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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Madison, James" AND Period="Confederation Period"
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RC ( LC : Madison Papers). Salutation, “The Honbl Mr. Madison.” Cover addressed to “The Honorable Mr. Madison Princeton. Honored by Major Sergant.” Docketed by JM, “Institution of the Cincinnati from E. Haskill Sepr. 12. 1783.” “Sergant” was probably Major Winthrop Sargent (1753–1820). Between 1787 and 1801 he was successively the surveyor, secretary, and governor of the Northwest Territory....
RC (Harvard College Library: Dearborn Papers). Addressed in the hand of a clerk, probably George Hay, “To James Madison. Sept 13th: 1783,” and almost certainly enclosed by Randolph in his longer letter of the same date to JM ( q.v. ). If your attention to congressional business, and your cramped situation will allow you to shew civilities to a new acquaintance, I must consign Mr. Francis...
RC ( LC : Madison Papers). Unsigned, but in Randolph’s hand. Cover addressed by him to “The honble James Madison jr. esq of Congress Princeton.” Docketed by JM, “Sepr. 13. 1783 E.R.” The bracketed letters are those excised from the manuscript by an overly close cropping, especially along the right margin of the second folio. Norfolk and its neighbourhood are I fear, doomed to perpetual...
Summary ( LC : Madison Miscellany). Copied from a calendar, probably prepared about 1850 by Peter Force’s clerk. He noted that the manuscript of the letter, addressed “To James Madison,” consisted of “1 page 4°.” Recovery from illness. Sir Guy Carlton. The people Eastward averse to the half-pay, or commutation. The British restrictive proclamation. Pendleton probably referred to his own...
I am now, tho’ in a feeble state, just able to acknowledge the receipt of yr. two favrs. of the 8th. & 13th., a smart fever prevented my writing by Last post, which I hope the Bark has removed. Sr. Guy Carltons Enquiry into the forgery had probably a double view of screening the Offenders, & of exposing his predecessors in Office, I fear nothing of Justice entered into his motives. I am sorry...
Printed excerpt (Stan. V. Henkels Catalogue No. 694 [1892], p. 94). About 1850 the present letter was calendared, probably by a clerk of Peter Force, as follows: “Garrisons in time of peace. A standing army the bane of society. Should garrisons be Continental or supported by the States where located. German-Town as a seat for the Government merely another name for Philadelphia. Trade with...
Since my last yr. sevl. favrs. of Augt. 24th. & 30th. & Sepr. 20th. have reached me, the two former filling up the Chasim I supposed in yr. letters. The question touching Garrison’s in time of peace, is in it’s nature delicate as well as difficult, and therefore I don’t Wonder there should be diversity of Opinions about it. They seem useful & indeed necessary, & yet have their certain evils,...
Summary ( LC : Madison Miscellany). The summary is in a calendar, probably prepared about 1850 by Peter Force’s clerk. He noted that the letter was addressed “To James Madison” and that the manuscript was “1 page 4°.” Madison’s retirement from Congress. Congress has fixed its permanent residence in the woods of the Jersies. The importance of Madison taking a seat in the Virginia Assembly....
I am now, probably for the last time, to pay you my respects, as the time approaches fast (too fast) when you are to quit Congress, & return to yr. Countrey & friends—pray accept my warmest acknowledgements for the pleasure you have afforded me in continuing a long Correspondence, upon such disadvantageous terms, as my Sterile returns occasioned: however I did my best, & you accepted it; and...
RC ( LC : Madison Papers). Cover missing. Docketed by JM, “Ocr. 30. 1783.” After two or three interruptions on the road by rainy weather I arrived here the 23d. tolerably well two days after Mr. Hardy and Monroe called on me in their way to Philadelphia by whom you will receive this. they hope to find Congress in the City by the time they get up but by your communication received by the Post...