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§ From George Washington. Ca. 1789–1796. Three notes requesting consultation with JM on unspecified matters: “Thursday, 9 oclk. “If you could make it convenient to call here before you go to the House, you would oblige me. I want to have some conversation with you on two or three matters. Yrs Affectly.” “Sunday ½ past 7 oclk. “If you have leisure to give the enclosed a reading, and me an...
Letter not found. 3 May 1789. Acknowledged in JM to Pendleton, 17 May 1789 . The list probably kept by Peter Force (DLC: Madison Miscellany) notes that Pendleton wrote a two-page letter to JM from Virginia on this day. The summary reads: “Organization of the new government. Mr. Madison’s proposition for making provision for revenue. Virginia’s disqualifying act. Anti-federal State Elections....
I am obliged by yr. two kind favrs. of the 8th. & 19th. Past. I was indeed surprised, & in some measure Chagrined at the tardy Assembling of the members of the fœdral legislature, betraying a want of Zeal Which is rather unfavorable, tho’ it might, & I hope did, proceed from causes less reprehensible, & which may be manifested by future dilligence. Before this time the Government will have...
Notwithstanding the conviction I am under of the labour which is imposed upon you by Public Individuals as well as public bodies—yet, as you have begun, so I could wish you to finish, the good work in a short reply to the Address of the House of Representatives (which I now enclose) that there may be an accordance in this business. Thursday 12 Oclock, I have appointed to receive the Address....
Mr. Peter Carr will deliver this. He has taken the opportunity of the Spring Vacation, to visit New York, but is apprehensive you may not immedy. recollect him, & has therefore desired me to notify him to you. I am greatly obliged for your Favour of the 19h. Apl., and am happy to find, you have not only entered upon the arduous Task of legislating for this extended Continent, but that there...
Notwithstanding the conviction I am under of the labour which is imposed upon you by Public Individuals as well as public bodies—Yet, as you have began, so I would wish you to finish, the good work in a short reply to the Address of the House of Representatives (which I now enclose) that there may be an accordance in this business. Thursday 12 O’clock, I have appointed to receive the Address....
It was with great pleasure that I received the accounts of your election; this satisfaction has been made compleat by finding so great a majority of friends to the new Government in the list of members. Do not its enemies acknowledge this to be a sufficient evidence of the disposition and sentiments of the people at large? I am more fully satisfied every day that the opposition proceeded in a...
No safe opportunity offering, the letter for Mr. Nelson has not been forwarded, and I shall now reserve it for him untill the chancery term commences which will be in a day or two —those from Mr. Jefferson have been attended to, the one to Dr. Currie I have delivered, that for Mr. Lewis met a ready conveyance by Mr. Bob Nelson who was here, when it came to hand, on his way to Charlottesville,...
The enclosed were communicated to me, as you will perceive, to make a confidential use of—upon receipt of the first letter, I expressed a desire to be informed (if there was nothing improper in it) through what channel the report came, and what reliance could be placed in the authenticity of it—This gave rise to the second letter —As you are upon business which requires every information of...
My last to you was of the 15th. of March. I am now in hourly expectation of recieving my leave of absence. The delay of it a little longer will endanger the throwing my return into the winter, the very idea of which is horror itself to me. I am in hopes this is the last letter I shall have the pleasure of writing you before my departure. The madness of the king of England has gone off, but...