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Will you be so good as to read the inclosed Letter from Dr. Belknap and tell me, from your Recollection of what passed in Congress in 1779 1780 & 1781, whether there is any Colour for the Imputation cast on our Country by Dr Kippis. I cannot say as Dr Belknap has been informed that Dr Kippis is my Correspondent. I never wrote a Letter to him or received a Letter from him that I recollect.—I...
Mr Malcom was three years in my family at Philadelphia as my private Secretary; and during that time his conduct was ingenuous faithful industrious and attentive and entirely to my Satisfaction. His connections in New York were respectable, and his Education to Letters and the Bar regular. Altho, since the dissolution of that connection between him and me there has been no intercourse and very...
My Election to the Presidents Office was but by a majority of one, or at most of two Votes. Mr Jeffersons was by no Majority of the People, and by a Majority of one only in the House after Thirty or forty Votes equally divided between him and Mr Burr. Mr Jeffersons Second Election was by a great Majority and his third would have been by a greater Still, if he had not declined. Your Election...
A young Gentleman, and his Father, have requested me to mention his Name to The Secretary of The Navy. I choose rather to mention it to you. The youth has a fine Person, an elegant Figure, a fine Countenance, healthy vigorous and robust. His Education has been Accademical and mercantile in a very respectable House. His Father Served five years in our Revolutionary War, and his Grandfather was...
I have subscribed with Mr Gray and others a recommendation of Hendrick W Gordon Esquire a copy of which is enclosed. As he requests a separate Certificate, I enclose his letter and can sincerely say that from an acquaintance with him, of several years, I believe that what is said of him, in the Certificate, and in his letter, to be no more than he deserves; He is a civil, well bred man,...
I am very apprehensive that the liberties I so frequently take of writing to you will appear importunate if not impertinent But I beg it may be fully understood that none of my letters are to be answered; and that I shall perfectly acquiesce in your decisions well knowing the multiplicity of Candidates, the difficulty of making the selections & that the President is the only ultimate and...
The Reverend, Mr Henry Colman of Hingham, my Neighbour and Acquaintance has a Brother, as I am informed, who wishes to be considered as a Candidate, for a Commission in the Army. As the Brother is unknown to me, I can Say nothing of his Pretensions. But I can Say of the Minister, that in point of Taste and Sense he is fit for a Companion of a Jefferson and a Madison, and in point of Learning...
I have been informed that a number of very respectable Gentlemen are desirous of having the Honourable Richard Cutts Esqr of Biddeford in this State appointed to an Office under the Government of the United States, and wish to recommend him accordingly: but are very apprehensive that your delicacy, and nice sense of honour, or regard to your reputation will be an insuperable Obstacle to their...
Yesterday Morning expecting a Letter from Dr Rush I Sent early to the Post Office: but my Messenger brought me a Letter from Dr Waterhouse, which I inclose, having no words of my own to express my Feelings. The Shock was Sudden and unexpected. I had a Letter from Rush dated the 10th., apparently written in full health and fine Spirits. An unchangeable Friendship of thirty Eight Years had...
I ought to make an apology to you for the trouble I give you to read so many of my letters upon subjects with which perhaps I should have nothing to do. but as I am requested to give a simple letter of introduction to a gentleman going to Washington, I could not refuse it. Mr Andrew Eliot a respectable Merchant of Boston has a petition to present to the Administration or to the legislature or...
I was yesterday honoured with the favour of the 5 inclosing Dr Waterhouses letter to me of the 23 of April announcing to me the afflicting news of the death of one of my oldest and most intimate Friends Dr Rush. Though I can scarcely look over an obituary without mourning some ancient friend or acquaintance, none has affected me more sensibly than the sudden departure of Dr Rush. His merit as...
I hope you will not think me a Fanatic, because I introduce Clergyman to you. The Truth is that none but Clergymen here have much Litterature or Science, I cannot say that reading and writing is the exclusive Priviledge of Clergy, as it once was in the World; but we bare too near a resemblance to that dark Age—The gentlemen who will have the honour to present this Letter—has given proofs to...
When my Son departed for Russia, I injoined upon him to write nothing to me, which he was not willing should be published in French and English Newspapers. He has very scrupulously observed the rule.— I have been equally reserved in my letters to him: but the Principle on both sides has been to me a cruel privation, for his correspondence when absent, and his Conversation when present has been...
Francis C. Gray a Son of our late Lt. Governor, after an Education at Colledge, two Years travels in Europe under the Protection of your minister in Russia and three Years Study of the Law has been called to the Barr, and now has the laudable curiosity and noble Ambition of seeing his native Country. And who should he naturally wish to see in it so much as its first Magistrate. I hope he will...
Knowing the immense weight of your cares, it gives me pain to interrupt you a moment. But when a young Scholar, Lawyer and amiable character asks an introduction from me I cannot refuse it. Such is George Ticknor Esqr an his travels in his own Country first, and in foreign Countries afterward. He is ranked here, with our Everett & Buckminster, choice spirits, as we think them. With great...
The enclosed letter supposes more importance, in my judgement, than it deserves. Whatever it is worth however, it is all in favour of the request in it. Waterhouse is another Rush; and for no other reason that I can conjecture, than his respect & able services, to the national Government, for the last 14 years, has been cruelly treated by the worst faction against it. I submit the subject, to...
Benjamin Wells Esqr and his Lady are very ambitious of paying their respects to President Madison and his Lady. The Gentleman’s Grandfathers were two as respectable Characters as any in Boston. One of them, Chief Justice Pratt of New York was one of my Patrons at the Barr in 1758; and his Memory will forever be held in veneration by me. The Lady is a Daughter of our late Governor Sumner and a...
I am informed that General Dearborne, Mr Morton and other Gentlemen have recommended Mr Winthop for a Consulate abroad and I am requested to add my testimony to theirs in his favour. My Acquaintanc with him has been only general, but his Father and Grandfather, his Name and Family have been esteemed and Venerated all my Days, his Education was publick, he has travelled in Europe and his moral...
I have So often taken the Liberty to introduce Gentlemen to The President of The United States, that tho’ it might be an usurpation at first, it Seems now to be a kind of Right by Prescription. Upon no Occasion that I recollect, have I assumed this Priviledge with more pleasure than in now introducing Dr James Freeman whom I esteem one of our first litterary Characters and one of the best of...
Thank you for your favour of the 12th. The Anecdote mentioned in my Letter of the 4th of September, is of no consequence to the Public, though, it may interest the private Feelings of your Family and mine. Mr Stodert was my Auther. After all possibility of thinking seriously on the Subject was passed, Mr Stodert informed me of the Letter from Mrs Madison to Mr Steel mentioned in mine to you of...
As I feel a kind of Ambition to introduce to the past present and future Presidents of U.S. Some of our most amiable Men, least bigotted least Superstitious Characters, and most catholic Minds, (in the moral, not Ecclesiastical Sense of the Word) I take the Liberty to introduce to you the Rev. Mr. Henry Colman. As it was known that he intended a Journey to the Southward for his Health which is...
I beg leave to introduce to You Col. William Sumner; and to Mrs Madison, his Sister, Miss Elizabeth Sumner, Children of our late Governor Sumner. They have requested an Introduction from me. And as I think it right that the President should know, and that his Family Should know Something of the Characters who appear at Washington; I beg leave to say, that Mr Sumner has the Advantages of...
As I can make no Apology for so long forgetting to return the volumes inclosed, I must, without qualification beg your pardon. This Work, tho’ it bears the name of Condorcet alone was understood to be written in concert between him and his great Patron, the Duke de la Rochefaucoult, as well as the “New Heaven,” and several other publications in favour of a Government in one center genuine...
Accept my thanks for your favour of last month. The safe Arrival of your books has quieted my conscience. There is nothing within the narrow Compass of human knowledge more interesting, than the Subject of your Letter. If “the Idea of a Government in one Center Seems to be every where exploded” perhaps Something remains undefined, as dangerous, as plausible and pernicious as that Idea. Half a...
Permit me to present you, what I think a Curiosity. Dr Mayhews Thirtieth of January Sermon, preached and printed almost Seventy Years ago. It made a great Sensation in New England: and not a little Noise in old England where Several Editions of it were reprinted and one especially which was inserted in a Collection of Tracts in four Volumes under the Title of “The Pillars of Priestcraft and...
Since the departure of my Brother, Mr: John Q Adams, upon his Mission to Russia, and while he was still yet at sea, I had the pleasure to receive from him a list of names, comprizing the circle of his particular friends to whom he requested I would present, in his name, and as a small token of his respect, a set of Lectures on Rhetorick & Oratory, delivered during the period of his...
I take the Liberty of addressing you in behalf of my Son, now at St Petersburgh, and to ask of you, permission for his return to his native Country. I hope you may have already received, through the Secretary of State, his own request to this effect. From Several Letters which I have received from Mrs Adams, I have been led to think their Situation very unpleasent, as it respected their...
I am informed that among other disagreeable things said about the removal of Congress from Philadelphia it is insinuated that it was a contrivance of some members to get them out of the state of Pensylvania into one of those to which they belonged and I am told that this insinuation has been pointed at me in particular. Though I am persuaded that all distinterested persons will justify...
On my arrival in this city I am more convinced than I was before of the necessity of giving a just state of facts to the public. The current runs strongly against Congress and in a great measure for want of information. When facts are explained they make an impression and incline to conclusions more favourable to us. I have no copy of the reports in my possession, which puts it out of my power...
If Mr. Madison should be disengaged this Evening Mr. Hamilton would be obliged by an opportunity of conversing with him at his lodgings for half an hour. If engaged this Evening he will thank him to say whether tomorrow Evening will suit. AL , James Madison Papers, Library of Congress. H’s note is undated. It probably was written between October, 1787, and March 4, 1788, a period during which...
I have been very delinquent My Dear Sir in not thanking you sooner for your letter from Philadelphia. The remarks you make on a certain subject are important and will be attended to. There is truly much embarrassment in the case. I think however the principles we have talked of, in respect to the legislative authorities, are not only just but will apply to the other departments. Nor will the...
I believe I am in your debt a letter or two, which is owing to my occupations in relation to the elections &c. These are now over in this state, but the result is not known. All depends upon Albany where both sides claim the victory. Our doubts will not be removed till the latter end of the month. I hope your expectations of Virginia have not diminished. Respecting the first volume of Publius...
Some days since I wrote to you, My Dear Sir, inclosing a letter from a Mr. V Der Kemp &c. I then mentioned to you that the question of a majority for or against the constitution would depend upon the County of Albany. By the latter accounts from that quarter I fear much that the issue there has been against us. As Clinton is truly the leader of his party, and is inflexibly obstinate I count...
In my last I think I informed you that the elections had turned out, beyond expectation, favourable to the Antifœderal party. They have a majority of two thirds in the Convention and according to the best estimate I can form of about four sevenths in the community. The views of the leaders in this City are pretty well ascertained to be turned towards a long adjournment say till next spring or...
Yesterday, My Dear Sir, The Convention made a house. That day and this have been spent in preliminary arrangements. Tomorrow we go into a Committee of the whole on the Constitution. There is every appearance that a full discussion will take place, which will keep us together at least a fortnight. It is not easy to conjecture what will be the result. Our adversaries greatly outnumber us. The...
I thank you for your letter of the 9th. instant and am glad to learn that you think the chance is in your favour. I hope no disagreeable change may happen. Yet I own I fear something from your indisposition. Our debate here began on the clause respecting the proportion of representation &c. which has taken up two days. Tomorrow I imagine we shall talk about the power over elections. The only...
I am very sorry to find by your letter of the 13th that your prospects are so critical. Our chance of success here is infinitely slender, and none at all if you go wrong. The leaders of the Antifederalists finding their part seems somewhat squeamish about rejection, are obliged at present to recur to the project of conditional amendments. We are going on very deliberately in the discussion and...
A day or two ago General Schuyler at my request sent forward to you an express with an account of the adoption of the Constitution by New Hampshire. We eagerly wait for further intelligence from you, as our only chance of success depends on you. There are some slight symptoms of relaxation in some of the leaders; which authorises a gleam of hope, if you do well; but certainly I think not...
Your letter of the 20th. came to hand two days since. I regret that your prospects were not yet reduced to greater certainty. There is more and more reason to believe that our conduct will be influenced by yours. Our discussions have not yet travelled beyond the power of taxation. To day we shall probably quit this ground to pass to another. Our arguments confound, but do not convince. Some of...
I felicitate you sincerely on the event in Virginia; but my satisfaction will be allayed, if I discover too much facility in the business of amendment-making. I fear the system will be wounded in some of its vital parts by too general a concurrence in some very injudicious recommendations. I allude more particularly to the power of taxation. The more I consider requisition in any shape the...
I thank you My Dear Sir for yours by the post. Yesterday I communicated to Duer our situation which I presume he will have communicated to you. It remains exactly the same, no further question having been taken. I fear the footing mentioned in my letter to Duer is the best upon which it can be placed; but every thing possible will yet be attempted to bring the party from that stand to an...
I wrote to you by the last post since which nothing material has turned up here. We are debating on amendments without having decided what is to be done with them. There is so great a diversity in the views of our opponents that it is impossible to predict any thing. Upon the whole however our fears diminish. Yrs. Affecly I take the liberty for certain reasons to put the inclosed under cover...
I thank you My Dear Sir for yours of the 20th. The only part of it which surprises me is what you mention respecting Clinton. I cannot however believe that the plan will succeed. Nor indeed do I think that Clinton would be disposed to exchange his present appointment for that office or to risk his popularity by holding both. At the same time the attempt merits attention and ought not to be...
I thank you My Dear Sir for the line you was so obliging as to leave for me and for the loan of the book accompanying it; in which I have not yet made sufficient progress to judge of its merit. I dont know how it was but I took it for granted that you had left town much earlier than you did; else I should have found an opportunity after your adjournment to converse with you on the subjects...
You will oblige me by taking the trouble to peruse the Report which accompanies this; and if the weather permit, I will call upon you sometime tomorrow or next day to converse on the subject of it. I remain with great esteem and regard   D Sir Yr Obed ser It will not be disagreeable to me if after perusal you hand it over to Mr. Jefferson. ALS , University of Virginia. Presumably this is a...
[ New York, May 20, 1801. On May 26, 1801, Madison wrote to Hamilton : “I have received your letter of the 20th.” Letter not found. ]
[ New York, April 18, 1784. “I take the liberty to introduce him to you, as to one who will be disposed, so far as your situation will permit and the circumstances of the State may render practicable, to patronise any just or equitable claims which he may have upon the State. What those claims are he will himself explain to you, I have assured him that he will find in you a friend to justice...
Can nothing be done in our Assembly for poor Paine? Must the merits, & Services of Common Sense continue to glide down the stream of time, unrewarded by this Country? His writings certainly have had a powerful effect on the public mind; ought they not then to meet an adequate return? He is poor! he is chagreened! and almost, if not altogether, in despair of relief. New York it is true, not the...
After the several conversations we have had on the subject of inland navigation; and the benefits which would, probably, be derived from a commercial intercourse with the Western territory; I shall make no apology for giving you the trouble of the enclosed. It is matter of regret to me, however, that I cannot accompany them with some explanations & observations. It was intended these Papers...
Gentlemen: I returned yesterday from Annapolis, having conducted the Marquis La Fayette that far on his way to New York, and left him proceeding on the road to Baltimore, on Wednesday last. This trip afforded me opportunities of conversing with some of the leading characters in the different branches of the Legislature of Maryland, on the subject of inland navigation, and the benefits which...