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    • Erving, George W.
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    • Madison, James

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Documents filtered by: Author="Erving, George W." AND Recipient="Madison, James"
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I had taken my passage & actually Embarked for England on board a merchant ship from this Port but I found the accommodations so uncomfortable, & the decks so dangerously lumbered with Cotton, that I thought it best to return & take passage in the English Packet which sails without fail to morrow morning; in this mode of conveyance I am subject to a probability of some delay, but taking all...
29 September 1801, London. No. 1. Reports his arrival at Falmouth on 16 Sept. and at London on 20 Sept. Immediately delivered commission, instructions, and JM’s dispatches to Rufus King. Williams will continue in post until Erving obtains exequatur. Has asked Williams, who has provided all information requested, to arrange papers in easily understood sequence; will then prepare statement on...
I have the honor to inform you that I arrived at Falmouth on the 16th., at this place on the 20th. Inst. I immediately waited upon Mr. King with your dis patches: I delivered to him also my commission & com municated your instructions as directed. Ow ing I presume to the great pressure of various con cerns upon the new administration I have not yet obtained my exsequatur, & that the business...
4 October 1801, London. Reports that on 2 Oct. Great Britain and France announced signing of peace preliminaries. Believes news of French surrender at Alexandria hastened this event. Relates unconfirmed rumor that the preliminaries provide for a French guarantee of the integrity of the Turkish Empire (which must include the surrender of Egypt) and also for the security of the Kingdom of...
By Mr Dawson who left us a few days since I had the honor of writing to you (No 1 Sepr 29t) since when (on the 8t Inst) I have received my Exequatur from the government here, & from my predecessor the remaining papers belonging to the Agency. The high Court of appeals will commence their sittings in Novr. and you may depend upon my paying the strictest & most unremitted attention to the...
20 October 1801, London. No. 3. Has received JM’s 1 Aug. circular and will follow instructions “with the utmost attention.” Will be unable to comply strictly with consular instruction requiring semiannual account of American vessels arriving in port as “not one in twenty of the Captains who arrive here, ever present themselves to the Consul” unless certificate of cargo’s being landed is...
20 October 1801, London. Asks JM to read accompanying letter to Gallatin [not found]; hopes he “will not suppose private Emolument to have been my principal inducement to the proposition which it contains.” Discusses current low income from consular fees, which will be even lower after peace; British notaries maneuver to deprive consuls of fees on stock transfers, which are numerous. Observes...
I have this day received your ci rcular of the 1st: Augst:. The instructions and directions which it contains in all cases which occur shall meet with the u tmost attention. I wish it were possible in this place, to c omply strictly also with the general instructions to Consuls, which require that a semi-annual Accot: should be transmitted to the Department of State of all the American Vessels...
31 October 1801, American Consulate, London. No. 4. Dawson’s delayed departure and return to London a second time allow transmission of the enclosed statements. RC and enclosures ( DNA : RG 59, CD , London, vol. 8). RC 1 p.; docketed by Wagner as received 13 Jan. The enclosures include lists of awards made by the Board of Commissioners payable on 5 July 1798 and 1 May 1799 and received by...
The disappointment of Mr. Dawson as to h is passage, & his consequent return to London a se cond time, Enables me to forward by him the en closed statements; not having expected so immediate and favorable opportunity I have been so mewhat hurried; a further & more minute ex amination may discover some small Errors or omissions. Th ere can be scarcely any such that are important. I hope these...
1 November 1801, London. Private No. 3. Hopes papers conveyed by Dawson will provide president with desired information; they show amounts received under the commission and actual government expenses, and they also provide data for an estimate of costs to prosecute remaining claims. Total expenses cannot be ascertained as many cases were handled by private agents, but Erving reckons they will...
I hope that the papers which I have forwarded by Mr. Dawson may furnish the kind of information wh ich the President desired to have; they shew what has been received under the commission, & the actual ances of government; & afford data upon which to Estimate the remaining costs of prosecuting the cla ims: there are no documents belonging to the ag ency from which it is possible to collect an...
14 November 1801, London. Private No. 4. Encloses recently published compendium of British commercial statistics. Believes “Mr Luffman’s” favorable representation of British export trade is too optimistic, no allowance being made under imports and exports for those imported goods that are merely lodged in warehouses and promptly exported or for those exports that are seized by the enemy and...
20 November 1801, London. No. 5. Encloses copy [not found] of admiralty proceedings on the New Adventure , [Ebenezer] Shearman master, should JM wish to use it as a basis for prosecution of the owners. Invoice listed value of cargo as $15,000. Condemnation is expected. Recounts report of proposal made to Rufus King to claim the property for the U.S., which would have led to recovery and...
30 November 1801, American Consulate, London. No. 5. Encloses incomplete accounts of proctors for claims cases showing large amounts still due to them. Reports that Slade threatens to resign if not paid, though he has made this threat before. Also encloses duplicates of two of the statements sent in his letter of 31 Oct. Believes that in the statement of awards from the commissioners he may...
I have the honour to inclose herewith a Statement of the demands of the Proctors e mployed in the prosecution of Appeals, with an a ccount of the Monies which they have at several times received: It is not quite exact because Cricket & Townley have not yet delivered in their Bills, nor will be able before Christmas; in every other particular it is c orrect and the supposition made as to the...
Referring to my letter of Novr 30, I inclose a copy of a Sketch which I have sent to Mr King, it does not indeed pretend to be any thing like a correct calculation, but which brings into one view some interesting conjectures that cannot be very wide of the truth; If it be near the truth, it shews that so far from deriving any benefit from the 7t Article, (if we take into view the loss of...
Your sources of intelligence are now so numerous that I hardly Expect an opportunity of making the first communication of important Events; my reflections upon the passing scene, or the political suggestions which it may give rise to, I fear at the best can be of little consideration; & according to the Eccentric course of political Events for these last few years, may more than probably be...
6 March 1802, London. No. 6. Reports the proceedings of the Board of Commissioners under article 7 of the British treaty “respecting one of the appointments in connection with that Board with which the President has been pleased to honor me.” Encloses six related letters and extracts so that “the business may be now fully before you.” Was authorized by JM’s letters of 27 July 1801 to take up...
6 March 1802, London. Private No. 8. Has reported in an accompanying letter “all that has passed upon the subject of my appointment.” Is “perfectly satisfied” with the situation; has full schedule of responsibilities without assessorship. But “upon the score of Emolument—here is certainly a very great deduction without any proportionable deduction of business.” Notes Pinkney’s assertion that...
I think it my duty to make you particularly acquainted with the proceedings of the Commissioners under the 7th. Article of the British Treaty respecting one of the appointments in connection with the Board, with which the President has been pleased to honor me, & that the business may be more fully before you, I have annexed to this the several letters & extracts from No. 1 to 6 inclusive. By...
I had the honor to address you last on the 6th March, since when a great pressure of business consequent upon the ⟨r⟩eassembling of the Board has prevented my writing to you upon ordinary occurrences; When the commissioners reassumed their ⟨f⟩unctions the state in which the cases ⟨b⟩efore them were found seemed to have ⟨r⟩esulted from an Expectation that no adjustment with this government upon...
My last unofficial letter was dated March 6th; not having had the pleasure of hearing from you, & always supposing that my communications may have been found deficient in interest, it is not without apprehension that I again address you: To write too much however is an Error on the right side as long as our correspondent has the priviledge of burning; I conclude too that this may find you at...
21 July 1802, American Consulate, London. Acknowledges receipt of his consular commission and returns his bond. Encloses his account as consul and as agent for the relief and protection of seamen from the time of Lenox’s resignation to 30 June. The balance due him is £186 14 s . 5½ d . sterling. King refused his application for reimbursement of this amount on the grounds that “he has no longer...
I have had the honor of receiving my Commission as Consul for this Port u pon the nomination of the President ratified by the Senate, & in pursuance of your direction return the usual bond herewith. I have also the honor o f inclosing my Account as Consul & as Agent for the relief and protection of Seamen from the time w hen Mr. Lenox resigned this last Employment, to the 30th. June: the...
29 July 1802, American Consulate, London. No. 9. Encloses copies of letters from Simpson and the U.S. consul at Gibraltar announcing the declaration of war against the U.S. by the emperor of Morocco. Has published the information for American citizens in Great Britain and sent word to U.S. consuls in Germany and Holland. Believes the time is “peculiarly favorable for the Extirpation of those...
You will doubtless receive thro’ a variety of channels the declaration of war against the U nited States by the Emperor of Morrocco: The in closed are copies of letters which have come to me upon that subject from Mr. Simpson & from our Co nsul at Gibraltar; in consequence of which as we ll as of information from Mr. King I have published a notification to our citizens here, & forwarded the...
The return of Mr Lewis to Washington affords me an opportunity of acknowledging the rect of your private & friendly letter (May 3d) upon the subject of the assessorship to the board of commissioners; It is unnecessary I hope for me to assure you that I feel on all occasions the most perfect disposition to acquiesce in, & chearfully conform to, the Opinions & wishes of the President & of...
6 September 1802, American Consulate, London. No. 10. “I have just received from our Consul at Cadiz, a Circular letter of which the inclosed is a Copy; since my last of 29th. July upon this subject no other authentic information has been received here.” RC and enclosure ( DNA : RG 59, CD , London, vol. 8). RC 1 p. Enclosure (1 p.) is another copy of Richard O’Brien’s circular letter, 26 June...
I have just received from our Consul at Cadiz, a Circular letter of which the enclosed is a Copy; since my last of 29th. July upon this subject no other authentic intelligence has been received here. I have the honor to be with perfect respect Sir, Your very Obed. Servant The preceding is the full transcription of a document that was previously abstracted in The Papers of James Madison ,...