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    • Jefferson, Thomas
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    • Madison, James
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    • post-Madison Presidency

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Documents filtered by: Author="Jefferson, Thomas" AND Recipient="Madison, James" AND Period="post-Madison Presidency"
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I return your letter to the President, and that of mr. Rush to you, with thanks for the communication. The matters which mr. Rush states as under consideration with the British government are very interesting. But that about the navigation of the St. Laurence and the Missisipi, I would rather they would let alone. The navigation of the former, since the N.Y. canal, is of too little interest to...
My Circular was answered by Genl. Breckenridge, approving, as we had done, of the immediate appointment of Terril to the chair of Law, but our 4. colleagues, who were together in Richmond, concluded not to appoint until our meeting in April. In the meantime the term of the present lamented incumbent draws near to a close. About 150. students have already entered, many of those who engaged for...
I thank you for the communication of mr. Rush’s letter which I now return. Mr. Bentham’s character of Alexander is I believe just and that worse traits might still be added to it equally just. He is now certainly become the watchman of tyranny for Europe, as dear to it’s oppressors as detestable to the oppressed. If however he should engage in war with the Turks, as I expect, his employment...
With this letter I commit for you to the mail a bundle of seeds, one parcel of which was sent by you to mr. Randolph for inspection. The other is seakale seed lodged here for you by Genl. Cocke. Have I returned your Vitruvius to you? I am in great tribulation about it? I keep my borrowed books on a particular shelf that they may neither be forgotten nor confounded with my own. It is not on...
I have read mr. Cox’s letters and some of his papers, which I now return you. It is impossible for me to write to him. With two crippled hands I abandon writing but from the most urgent necessities; and above all things I should not meddle in a Presidential election, nor even express a sentiment on the subject of the Candidates. As you propose to write to him, will you be so good as to add a...
I would have accompanied the General to-day but for two reasons, I have not strength, and I should only have added to your embarrasmts. He leaves you Friday morning to partake of a dinner and ball at Fredsbg. on Saturday. The miss Wrights are detained here by the sickness of one of them. They go hence to the Natural bridge and return to Washington by Staunton, Winchester & Harper’s ferry. No...
You will see by the inclosed letter from mr. Cabell that a project is in agitation respecting Wm. & Mary Coll. which gives him much alarm. I communicate to you the letter as he requests, and with it my answer, as shewing the point in which I view it. I will ask their return when read, that I may be enabled to lodge my answer in Richmd. before his arrival there. On the question of engaging a...
Our Colleagues on the legislature have called a meeting of the Visitors for the 4 th of March. I presume they have notified you of it by mail; but lest they should not have done so, I have thought it safe to inform you. Our newly arrived Professors will come up in our Thursday’s stage. mr Cabell writes me that they were much pleased with them in Richmond. we are equally so with the two here. I...
The inclosed letter to mr. Cabell so fully explains it’s object, and the grounds on which your signature to the paper is proposed if approved, that I will spare my stiffening & aching wrist the pain of adding more than the assurance of my constant & affectte. friendship. We the subscribers, visitors of the University of Virginia being of opinion that it will be to the interest of that...
Your letter of Feb. 15. having given me the hope you would attend the meeting of the Visitors of the Central college near Charlottesville I lodged one for you at Montpelier notifying that our meeting would be on the day after our April court. a detention at Washington I presume prevented your attendance, and mr Watson being sick, only Gen l Cocke , mr Cabell