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    • Jefferson, Thomas
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    • Madison, James
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    • post-Madison Presidency

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Documents filtered by: Author="Jefferson, Thomas" AND Recipient="Madison, James" AND Period="post-Madison Presidency"
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You will see by the inclosed letter from mr Cabell that a project is in agitation respecting W m & Mary College, which gives him much alarm. I communicate to you the letter, as he requests, and with it my answer, as shewing the point in which I view it. I will ask their return, when read, that I may be able to lodge my answer in Richmond before his arrival there. On the question of engaging a...
George Tucker accepts, as you know, and will be in place early in April. Emmet accepts and will be here about the same time. Henry St. George Tucker declines, expressly on the grounds of the local attachments of his family, with abundance of thanks Etc. to the Visitors; Barbour throws a greedy grapple at both places. I inclose you his letter and my answer. I have still some hope that when he...
I send you two letters of Dr. Cooper for perusal. Altho’ the trustees of that College and the Legislature have supported him most triumphantly against his clerical persecutors, yet it is evident he does not feel himself secure. I think you will see from these letters that he keeps us in his eye. And altho’ I doubt, were he now offered a place here, whether he would think he could accept it...
I inclose you a letter from D r Cooper , considerably important to the first successes of our college. I will request you to return it to me. I inclose also the answer which I think should be given. if you think so likewise be so good as to seal & forward it. if not, return it, as I should be unwilling to take on myself alone so important a relinquishment. yet I think it right that we should...
I have for some time considered the question of Internal improvemt as desparate. the torrent of general opinion sets so strongly in favor of it as to be irresistable. and I suppose that even the opposition in Congress will hereafter be merely formal, unless something can be done which may give a gleam of encoragement to our friends, or alarm their opponents in their fancied security. I learn...
Within 6. hours after we had all dispersed yesterday to our several homes, the inclosed most unwelcome letter came to hand. I have never recieved a greater damper on my hopes and spirits. it is so contrary to the state of things as given us by Ticknor, a state which I cannot but still respect, because he had staid many months at each of those places. Gilmer says there are Professors who...
I concur with entire satisfaction in your amendment of my resolution, and am peculiarly pleased with your insertion of Genl Wash’ns addresses, which had not occurred to me or I should have referred to them also. I send you another letter of mr. Cabell’s which I think you will read with pleasure. Affectionate salutations. RC ( DLC : Rives Collection, Madison Papers); draft ( DLC : Jefferson...
I have got thro’ my catalogue except the Alphabet and send you the result. the inclosed table shews the number, size, and cost of the whole and it’s parts. 6860. vols will cost 24,076 D. or 3 1\2 D. a vol. on an average of all sizes. if we get our 50. M D and also if 10,000 would do for apparatus, these would remain 16,000. to invest in stock. this would give us 1000 D. a year for ever which...
I send you a mass of reading, and so rapidly does my hand fail me in writing that I can give but very briefly the necessary explanations. You will observe that mr. Cabell, if the loan bill should pass, proposes to come up with mr. Loyall, probably mr. Johnson, and Genl. Cocke to have a special meeting. This is necessary to engage our workmen before they undertake other work for the ensuing...
The anxieties expressed in the inclosed letter are pointed to 3. articles. 1. the size of the lecturing rooms. 2. depositories for the Apparatuses. 3. the arrangement of the seats for the Students. 1. If we could have foretold what number of students would come to our University, and what proportion of them would be in attendance on any one Professor at one time, lecturing rooms might have...