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    • Erving, George W.
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    • Madison, James

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Documents filtered by: Author="Erving, George W." AND Recipient="Madison, James"
Results 11-20 of 197 sorted by date (ascending)
1 November 1801, London. Private No. 3. Hopes papers conveyed by Dawson will provide president with desired information; they show amounts received under the commission and actual government expenses, and they also provide data for an estimate of costs to prosecute remaining claims. Total expenses cannot be ascertained as many cases were handled by private agents, but Erving reckons they will...
I hope that the papers which I have forwarded by Mr. Dawson may furnish the kind of information wh ich the President desired to have; they shew what has been received under the commission, & the actual ances of government; & afford data upon which to Estimate the remaining costs of prosecuting the cla ims: there are no documents belonging to the ag ency from which it is possible to collect an...
14 November 1801, London. Private No. 4. Encloses recently published compendium of British commercial statistics. Believes “Mr Luffman’s” favorable representation of British export trade is too optimistic, no allowance being made under imports and exports for those imported goods that are merely lodged in warehouses and promptly exported or for those exports that are seized by the enemy and...
20 November 1801, London. No. 5. Encloses copy [not found] of admiralty proceedings on the New Adventure , [Ebenezer] Shearman master, should JM wish to use it as a basis for prosecution of the owners. Invoice listed value of cargo as $15,000. Condemnation is expected. Recounts report of proposal made to Rufus King to claim the property for the U.S., which would have led to recovery and...
30 November 1801, American Consulate, London. No. 5. Encloses incomplete accounts of proctors for claims cases showing large amounts still due to them. Reports that Slade threatens to resign if not paid, though he has made this threat before. Also encloses duplicates of two of the statements sent in his letter of 31 Oct. Believes that in the statement of awards from the commissioners he may...
I have the honour to inclose herewith a Statement of the demands of the Proctors e mployed in the prosecution of Appeals, with an a ccount of the Monies which they have at several times received: It is not quite exact because Cricket & Townley have not yet delivered in their Bills, nor will be able before Christmas; in every other particular it is c orrect and the supposition made as to the...
Referring to my letter of Novr 30, I inclose a copy of a Sketch which I have sent to Mr King, it does not indeed pretend to be any thing like a correct calculation, but which brings into one view some interesting conjectures that cannot be very wide of the truth; If it be near the truth, it shews that so far from deriving any benefit from the 7t Article, (if we take into view the loss of...
Your sources of intelligence are now so numerous that I hardly Expect an opportunity of making the first communication of important Events; my reflections upon the passing scene, or the political suggestions which it may give rise to, I fear at the best can be of little consideration; & according to the Eccentric course of political Events for these last few years, may more than probably be...
6 March 1802, London. No. 6. Reports the proceedings of the Board of Commissioners under article 7 of the British treaty “respecting one of the appointments in connection with that Board with which the President has been pleased to honor me.” Encloses six related letters and extracts so that “the business may be now fully before you.” Was authorized by JM’s letters of 27 July 1801 to take up...
6 March 1802, London. Private No. 8. Has reported in an accompanying letter “all that has passed upon the subject of my appointment.” Is “perfectly satisfied” with the situation; has full schedule of responsibilities without assessorship. But “upon the score of Emolument—here is certainly a very great deduction without any proportionable deduction of business.” Notes Pinkney’s assertion that...