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Mr Malcom was three years in my family at Philadelphia as my private Secretary; and during that time his conduct was ingenuous faithful industrious and attentive and entirely to my Satisfaction. His connections in New York were respectable, and his Education to Letters and the Bar regular. Altho, since the dissolution of that connection between him and me there has been no intercourse and very...
My Election to the Presidents Office was but by a majority of one, or at most of two Votes. Mr Jeffersons was by no Majority of the People, and by a Majority of one only in the House after Thirty or forty Votes equally divided between him and Mr Burr. Mr Jeffersons Second Election was by a great Majority and his third would have been by a greater Still, if he had not declined. Your Election...
A young Gentleman, and his Father, have requested me to mention his Name to The Secretary of The Navy. I choose rather to mention it to you. The youth has a fine Person, an elegant Figure, a fine Countenance, healthy vigorous and robust. His Education has been Accademical and mercantile in a very respectable House. His Father Served five years in our Revolutionary War, and his Grandfather was...
I have subscribed with Mr Gray and others a recommendation of Hendrick W Gordon Esquire a copy of which is enclosed. As he requests a separate Certificate, I enclose his letter and can sincerely say that from an acquaintance with him, of several years, I believe that what is said of him, in the Certificate, and in his letter, to be no more than he deserves; He is a civil, well bred man,...
I am very apprehensive that the liberties I so frequently take of writing to you will appear importunate if not impertinent But I beg it may be fully understood that none of my letters are to be answered; and that I shall perfectly acquiesce in your decisions well knowing the multiplicity of Candidates, the difficulty of making the selections & that the President is the only ultimate and...
The Reverend, Mr Henry Colman of Hingham, my Neighbour and Acquaintance has a Brother, as I am informed, who wishes to be considered as a Candidate, for a Commission in the Army. As the Brother is unknown to me, I can Say nothing of his Pretensions. But I can Say of the Minister, that in point of Taste and Sense he is fit for a Companion of a Jefferson and a Madison, and in point of Learning...
I have been informed that a number of very respectable Gentlemen are desirous of having the Honourable Richard Cutts Esqr of Biddeford in this State appointed to an Office under the Government of the United States, and wish to recommend him accordingly: but are very apprehensive that your delicacy, and nice sense of honour, or regard to your reputation will be an insuperable Obstacle to their...
Yesterday Morning expecting a Letter from Dr Rush I Sent early to the Post Office: but my Messenger brought me a Letter from Dr Waterhouse, which I inclose, having no words of my own to express my Feelings. The Shock was Sudden and unexpected. I had a Letter from Rush dated the 10th., apparently written in full health and fine Spirits. An unchangeable Friendship of thirty Eight Years had...
I ought to make an apology to you for the trouble I give you to read so many of my letters upon subjects with which perhaps I should have nothing to do. but as I am requested to give a simple letter of introduction to a gentleman going to Washington, I could not refuse it. Mr Andrew Eliot a respectable Merchant of Boston has a petition to present to the Administration or to the legislature or...
I was yesterday honoured with the favour of the 5 inclosing Dr Waterhouses letter to me of the 23 of April announcing to me the afflicting news of the death of one of my oldest and most intimate Friends Dr Rush. Though I can scarcely look over an obituary without mourning some ancient friend or acquaintance, none has affected me more sensibly than the sudden departure of Dr Rush. His merit as...
I hope you will not think me a Fanatic, because I introduce Clergyman to you. The Truth is that none but Clergymen here have much Litterature or Science, I cannot say that reading and writing is the exclusive Priviledge of Clergy, as it once was in the World; but we bare too near a resemblance to that dark Age—The gentlemen who will have the honour to present this Letter—has given proofs to...
When my Son departed for Russia, I injoined upon him to write nothing to me, which he was not willing should be published in French and English Newspapers. He has very scrupulously observed the rule.— I have been equally reserved in my letters to him: but the Principle on both sides has been to me a cruel privation, for his correspondence when absent, and his Conversation when present has been...
Francis C. Gray a Son of our late Lt. Governor, after an Education at Colledge, two Years travels in Europe under the Protection of your minister in Russia and three Years Study of the Law has been called to the Barr, and now has the laudable curiosity and noble Ambition of seeing his native Country. And who should he naturally wish to see in it so much as its first Magistrate. I hope he will...
Knowing the immense weight of your cares, it gives me pain to interrupt you a moment. But when a young Scholar, Lawyer and amiable character asks an introduction from me I cannot refuse it. Such is George Ticknor Esqr an his travels in his own Country first, and in foreign Countries afterward. He is ranked here, with our Everett & Buckminster, choice spirits, as we think them. With great...
The enclosed letter supposes more importance, in my judgement, than it deserves. Whatever it is worth however, it is all in favour of the request in it. Waterhouse is another Rush; and for no other reason that I can conjecture, than his respect & able services, to the national Government, for the last 14 years, has been cruelly treated by the worst faction against it. I submit the subject, to...
Benjamin Wells Esqr and his Lady are very ambitious of paying their respects to President Madison and his Lady. The Gentleman’s Grandfathers were two as respectable Characters as any in Boston. One of them, Chief Justice Pratt of New York was one of my Patrons at the Barr in 1758; and his Memory will forever be held in veneration by me. The Lady is a Daughter of our late Governor Sumner and a...
I am informed that General Dearborne, Mr Morton and other Gentlemen have recommended Mr Winthop for a Consulate abroad and I am requested to add my testimony to theirs in his favour. My Acquaintanc with him has been only general, but his Father and Grandfather, his Name and Family have been esteemed and Venerated all my Days, his Education was publick, he has travelled in Europe and his moral...
I have So often taken the Liberty to introduce Gentlemen to The President of The United States, that tho’ it might be an usurpation at first, it Seems now to be a kind of Right by Prescription. Upon no Occasion that I recollect, have I assumed this Priviledge with more pleasure than in now introducing Dr James Freeman whom I esteem one of our first litterary Characters and one of the best of...
Thank you for your favour of the 12th. The Anecdote mentioned in my Letter of the 4th of September, is of no consequence to the Public, though, it may interest the private Feelings of your Family and mine. Mr Stodert was my Auther. After all possibility of thinking seriously on the Subject was passed, Mr Stodert informed me of the Letter from Mrs Madison to Mr Steel mentioned in mine to you of...
As I feel a kind of Ambition to introduce to the past present and future Presidents of U.S. Some of our most amiable Men, least bigotted least Superstitious Characters, and most catholic Minds, (in the moral, not Ecclesiastical Sense of the Word) I take the Liberty to introduce to you the Rev. Mr. Henry Colman. As it was known that he intended a Journey to the Southward for his Health which is...
I beg leave to introduce to You Col. William Sumner; and to Mrs Madison, his Sister, Miss Elizabeth Sumner, Children of our late Governor Sumner. They have requested an Introduction from me. And as I think it right that the President should know, and that his Family Should know Something of the Characters who appear at Washington; I beg leave to say, that Mr Sumner has the Advantages of...
Since the departure of my Brother, Mr: John Q Adams, upon his Mission to Russia, and while he was still yet at sea, I had the pleasure to receive from him a list of names, comprizing the circle of his particular friends to whom he requested I would present, in his name, and as a small token of his respect, a set of Lectures on Rhetorick & Oratory, delivered during the period of his...
I take the Liberty of addressing you in behalf of my Son, now at St Petersburgh, and to ask of you, permission for his return to his native Country. I hope you may have already received, through the Secretary of State, his own request to this effect. From Several Letters which I have received from Mrs Adams, I have been led to think their Situation very unpleasent, as it respected their...
It is with extreme Satisfaction that I do my self the honour to address you as President of these United States; to see Merit, Virtue & Benevolence thus rewarded, my gratefull heart cannot help to rejoice at; your indulgence & friendly Offices have saved me from ruin & my Duty & Inclination prompts me to pray to God Almighty that your health be adequate to the arduous task Providence has...
Mr Troups complts to Mr Madison—incloses a paper to which the names of several respectable gentlemen are subscribed—Mr T feels himself obliged to state to Mr M that he has taken this liberty with Dr Kirkpatrick without his knowledge & without the knowledge of any other with one exception than those whose signatures appear on it. Our friend Doctor Kirkpatrick retires from Congress under...
4 March 1809, New Boston, New Hampshire. Has invented a system of medicine that will cure soldiers and sailors “of all camp sicknesses” and seeks a government subsidy to manufacture and bottle his medicines. “I hope if I have done no other good by writing this letter it will be pleasing to your phylanthropick mind to be informed of the thriving of us[e]ful arts in our land so as to prevent the...
4 March 1809, Newark. Congratulates JM on becoming president and anticipates “the same moderate, prudent, & pacific course” as that pursued by Jefferson. Expresses regret that the times are “fraught with great peril” brought on by “the folly and arrogance of one belligerent, & the commercial cupidity of the other.” If the choice comes to “honorable war or tame submission, we hesitate not, to...
4 March 1809. With Dr. John Thomas presiding and Cornelius Comegys serving as secretary the citizens offer JM congratulations upon his taking “the presidential chair” and hail the continuance of republicanism as it was practiced under President Jefferson. “Although a wise and just policy has thus preserved us from the political vortex of Europe,” the war now waging there constitutes a threat...
Document not found. 4 March 1809, Lancaster, Kentucky. Acknowledged in JM to the chairman of the meeting, 29 Apr. 1809 . A set of resolutions lauding JM on his inauguration and expressing a willingness to support the administration against foes at home and abroad.
I send you a march which I composed in your honor, I take the liberty to offer it to you as the tribute of a Stranger to your eminent talents and patriotism which brought you to the first seat of these united States. It is only a march, but in the scale of society, who pay his Share of talents and usefulness to the common good, has done his duty; as the head of this Enlightened Republic, I...
Yr. speech which reached here last night is so far as my information reaches much approved, for its modesty & generality & reserve of promises. A few think you might have well avoided that positive decleration about impartiality of the late admn. to foreign nations, as the public mind is divided on that question & the published state documents authorize a great deal to be said in contradiction...
Very seldom did I ever ask the attention of the President of the U States to any Candidate for office in those days when my recommendation would have weight. Nor should I now do it, was I not thoroughly convinced from my long knowledge of yr. goodness that you would take pleasure when proper, to recollect those who have been like myself always personally attached to you, especially when they...
James W. Moss e[s] quire now of Mason County in this State has made some arrangements to move to that part of the Indiana Territory which appears by a late law of Congress to be made a Separate Territory. He has suggested to me a wish to recieve some secondary appointment in the Illinois Territory, such as Secretary, Register or reciever of public Monies or indeed any other you might please to...
6 March 1809, Hager’s Town. The “republican Citizens” of Washington County met at the courthouse on 4 Mar. to celebrate the eighth anniversary of the day when “ correct principles ” triumphed over “a party , whose obnoxious measures whilst in power deservedly lost them the confidence of the people; and also to celebrate this day , upon which Jas. Maddison is exalted to the presidential chair.”...
Before this you will have seen the proceedings of the Legislature of this State. It is with much satisfaction I inform you that they are read with indignation and abhorrence by evry friend of the administration. There is but one sentiment among us that they are treasonable in principle. I am confident many very many of our opponents will not justify the measures. We will support the...
The undersigned practising Attornies at law within the Mississippi Territory beg leave respectfully to represent to your excellency that they Consider it Compatible with the privileges of free men to express their Opinions on Subjects interesting to themselves; and the Community in which they live. They have learned that one of the Judges of this Territory has resigned and that, that office is...
8 March 1809, London. He has written Lord Grenville regarding inconsistencies in the parliamentary debates over the naval blockade, the enforcement of which has exceeded “the rule of the War of 1756.” He attended the debates where Rose and Canning spoke, the latter saying with “the most consummate Impudence” that he would not discuss the state of American negotiations. Joy took “copious Notes”...
Agreeably to your instructions, I have made arrangements to provide the most necessary articles of furniture required for the President’s house. The first and most expensive of these are Looking Glasses of large dimensions. I have already purchased conditionally 3 pair, the largest of which is 8 ft. 6 in in highth, and I have in view one other pair, of very considerable highth & width. The...
It might be expected that a woman & a stranger shou’d apologize for the freedom of addressing The President Of The United States—but, my dear Sir, I never made an apology in my life, and it wou’d take me longer to frame one than to write the petition which will be the subject of this address. It is in behalf of Col Burr—to whom it is but just to declare, that I act without his authority, or...
Prevented by a severe cold from paying You my Congratulations, personally, on the 4th of March, I requested our mutual Friend Mr Deblois to present them, hoping, ere’ this day, to have had the pleasure of renewing them myself. As the weather & roads still keep me from that satisfaction, I cannot longer delay begging You to accept my sincere professions of Joy on Your being placed at the Head...
11 March 1809, London. Reports that at least eight ships from America have recently arrived in a British port in violation of the Embargo. Seeks appointment for himself and Samuel Williams as commercial agents for U.S. in London. Williams is known as an honorable man on the exchange and would be a valuable representative, particularly if Joy’s business took him elsewhere. RC ( DNA : RG 59,...
11 March 1809, New Orleans. Congratulates JM upon his inauguration and asks for the same “Solicitude paternelle” for the convent’s work in educating the young as was enjoyed during the Jefferson administration. RC ( DLC ). 2 pp. Written in French and signed: “ Sr. de St. Xavier farjon / Superieure des Religieuses ursuline .” Docketed by JM. Enclosed in W. C. C. Claiborne to JM, 20 Mar. 1809 .
Immediately after the affair of the Chesapeake (July 4th.) I went to Mr. Jefferson, making him a tender of my personal services. As our country seems yet to be menaced by foreign powers, I still hold it my duty to continue that offer, which I now do to you as President of the United States. I do it the more cheerfully because I am not unknown to you personally. I shall always feel a sincere...
Previously to the establishment of arrangements for carrying on the work during the ensuing Season, I beg to lay before you a proposition of which I hope to receive your approbation, and which I beg specially to explain on account of the personal interest I appear to have in it. Independently of my Salary, the expenses of the direction of the public works have been, Salary of the Clerk of the...
Although I have not the honor of a personal acquaintance with you, duty and affection prompt me to address you, in sincere Congratulation, on the triumph of principal, in the recent Election of President, and Vice President, of the United States. Having been Contemporary, with Hancock, the Adams’s, Warrens and others, in the Councils of this now State, in those “times which tried mens souls,”...
Retired as I live from the political World, and devoted as I am Obliged to be to the duties of my profession, I have not been an indifferent Spectator of the events Which have elevated you to the Chair of the United States. Permit me to express, not only the pleasure I feel in common with a great majority of your fellow Citizens, but to unite my Congratulations with those of your early and...
Letter not found. 13 March 1809. Mentioned in Edwards to JM, 18 May 1809 . Discusses complaints against Joseph Willcox, federal marshal for Connecticut, and recommends that John Brainard be appointed in his place.
I had the honor to write to you unofficially & very much at large on the 12t Jany; it will not be necessary, & may not be proper, for me to trouble you at present in the same manner; indeed I am not able to add anything of consequence to whatever information is contained in my official letter to the secretary of State of this date: As I think it however proper to explain particularly the...
G Granger presents his most respectfull compliments to the President and, at the request of the Citizens of the County of Muskingum in Ohio, incloses for his perusal some resolutions passed by the Citizens on the 25th. of Feb. A copy has been sent to the Intelligencer for publication. At a meeting of a respectable number of the Citezens of the County of Muskingum and State of Ohio agreeable to...
The plan on which the Presidents square is proposed to be planted having been approved by the late President U.S. I had given the necessary directions prior to the 4th. of March last. The principal work which will be done during my departure will be the planting of trees & shrubs near the outer Wall as far as the Ground is finished, the manuring such parts as were omitted on account of the...