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    • Madison, James
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    • Adams Presidency

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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Madison, James" AND Period="Adams Presidency"
Results 51-60 of 280 sorted by relevance
Mr Macons return to Orange affords me an opportunity of mentioning to you a subject, in which I cannot but feel an interest. Since the assembly rose the executive have appointed me to the office of Attorney General. My acquaintance in the country is not extensive and I must depend upon my friends making my pretensions known to the members of the legislature. If it is compatible with your ideas...
The H. of R. has been in conclave ever since 2. oclock yesterday. At 10. P.M. 17 ballots had been tried, & were invariably 8. 6. & 2 divided. I have not heard from the Capitol this morning. I can venture nothing more by the post but my affectionate salutations, to yourself & mrs. Madison. P. S. 1. P.M. The H. of R. suspended the balloting from 7. to 12. this morning, & after trying a few more...
Although My Acquaintance with you is a Very Small [one] I have taken the liberty To Address you. In Porcupines Paper of 27h. & 28h Decmber is a piece under the Signature (of a True federalist Though a Virginian) Dated the 10h. of December Implicating a Number of My frends Incoludeing you and myself in a Very Scurillious Manner. As I am Not a Publick Speaker on Politicks and Persueing the...
This will be handed you by mr. Erwin, a gentleman of Boston, with whom I became acquainted last winter on a letter of introduction from old Saml. Adams. He is sensible, well informed & strongly republican, wealthy & well allied in his own state & in England. He calls to pay his respects to you. I inclose you two letters which the Govr. sent me by him for perusal. It is a pity that a part of...
I left Philaa. on the 1st. & arrivd here on the 5. In the morning I shall go to Richmond for a few days to arrange some private matters. The result of the enquiries of the committee has been more favourable than I expected, and will be a bitter pill to the British minister, our Secretary of state & their faction. We have deemd it proper not to make our proceedings public, untill laid before...
Not hearing from you at the District Court respecting the Bills in Chancery I delivered from my Neighbours Colo. Taylor & Mjr. Croghan, have sent the Bearer to bring any commands you may favor them with by me. I think I mentioned to you the wish of Colo. Taylor for you to correct any impropriety in the Bills & return them with the Answers, as from that circumstance they have not yet been...
The moment no doubt is approaching, when we have reason to expect a change in Administration—under the present, I can never obtain a favor, my political opinions & sentiments are too well understood, to promise any thing, unless they are relinquished which never can be—but the period I hope is not far distant when Republicans will have the Government of this Country in their hands, & the idea...
If any information it may be in my power to furnish you or any services I can render you here, should be deemed by you a sufficient equivalent, I shall be happy in future in being numbered among your correspondents. The present moment however affords nothing interesting. The fate of Mr Nicholas’s motion for disbanding the additional army, you will have seen in the newspapers. As also the...
This will find you on your farm & I hope with restord health. According to practice we have had a bankrupt law before us for many days. The final question on it is pospond untill tuesday week, & the fate of it uncertain —tho I much fear that it will pass—you well know what they can do by time—there was a majority of 20 agt it when introducd. You observe by the papers that there is a small...
I now send by Bp. Madison the balance which should have gone from our last court by mr Barber: but not seeing him the first day of the court, & that breaking up on the first day contrary to usage & universal expectation, mr Barber was gone before I knew that fact.—is it not strange the public should have no information of the proceedings & prospects of our envoys in a case so vitally...