residuary sum, not exceeding 3. millions, to be paid afterwards as shall be agreed. I. the ready money (as a 1st. proposition) not to be paid till possession of the whole country ceded is delivered &...
1. Spain shall cede & confirm to the US. of A. East & West Florida, with the islands & waters thereon depending, & shall deliver possession thereof on the ratification by her of this treaty. 2. The US. shall pay to Spain in the city of   within   after this treaty shall have been ratified on her part five millions of dollars. 3. Spain & France shall have the same privileges respecting trade &...
my list tells me I signed commissions for the following persons, which being omitted in the list now recieved from the office, renders it desirable that the office be again examined to ascertain whether the error is in their list or mine. Mar. 9. Julien Poydrass of Orleans a member of the legislative council of Orleans.  20. Lemuel Trescott of Massach. Collectr. & Inspector of Machias. the...
As the letter proposed to the Emperor of Russia may lead to something of importance, I wish to communicate it to the other gentlemen of the admn.    will you therefore be so good as to correct it severely , and return it to me as you would approve it? DLC : Papers of James Madison, Rives Collection.
I presume the correspondence between the Ambassador of Tunis & Secretary of State, must be considd as exhibiting the only causes of difference, & that that correspondence alone need be sent to the Senate. want of time for copies must authorize sending the originals, to be returned DNA : RG 59—ML—Miscellaneous Letters.
I have recieved, signed & forwarded Poydrass’s commission, & have forwarded the letter to Prevost. I inclose for your perusal a letter from Armstrong. the part therein stated changes considerably the idea we had formed of Bowdoin’s caution & prudence. that mentioned in Bowdoin’s letter is comfortable tho’ it be little more than a repetition of what Armstrong had communicated. some additional...
Your express arrived at 12. aclock this day & I dispatch him in half an hour with the papers for Mr. Pinckney signed. I inclose another letter to Monroe, to be forwarded by him. affectionate salutations. DLC : Papers of Thomas Jefferson.
My letter to mr Smith takes up the whole of the subject of his & your letters by the last post, and as he informs me he has a vessel on demurrage till he recieves my answer, I hire an express which will deliver it 5. days sooner than the post would. not to detain him I must refer you to my letter to mr Smith for answer to yours. I return you mr Barlow’s letter. his anxiety makes me more...
I observe also that I signed the following Commission omitted in the list from the office. May 20. John Broadbent of Sicily Consul for Messina; yet I seem to have some faint recollection that this appointment had been approved by the Senate. [ note in Madison’s hand :] John Broadbent was submitted to, and approved by the Senate the 17 Jany. 1806, but not having received his commission, a...
Your’s by the last post was recieved yesterday, and I now return Monroe’s letters. that Armstrong should be returning so suddenly & without notice is quite an impossibility. any other hypothesis for his journey to Amsterdam would be more probable. I send you a letter from Pierpoint Edwards respecting Swartwout: his testimony against him cannot be suspected, considering their mutual relation to...
Your’s of the 26th. came to hand yesterday. I now return you the letters recieved from you of Shrader, Bowdoin, Armstrong, Milner, Lee, Forbes, Merry, your’s to him, and Duplantier’s. I inclose a letter to me from Brudenhem to be filed & not otherwise noticed, and one from Vettenhort, in which we are bound by courtesy to do what can be done without inconvenience. In another package I inclose...
I return the Commission made out for mr Briscoe as Commissioner of the Western road, his residence at or near Fort-Cumberland being thought to make him liable to an influence which might affect the direction of the road. Baltimore being peculiarly interested in having that road conducted along the best rout without regard to the local interests of the neighborhood, I have thought it best to...
I left at Washington a great coat of which I shall have great need. should this reach you before your departure I will thank you to bring it; and it will be in time if I recieve it when you come to Monticello yourself, as it will be on my return only that it will be wanting. I have written to mr Lemaire to deliver it to you. the drought in this quarter is excessive. it begins about the...
I return you the letter of DeWitt Clinton & your answer. I think that if he can deliver or send to Mellimelli the refractory members of his family under the ordinary laws of N:Y. it will be better; but that force should be employed if other resources fail. Airth’s letter & the anonymous one from Havanna are also returned. I send you a letter from the new King of Wirtemburg, one from some...
I return you mr Lear’s letters; in which I am sorry to find he says not a word about the Tripoline family. I presume the family has chosen not to be given up. I inclose you a letter from Salvatore Bosutti at Malta, which may be filed in the office I presume without answer. Noble’s letter & sample should I suppose be filed in the patent-office. it may be a charity tho’ it is not a duty to...
Your’s of the 4th. is recieved. I think the course which has been taken for sending MelliMeni home is the best: & I concur with you in the expediency of giving no answer to Turreau. indeed his letter does not seem to call for one. in the present state of our affairs it will certainly be better not to appoint a Consul at St. Thomas’s. we must not risk great things for small. a Consul merely to...
I send you some papers from the Secretary of Louisiana for your office; also a letter from Sanford to mr Gallatin for your perusal & then to be reinclosed to mr Gallatin. altho’ I have not heard of your arrival at home, yet I trust that you are there. I expect to set out for Bedford tomorrow or very shortly after, & shall be absent 10. days. This may account for delays of answers to your...
The death of Meriwether Jones having taken place, I have written to mr Wagner directly to forward to mr Page a Commission for the loan office, in order to save a post and shorten the term of sollicitations. I shall set out this morning for Bedford & be back about the 25th. Affectionate salutations. DLC : Papers of James Madison.
On my return the day before yesterday I found here your’s of the 15th. as the Russian ships are expected at Philadelphia are connected with the Imperial family, and their report will certainly be made to the emperor, would it not be well for you to write either to mr Gallatin, or at shorter hand, to Muhlenberg to recommend them to his particular attention good offices & indulgence, & those of...
Yours of the 30th. I recieved yesterday, and now return the papers from Cathcart, Sullivan, De Ponceau, Ramage, Barnet, Merry, & that concerning Lewis. in a former letter I had suggested to you the waiting to arrest Lewis in some other state (for I believe that such an offence may be tried any where) but considering the change of the Marshall it is possible a fair jury may be obtained now in...
I inclose you a letter & sundry papers recieved from mr Gallatin of which I will ask the return. 1. as to the refractory Tunisians I think we should pay their passage & get rid of them. if they would stipulate to deliver themselves to any Tunisian or other Barbary Agent in England, it would excuse us to the Bey of Tunis. The case of an American citizen impressed on board the Chichester, &...
Yours by yesterday’s post has been recieved, & I now return you the letters of Yznardi, Wilkinson, Cathcart, Clinton, Toulman & Turreau. in the answer to the latter I think it would be better to lay more stress on the constitutional bar to our furnishing the money, because it would apply in an occasion of peace as well as war. I submit to you therefore the striking out the words ‘It is not &c...
I now return you the papers recieved by yesterday’s post. the letter to Monroe & one to Merry are forwarded mr Wagner, that to Merry respecting a murder committed on the high seas by a British subject, on board a British vessel, & on a British subject is returned for consideration, as not being as explicit as amity to that government & the clear principle of right requires. I think he might be...
I send you the draught of a proclamation dated for tomorrow. I think all the letters & orders, to the effect already agreed on, should be instantaneously got ready; and I ask the heads of departments to meet here tomorrow at 11. aclock to consider what additional measures can be taken for forcing the Cambrian off, and for preventing her entering any other port of the US. would it not be proper...
I herewith Transmit, for your Consideration The inclosed Letters Re c omending Mr. Wm S. Shaw as a suitable person for Consul of the Island of Medeira—I am not personally acquainted with the Gentleman, But am with his two Recomenders the Robinsons, they are Respectable Merchants of the City of New York, which Induces me to Join them in Soliciting your Interest for this appointment I am with...
The more I consider the letter of our Ministers in London the more seriously it impresses me. I believe the sine qua non we made is that of the nation, and that they would rather go on without a treaty than with one which does not settle this article. under this dilemma, and at this stage of the business, had we not better take the advice of the Senate? I ask a meeting at 11. aclock tomorrow...
The following Commissions to be made out Lemuel Trescott of Massachusets Collector of the district, & Inspector of the revenue for the port of Machias. Jonathan Palmer of Connecticut Surveyor of the port of Stonington, & Inspector of the revenue for the same. John Vernor junr. Surveyor of the port of Albany & Inspector of the revenue for the same. Robert Cochran of N. Carolina Collector for...
On further enquiry and examination, I find it necessary to correct the list of justices before given in for Alexandria county. Commissions are therefore desired for Washington & Alexandria counties according to the subjoined lists, giving to all those who were in the former commissions the order in which they were therein placed, and adding the new names to the end. Justices for Washington...
Mr. Rodney not being at Washington I send you the inclosed because it requires to be acted on immediately. I remember it was concluded that witnesses who should be brought from great distances, and carried from one scene of trial to another must have a reasonable allowance made for their expences & the money advanced. I expect it will be thought proper that the witnesses proving White’s...
Yours of the 13th. came to hand only yesterday & I now return you the letters of Turreau, Yrujo & Woodward, and mr Gallatin’s paper on foreign seamen. I retain Monroe & Pinckney’s letters to give them a more deliberate perusal than I can now before the departure of the post. by the next they shall be returned. I should think it best to answer Turreau at once, as he will ascribe delay to a...
Yours of the 20th. came to hand on the 23d. and I now return all the papers it covered, to wit Harris’s, Maurice’s & Genl. Smith’s letters, as also some papers respecting Burr’s case for circulation. under another cover is a letter from Govr. Williams, confidential & for yourself alone as yet. I expect we shall have to remove Meade. under still a different cover you will recieve Monroe’s &...
I return you Monroe’s, Armstrong’s, Harris’s & Anderson’s letters, & add a letter & act from Govr. Mc.Kean to be filed in your office. the proposition for separating the Western country mentioned by Armstrong to have been made at Paris is important. but what is the declaration he speaks of? for none accompanies his letter, unless he means Harry Grant’s proposition. I wish our ministers at...
I return you the pamphlet of the author of War in disguise of it’s first half the topics & the treatment of them are very common place. but from page 118. to 130. it is most interesting to all nations, and especially to us. convinced that a militia of all ages promiscuously are entirely useless for distant service, and that we never shall be safe until we have a selected corps for a year’s...
I recieved yesterday only yours of Apr. 27. with the letters of Armstrong, Turreau, Hull, Depeyster, Lee and the resolutions of Nelson county, all of which are now returned, with the pamphlet of the author of War in disguise, and a letter of Genl. Wilkinson’s for circulation & to remain with the Attorney Genl.   I recieved no letter from mr Gallatin on the subject of Turreau’s application for...
I return you Monroe’s letter of Mar. 5. as the explosion in the British ministry took place about the 15th. I hope we shall be spared the additional embarrasment of his convention. I inclose you a letter of Michl. Jones for circulation & to rest with the Atty Genl. it contains new instances of Burr’s enlistments. I recieved this from mr Gallatin, so you can hand it to Genl. Dearborn...
I arrived here yesterday after a passage of eighteen days from New Orleans. I came in the same vessel with Genl Wilkinson who has brought round with him, some eight or nine of Burrs men under an expectation that they will be important Witnesses. Some of them will probably tell all they know, but I fear this will not be the case with those who know most. The General has chartered a Pilot Boat...
On my arrival here, I found that the District Attorney was at Princeton, & I determined, if Burr had not left the city to apply immediately for a warrant against him for treason, so as to secure & have him put on in custody to Richmond for trial, unless some good natured judge released him upon Hab. Corpus. He has been obliged in order to elude the Sheriff’s officers who had, I am informed...