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Resolved that the Rector be authorized to appoint to the Chair of Antient Languages, for the term of one year from the date of Such appointment, with a salary not exceeding $1000, & with the usual fees paid to that chair, either of the following persons, they being preferred by the Board in the order herein named; that is to say: Dr Gessner Harrison, M. L. Tracie, R. Reynolds; and if neither...
I have been informed, that a paper addressed to the President of the United States is privately circulating in this Territory for signatures, and as it is said to contain charges derogatory to my character, I respectfully request and should esteem it as a particular favor, to be furnished with a copy (as I cannot procure a sight of it here,) as soon after its arrival at Washington City as may...
Ca. 28 October 1811, Washington. The memorialists have learned that “in the allotments of the military Divisions of Washington City,” they have been assigned to the command of Joseph Wheaton. They point out that “efficient organization” requires that “those who are appointed to places of Command, should enjoy the respect and esteem of those who by law are bound to obey,” and that “without this...
I have to inform you of my arrival from Cayenne, which place I left on the 9th. of April last. On my arrival at that Port which was on the 5th. Feby. 1802 I waited upon the Governor Victor Hugues and acquainted him of my appointment as Vice Commercial Agent of the United States for the Port of Cayenne &c. The Governor observed to me that he was not authorised to receive an Agent from the...
28 June 1802, Providence. Informs JM that he left Cayenne on 9 Apr. “On my arrival at that Port which was on the 5th. Feby 1802 I waited upon the Governor Victor Hugues and acquainted him of my appointment as Vice Commercial Agent of the United States.… The Governor observed to me that he was not authorised to receive an Agent from the United States, as he conceived the American Government had...
I have the honor of acknowledging the receipt of your letter enclosing my Commission as vice Commercial Agent for the Port of Cayenne, and agreeable to your directions I herewith transmit the Bond required by Law previous to entering on the execution of the trusts of said office, the duties of which I shall endeavor to execute to the best of my abilities. I have the honor to be very...
18 August 1801, Warwick, Rhode Island. Acknowledges receipt of JM’s letter enclosing his commission as vice commercial agent for Cayenne. Sends required bond. RC ( DNA : RG 59, CD , Cayenne, vol. 1). 1 p.; docketed by Wagner as received 26 Aug., with his notation: “for the Secretary of state’s approbation.” Enclosure not found. Aborn had probably received a copy of JM’s 10 June 1801 standing...
I addressd. your excellency a few days ago on the rumourd. defeat and Surrender of Genl. Hull’s Army. Since which we have recd. the detail and it appears that the British have got possession of the important post of Detroit in the usual way. Can any faith be held with a Nation So lost to every principle of honor, and So degenerated as to employ no other weapons but bribery, corruption , and...
Alarming intiligence which we have Just recd. induces me to call upon the attention of your excellency. Express messengers have arrivd. who bring the dreadful information that Genl Hull and his Army ; have been Captured by the British and Indians after a battle, in which 500 of the brave ohio Volunteers were left on the ground to the Scalping knife of the Savage. The immediate causes which led...
At a meeting of Officers of the 14th Division, Penna. Militia, held at the house of Richard Donaldson, in the Borough of Washington, on friday the 20th Instant, for the purpose of considering and suggesting some amendments to the militia System: Genl. Thomas Acheson, was appointed chairman, and Maj Andrew Sutton Secretary. After which the following preamble and resolutions were introduced,...
I have the opertunity of Informing you that I have had the misfortune to loose my Schooner which was Captured By the British on the 26 of Sept Last Being loaded and Bound for Baltimore and sir I hav Bin on Board the British with A civil othority and they informd me that she Dradg her anchors and went on Shore in lin haven Bay in A gaile of wind and that the Virginiaans Stript hir and Cut Away...
Although I have Suffered, (by the hand of lawless power,) Injurys in my person, my reputation and my property; Injurys to me irreparable though unmerited; Yet as an American firmly and unaltrably attached to my Country; and capable of distinguishing in my Judgment and resentments betwixt its Government, & those who may for a time be entrusted to Administer it: I shall always feel it my duty,...
I am informed, that General Dearborne, Mr. ton & other gentlemen have recommended Mr. Winthrop for a Consulate abroad, and I am requested to add my testimony to theirs, in his favour. My acquaintance with him, has been only general, but his father and Grand-Father, his name and family, have been esteemed & venerated, all my days; his education was publick, he has travelled in Europe, & his...
We take the liberty to enclose you a copy of a letter, received from our friends Messrs. Ruys & Zimmerman at Amsterdam, respecting our Ship James Adams, Captain Bangs, which vessel left our capes the 8th. November last, bound for Amsterdam, with a cargo of colonial produce, all american property, accompanied with the proper and usual Certificates of neutrality, as well as those of importation...
I take the Liberty of addressing you in behalf of my son, now at st petersburgh, and to ask of you, permission for his return to his native Country. I hope you may have already received, through the Secretary of State, his own request to this effect. From Several Letters which I have received from Mrs Adams, I have been led to think their Situation very unpleasent, as it respected their...
I take the Liberty of addressing you in behalf of my Son, now at St Petersburgh, and to ask of you, permission for his return to his native Country. I hope you may have already received, through the Secretary of State, his own request to this effect. From Several Letters which I have received from Mrs Adams, I have been led to think their Situation very unpleasent, as it respected their...
The relation in which you stand to the Constitution of the United States has emboldened me to send an humble attempt of mine to defend it. It is with regret that I have seen in the public papers some accounts of your suffering health. This may render the controversies of the day very uninteresting to you—I have only to urge in apology for my intrusion my earnest desire to shew that even if...
22 August 1812. At a meeting of “a large and respectable number” of citizens, “a committee of seven … reported the following preamble and Resolutions, which were adopted with but two dissenting voices.” “At the present important, and momentous Crisis, of our publick affairs, it becomes the duty of every citizen of the United States to express his faith in the Government of his Country, and in...
We have the honor to enclose you a letter from Messr. J. Howard Maront Co merchants madeira accompg. a pipe old wine shipped to our Care for your excellency by request Col. Mc.Pherson Consull of the U. States at that place. We have entered the wine at the Custom House secured the duties & paid the account & Charges of which together with original Cost, and difference of Exch we annex an acct....
We had the honor to receive by the mail of this day, your Excellency’s letter of date the 1st. Current, and beg you to accept our acknowledgements for your promptitude in forwarding us the check for five hundred fifty three Dollars & 80/100 which it contained, and which is in full for the original cost and subsequent Charges on One pipe wine from Madeira. We shall attend very particularly, to...
The Inclosed I have This day received P my fast Sailing Brig Dove, Cap Child from Madiera who has performed his voyage in Less than 3 mo. after being detaind for a considerable time in Madiera. Should you have any occasion for a dispatch vessel, She is at your Command. I will let her go, to any part of the world, at a moderate price, In order to give employ & bread to the Crew who I have had...
When my Son departed for Russia, I enjoined upon him to write nothing to me, which he was not willing Should be published in French and English Newspapers. He has very Scrupulously observed the rule. I have been equally reserved in my letters to him: but the Principle on both Sides has been to me a cruel privation, for his correspondence when Absent, and his Conversation when present has been...
Thank you for your favour of the 12th. The Anecdote mentioned in my Letter of the 4th of September, is of no consequence to the Public, though, it may interest the private Feelings of your Family and mine. Mr Stodert was my Auther. After all possibility of thinking seriously on the Subject was passed, Mr Stodert informed me of the Letter from Mrs Madison to Mr Steel mentioned in mine to you of...
As I feel a kind of Ambition to introduce to the past present & future Presidents of U S. Some of our most amiable Men, least bigotted least Superstitious Characters, and most catholic Minds, (in the moral, not Ecclesiastical Sense of the Word) I take the Liberty to introduce to you The Rev. Mr. Henry Colman. As it was known that he intended a Journey to the Southward for his Health which is...
Yesterday Morning expecting a Letter from Dr Rush I Sent early to the Post Office: but my Messenger brought me a Letter from Dr Waterhouse, which I inclose; having no words of my own to express my Feelings. The Shock was Sudden and unexpected. I had a Letter from Rush dated the 10th.; apparently written in full health and fine Spirits. An unchangeable Friend Ship of thirty Eight Years had...
My Election to the Presidents office, was but by a majority of one or at most two votes. Mr Jeffersons was by no majority of the people and by a majority of one only in the house after thirty or 40 votes had been equally divided between him and Mr Burr. Mr Jeffersons second election was by a great majority and his third would have been by a greater still if he had not declined. Your Election...
Thank you for your favour of the 12th. The Anecdote mentioned in my Letter of the 4th. of September is of no Consequence to the Public, though, it may interest the private Feelings of your Family and mine. Mr. Stodert was my Auther. After all possibility of thinking seriously on the Subject was passed, Mr. Stodert informed me of the Letter from Mrs. Madison to Mr. Steel mentioned in mine to...
Will you be so good as to read the inclosed Letter from Dr. Belknap and tell me, from your Recollection of what passed in Congress in 1779 1780 & 1781, whether there is any Colour for the Imputation cast on our Country by Dr Kippis. I cannot say as Dr Belknap has been informed that Dr Kippis is my Correspondent. I never wrote a Letter to him or received a Letter from him that I recollect.—I...
The inclosed Letter Supposes more importance in my Judgment than it deserves. Whatever it is worth, however, it is all in favour of the request in it. Waterhouse is another Rush: and for no other Reason that I can conjecture than his respect and able Services to the national Government for the last fourteen Years, has been cruelly treated by the worst Faction against it. I Submit the Subject...
I have subscribed with Mr Gray and others a recommendation of Hendrick W Gordon Esquire a copy of which is enclosed. As he requests a seperate Certificate, I enclose his letter and can sincerely say that from an acquaintance with him, of several years, I believe that what is said of him, in the Certificate, and in his letter, to be no more than he deserves; He is a civil, well bred man,...
Accept my thanks for your favour of last month. The safe Arrival of your books has quieted my conscience. There is nothing within the narrow Compass of human knowledge more interesting, than the Subject of your Letter. If “the Idea of a Government in one Center Seems to be every where exploded” perhaps Something remains, undefined, as dangerous, as plausible and pernicious as that Idea. Half a...
Benjamin Wells Esqr. and his Lady are very ambitious of paying their respects to President Madison and his Lady. The Gentleman’s Grandfathers were two as respectable Characters as any in Boston. One of them, Chief Justice Pratt of New York was one of my Patrons at the Barr in 1758; and his Memory will forever be held in Veneration by me. The Lady is a Daughter of our late Governor Sumner and a...
A young Gentleman, and his Father, have requested me to mention his Name to The Secretary of The Navy. I choose rather to mention it to you. The youth has a fine Person, an elegant Figure, a fine Countenance, healthy vigorous and robust. His Education has been Accademical and mercantile in a very respectable House. His Father Served five years in our Revolutionary War, and his Grandfather was...
My Election to the Presidents Office was but by a majority of one, or at most of two Votes. Mr Jeffersons was by no Majority of the People, and by a Majority of one only in the House after Thirty or forty Votes equally divided between him and Mr Burr. Mr Jeffersons Second Election was by a great Majority and his third would have been by a greater Still, if he had not declined. Your Election...
Mr Malcom was three years in my family at Philadelphia as my private Secretary; and during that time his conduct was ingenuous faithful industrious and attentive and entirely to my Satisfaction. His connections in New York were respectable, and his Education to Letters and the Bar regular. Altho, since the dissolution of that connection between him and me there has been no intercourse and very...
I have So often taken the Liberty to introduce Gentlemen to The President of The United States, that tho’ it might be an usurpation at first, it Seems now to be a kind of Right by Prescription. Upon no Occasion that I recollect, have I assumed this Priviledge with more pleasure than in now introducing Dr James Freeman whom I esteem one of our first litterary Characters and one of the best of...
I ought to make an apology to you for the trouble I give you to read so many of my letters upon subjects with which perhaps I should have nothing to do. but as I am requested to give a simple letter of introduction to a gentleman going to Washington, I could not refuse it. Mr Andrew Eliot a respectable Merchant of Boston has a petition to present to the Administration or to the legislature or...
As I feel a kind of Ambition to introduce to the past present and future Presidents of U.S. Some of our most amiable Men, least bigotted least Superstitious Characters, and most catholic Minds, (in the moral, not Ecclesiastical Sense of the Word) I take the Liberty to introduce to you the Rev. Mr. Henry Colman. As it was known that he intended a Journey to the Southward for his Health which is...
The Reverend, Mr Henry Colman of Hingham, my Neighbour and Acquaintance has a Brother, as I am informed, who wishes to be considered as a Candidate, for a Commission in the Army. As the Brother is unknown to me, I can Say nothing of his Pretensions. But I can Say of the Minister, that in point of Taste and Sense he is fit for a Companion of a Jefferson and a Madison, and in point of Learning...
I hope you will not think me a Fanatic, because I introduce Clergymen to you. The Truth is that none but Clergymen here have much Litterature or Science, I cannot say that reading and writing is the exclusive Priviledge of Clergy, as it once was in the World; but we bare too near a resemblance to that dark Age. The Gentleman who will have the honour to present this Letter has given proofs to...
I beg leave to introduce to you Col: William Sumner, and to Mrs Madison his Sister Miss Elisabeth Sumner; children of our late Governor Sumner. They have requested an introduction from me; and as I think it right that the President should know, & that his family should know something of the characters who appear at Washington I beg leave to say that Mr. Sumner has the advantages of Education,...
Mr Malcom was three years in my family at Philadelphia as my private Secretary: and during that time his conduct was ingenuous faithful and industrious, attentive and entirely to my satisfaction. His Connections in New York were respectable and his education to letters, and the bar regular. Altho since the dissolution of that connection between him and me there has been no intercourse, and...
Francis C. Gray a Son of our late Lt. Governor, after an Education at Colledge, two years travels in Europe under the Protection of your Minister in Russia and three years Study of the Law has been called to the Barr, and now has the laudable curiosity and noble Ambition of Seeing his native Country. And who should he naturally wish to see in it so much as its first Magistrate. I hope he will...
By a resolution of the Citizens of Richmond we are authorised to make arrangements for the reception of General La Fayette “in such manner, as may best comport with his convenience and testify the veneration of the Citizens for his character, their sense of his Services and their affection for his person.” It will certainly be highly gratifying as well to the General as to our fellow Citizens...
I was Yesterday honoured with your favour of the fifth inclosing Dr Waterhouses Letter to me of the 23 of April, announcing to me the unexpected and afflicting News of the death of one of my oldest and most intimate Friends Dr Rush. Though I can scarcely look over an Obituary without mourning Some ancient Friend or acquaintance, none has affected me more Sensibly than the Sudden departure of...
I have subscribed with Mr Gray and others a recommendation of Hendrick W Gordon Esquire a copy of which is enclosed. As he requests a separate Certificate, I enclose his letter and can sincerely say that from an acquaintance with him, of several years, I believe that what is said of him, in the Certificate, and in his letter, to be no more than he deserves; He is a civil, well bred man,...
I am very apprehensive that the liberties I so frequently take of writing to you will appear importunate if not impertinent But I beg it may be fully understood that none of my letters are to be answered; and that I shall perfectly acquiesce in your decisions well knowing the multiplicity of Candidates, the difficulty of making the selections & that the President is the only ultimate and...
I am informed that General Dearborne, Mr Morton and other Gentlemen have recommended Mr Winthop for a Consulate abroad and I am requested to add my testimony to theirs in his favour. My Acquaintanc with him has been only general, but his Father and Grandfather, his Name and Family have been esteemed and Venerated all my Days, his Education was publick, he has travelled in Europe and his moral...
Francis C. Gray a Son of our late Lt. Governor, after an Education at Colledge, two Years travels in Europe under the Protection of your minister in Russia and three Years Study of the Law has been called to the Barr, and now has the laudable curiosity and noble Ambition of seeing his native Country. And who should he naturally wish to see in it so much as its first Magistrate. I hope he will...
A young Gentleman, and his Father, have requested me to mention his Name to The Secretary of The Navy. I choose rather to mention it to you. The youth has a fine Person, an elegant Figure, a fine Countenance, healthy vigorous and robust. His Education has been Accademical and mercantile in a very respectable House. His Father Served five years in our Revolutionary War, and his Grandfather was...