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    • Appleton, Thomas
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    • Madison, James

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Documents filtered by: Author="Appleton, Thomas" AND Recipient="Madison, James"
Results 1-30 of 73 sorted by editorial placement
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5 March 1801, Leghorn. Encloses copy of Cathcart’s 3 Jan. circular letter, received on 3 Feb. Has forwarded copies to American consuls in Sicily, Naples, Elba, Genoa, Barcelona, Málaga, and Alicante; believes as a result all Americans now in Mediterranean will avoid capture. Discusses his effort to enlist aid of Belleville, French chargé d’affaires in Tuscany, in persuading pasha to wait...
3 June 1801, Leghorn. Notes that in consequence of Cathcart’s circular letters warning of a war with Tripoli an embargo has been laid on American vessels in Leghorn harbor. Cathcart’s arrival in Leghorn has confirmed the propriety of the measure. Has transmitted Cathcart’s letters to other American consulates in Italy, Spain, and France. Encloses copy of Cathcart’s 2 June circular on Barbary...
9 July 1801, Leghorn. Forwards dispatches from Cathcart and encloses a copy of Cathcart’s circular of 11 May. Notes that in laying embargoes on American shipping consuls in Mediterranean have used their own judgment. Considers that not only would ships and cargoes be endangered by allowing them to depart singly but pasha wants to take captives in order to force his terms on the U.S. These...
10 August 1801, Leghorn. Sent previous dispatch of 9 July by way of Paris, covering dispatches from Cathcart, who is now in Leghorn. Forwards copy of circular letter received from Tunis; has distributed it to foreign consuls in Leghorn and American consuls in Italy, Trieste, Smyrna, France, Spain, Holland, Hamburg, and London. His receipt of timely information from Barbary States and...
28 September 1801, Leghorn. Fears his dispatch of 9 July may have been lost in a postal robbery at Nice. Announces that American ship Columbia and schooner Raven were seized on the suspicion of their being British property but General Murat, on his request, ordered them to be released. Has found Murat to be prompt in responding to requests for favors or justice. Current political situation in...
12 December 1801, Leghorn. Lack of a conveyance to the U.S. has prevented him from writing for over six weeks. The “panic of peace” has suspended commercial negotiations, a situation worsened by the arrival of more U.S. vessels within fifteen days than at any period during his residence. Declares that American trade with Italy, though not extensive, has been “most lucrative” during the past...
15 January 1802, Leghorn. Encloses a list of American vessels in port during the past year [not found], a statement of his expenditures for distressed seamen during the same period [not found], a copy of the Napoleonic constitution accepted by the Republic of Lucca, and an estimate of the empire’s losses during the war. Reduced number of American ships in port results from the British blockade...
20 February 1802, Leghorn. Wrote last on 15 Jan. enclosing list of U.S. shipping and account of expenditures for distressed seamen. His preceding letter [12 Dec.] mentioned the congress at Lyons on the form of government for the Cisalpine Republic. In future, this will be known as the Italian Republic; encloses a copy of the principal articles that form the basis of its constitution. Its...
1 June 1802, Leghorn. Has nothing of note to report except the “great embarkation of french troops in the different ports of Italy,” which required the impressment of “twenty or more vessels of various nations indiscriminately.” Among these was the Syren , Captain Reilly, of Philadelphia. “I remonstrated against the proceedure, and should, I am persuaded have obtained her release from so...
10 July 1802, Leghorn. Reports that on 8 July he was informed by the Danish consul of the arrival of two armed Tripolitan galliots in Algiers; encloses a translation of a letter on the subject and declares that he “lost not a moment” in warning American ships at Leghorn. Encloses a copy of a letter from O’Brien at Algiers, received 9 July, which he forwarded to “all our Consuls on the European...
8 September 1802, Leghorn. “The unhappy situation to which the ships of the UStates are exposed in these seas, has put a stop to almost all our Commerce with this place for the last month.” Forwards letters from Captain Murray of the Constellation to the secretary of the navy and dispatches from Cathcart and refers JM to them for the “actual position” of the U.S. with Tripoli. “The Affairs of...
7 December 1802, Leghorn. Transmits several letters he was asked to forward. Four American seamen captured in the Franklin arrived “a few days since.” He provided them with clothing and put them on board the Syren and Little Robert , both bound for Philadelphia. The number of Tripolitan corsairs out, coupled with the lack of fear of American captains, have “increased my apprehensions for their...
23 May 1803, Leghorn . Encloses a duplicate list of American ships that arrived during 1802. The Adams convoyed several American merchantmen “into these roads,” then left immediately for Malta to avoid the usual fourteen-day quarantine. Has “long in vain endeavoured to diminish the quarantine” for U.S. ships, “but the dread of Contagion countervails all reasoning on the subject,” though...
29 May 1803, Leghorn . Wrote last on 20 May, at which time “there appeared little hopes” either of his obtaining “a diminution of the quarantine of our vessels” or of avoiding storage charges for merchandise that “could not be purified on ship board.” Notes that Leghorn has three lazarettos for “persons arriving from countries infected with contagious disorders” and for “certain descriptions...
4 June 1803, Leghorn . Encloses a duplicate of his letter of 29 May . Reports movement of a division of the French army toward Naples. “A considerable re: inforcement is hourly expected in this city, which is now declared by the Commanding General in a State of Siege; as I presume … every port in Italy.” A “few fortunate adventurers” from the U.S. arrived after the declaration of war and will...
8 July 1803, Leghorn . Encloses his “account of disbursements to distressed American seamen during the preceeding year amounting to” $894.52. “A vast number of Sailors” have resorted to this port “to find vessels returning to the U: States—more than one half the sum I have advanced was to men from Trieste, Naples, the island of Sicily and Genoa.” Has been careful “to discriminate between the...
29 August 1803, Leghorn . Wrote in his last letter about “the situation of our commerce with this port” and in particular about the brig Boston of Philadelphia, which “is still under arrestation.” “The french commercial agent after repeated assurances of speedily examining the papers” determined that they should be examined in Paris, where the whole business should be decided by the tribunal...
7 October 1803, Leghorn . Since his last nothing “of moment” has occurred. “The political situation of Italy wears no new aspect from which can be drawn any satisfactory conclusion as to the final intentions of the first Consul: for his uncontrouled will governs this part of Europe as effectually as it does Paris.” Lord Nelson and his “formidable Squadron” have not yet “performed any act of...
20 January 1804, Leghorn. Encloses a list of American ships sailing from Leghorn during the past six months together with an account of funds advanced to distressed seamen and of postage for public letters amounting to $222.00, for which he has drawn on the State Department in favor of merchant Samuel Emery of Philadelphia. The difference in expenses for seamen between 1803 and 1802 shows the...
3 February 1804, Leghorn. “Having been inform’d by the person who presented for payment my draft on the department of State for disbursements made by me in the year 1802. that the Vouchers were indispensable, I now forward them to you. Many of these documents comprise a variety of charges as they were not paid Seperately; but the whole together I believe will be found to Contain the total...
4 February 1804, Leghorn. Encloses a copy of a letter received “this morning” from Livingston at Paris in reply to Appleton’s information of the loss of the Philadelphia . Livingston “has availed himself of the friendly dispositions of the first consul, to give instructions to his Commissary at Tripoli relative to the American prisoners.” Presumes that Preble is still at Syracuse; therefore,...
13 April 1804, Leghorn. “At the moment of the departure of a Vessel for the U:States, there has been handed me two letters from Como. Preble in date of the 18th. and 19th. of March at Syracuse. As it is among the possible events that he had no opportunity from thence to Convey to you the intelligence he has transmitted me, I avail myself of a Brig bound to Martha’s Vineyard, to forward you...
26 May 1804, Leghorn. “By advices received from Como. Preble it Appears that on the 15th. instant he was Again at Naples, where he had Arrived from Tunis, and was then on the eve of his departure for Malta, with intention to touch at Messina, for the purpose of taking six gun-boats, several Mortars, together with some Amunition which had been loaned by his Sicilian Majesty Agreeably to an...
20 January 1805, Leghorn. Encloses a list of U.S. vessels sailing from Leghorn from 1 July to 31 Dec. 1804, together with his accounts for 1804 and supporting vouchers showing a balance due him of $148.25, for which he has drawn on the State Department in favor of Samuel Emery of Philadelphia. Was informed by Emery that settlement of his account for 1802 has met with “some obstacle,” but Emery...
20 March 1805, Leghorn . “In a letter which I receiv’d a few days since from a friend at Malta in Date of the 25th. of february it appears that Como. Barron was then in a very Dangerous state of health. Yesterday I was informed by a gentleman who left Palermo on the 9th. instant, that the Captain of the british sloop of war the Termigant Assured him, that about three weeks previous he spoke...
11 June 1805, Leghorn . “The immediate departure of a vessel for the U. States furnishes me with an opportunity of forwarding the inclosed which arriv’d this morning. As the considerations which induc’d the Genoese to unite themselves to the french government were in the italian language, I have translated them for your convenience; but the <s>peech of the Doge and reply of the King being in...
§ From Thomas Appleton. 5 July 1805, Leghorn. “My last respects were in date of the 11th. of June, in which I inclos’d a translation into our language of the considerations which the government of Genova publish’d as reasons for annexing their territory to the empire of France. His majesty is now at Genova, but he has not as yet publickly made known the limits of his new Kingdom—very lately he...
§ From Thomas Appleton. 27 February 1806, Leghorn. “I have now the honor to forward you the list of american vessels which sail’d from this port during the ⟨la⟩st six months of the year 1805; as likewise my accounts and vouchers of disbursements to distress’d seamen, and account of postage paid for the Service of the U:States. You will perceive Sir, by the former how considerably our commerce...
§ From Thomas Appleton. 1 April 1806, Leghorn. “I had the honor of addressing you on the 27. february inclosing a list of American Vessels sail’d from this port during the last six months of the year 1805, also my Account of disbursements to distress’d seamen &c. for the year, with their Attendant vouchers. In the course of the last month the U:S. Schooner Captn. Evans arrived here but from a...
I had the Honor of Addressing you on the 12th. of February. On the 3d. Ultimo I receiv’d a Circular letter from Mr. Cathcart American Consul at Tripoli; a copy of which you will find inclosed. The following d ay I forwarded Copies to the ports of Sicily, Naples, Elbe, Genoa, Barcelona, Malaga, and Alicant from which I am induced to beleive, that the Americans now in the Mediterranean, will...