You
have
selected

  • Recipient

    • Livingston, Robert R.

Author

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 10 / Top 11

Period

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Recipient="Livingston, Robert R."
Results 1-50 of 246 sorted by relevance
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
6 June 1802, Department of State. Introduces the bearer, Captain Johnson, who goes to Paris to prosecute the claim of Mr. Dunlap, an Alexandria merchant, against France. Letterbook copy ( DNA : RG 59, IM , vol. 6). 1 p.
I am favor’d with your Letter of the 4 December accompanying one from Mr Morris. I have acquainted that Gentleman by this conveyance that his Resignation is accepted. Tho I regret much the occasion of your leaving Philadelphia I shall be happy to see Mrs Livingston and yourself at this place on your way to the Manor—you will be so obliging as to make Mrs Washingtons respects to Mrs Livingston...
I have been favored with yours of the 25th of Feby. in answer to mine on the subject of the papers in your hands relating to the Ship business of the Legation of the United States at Paris. As it is a task which you can best perform, I request the favor of you to select the papers which may be most properly returned to Paris, and send them to Mr. Gelston to be forwarded to Genl. Armstrong: and...
Your favor of the 2d came to Hand by the last post. Before this Time, you will have seen the report I made to Congress of the Interview with Sir Guy Carleton—I am very sorry the result proved so indecisive—that this, however, arises from the Cause you mention, I am not fully persuaded—I believe, a want of Information from his Court, which had been for some Time without an Administration, has...
It gives me great pleasure to have it in my power to inform you, that Sir Guy Carleton has announced to me his intention, to relinquish the Posts he holds on York Island, as far as McGowens pass inclusive, on the 21st inst., Herricks and Hampstead with all to the Eastward on Long Island on the same day, and if possible to give up the City, with Brooklyn on the day following; and Palus Hook,...
Your Letter of the 16th Inst., I received to day. Tho I am & shall always be happy in your Favors, I feel with you but too sensibly, the cause giving rise to our present intercourse. But we must look forward to more fortunate events—The Evacuation of our posts on the Lake has taken place, and cannot be recalled. Agreable to the Idea you have so obligingly hinted to me, I have written to the...
LS : New-York Historical Society I have just received your No 11. dated the 22d. of May. This Line serves chiefly to recommend to your Civilities two of my English Friends, who will probably pass through Philadelphia in their Way to Virginia. As they are lately from London, they can give you a good Account of the State of Parties there, and the general Disposition of the Nation respecting...
I have to acknowledge, & thank you for your favor of the 16th which covered a Letter from the Marqs de la Fayette dated the 30th of Jany. That letter does not contain any News of considerable moment relative to public affairs—Altho’ the Marquis does not pretend to speak of the plan of the Campaign; his sentiments in general appear to be—That Britain will make a desperate effort to prosecute...
Altho’ I have been very tardy in acknowledging your favors of Jany. 17 & 24th. and the very valuable present from Mrs. E. Livingston, I am not the less sensible of them. I pray you to tender her in my behalf, my sincerest thanks for such a token of her kindness. The cloth has been highly admired both for the manufacture, of which she has the merit, and for the material which affords a specimen...
The inclosed extract of a letter from Mr. Lear to Le Clerc the General in Chief at St. Domingo and of another from the latter to him, will explain an outrage against two respectable American Citizens, one of them lately an Officer in our Navy, which excites no less astonishment as a wanton departure from just principles than indignation as an insult to the United States. I inclose also the...
However great the merits of the Marqs de la Fayette may be. however important his Services to this Country. And however strong my friendship for, and inclination to serve him—it never was my intention to promote his wishes at the expence of the interest, policy, or dignity of our National character. If my last to you therefore, conveyed an idea repugnant to these sentiments, I beg it may be...
The disagreeable events which have taken place in the Pensyla and Jersey lines—the general discontent of the Army for want of pay, cloathing & Provisions—added to the usual course of business (which increases with our perplexities) will, I am perswaded, be admitted as a sufficient apology for my not acknowledging the receipt of your confidential, and obliging letter of the 8th, till now. To...
My letter of the 4th. with a P.S. of the 8th. being delivered to the Captain of the vessel, the object of the present is to inform you that the reports of both those days prove to be unfounded, and that it is questionable whether the marriage spoken of is to take place. you will therefore depend on future evidence as to the fact, & only use the apology if the issue should render it necessary....
While the Qr Master is endeavouring to furnish the bearer (who is said to be charged with important dispatches for Congress from France) with a fresh Horse, I set down to acknowledge, in haste, the Receipt of your favor of the 30th Ulto, & to thank you for the information which it contains. We wanted no fresh opiate to encrease that Stupor into which we had fallen; but I much fear that the...
Two LS , press copies of each LS , and transcript: National Archives I have just received your No. 15. dated the 9th of August, which mentions your not having heard from me since March. I have however written sundry Letters, viz. of Apl. 8th. & 12th. June 25th & 29th, Augt 12th and Sept. 3d, and sent Copies of the same, which I hope cannot all have miscarried. The Negotiations for Peace have...
ALS and transcript: National Archives I but this moment hear of this Opportunity, by which I can only send you a Line to acquaint you, that I have concluded the Treaty with Sweden, which was signed on Wednesday last. You will have a Copy by the first good Opportunity. It differs very little from the Plan sent me,—in nothing material.— The English Court is in Confusion by another Change of...
27 January 1802, Department of State. At the request of Senator Sheafe of New Hampshire, provides this introduction for an agent who will carry claims and documents in support of them from Sheafe to Livingston. Requests Livingston’s “favorable attention to the business.” RC ( DNA : RG 76, France, French Spoliation Claims, box 5); letterbook copy ( DNA : RG 59, IM , vol. 6). 1 p. Sheafe’s agent...
LS and transcript: National Archives Sundry Circumstances occurring since mine of the 5th & 14th. have hitherto retarded the Departure of our Dispatches. They will now go under the Security of a British Passport, be accompanied by a Sum of Money, and by some farther Intelligence from England, which show the still unsettled State of Minds there, and, together with the Difficulties and small...
Your Letters express a Desire that I Should endeavour to form an Acquaintance with the Representatives of Crowned Heads, and you Seem to be of opinion that much may be learned from their Conversation. It is very true that Hints may be dropped, Sometimes which deserve to be attended to, and I Shall not fail to avail myself of every oppertunity of learning any Thing from them, that may occur....
The enclosed N o. 121 of the Politique Hollandais, having translated a few Sentences of mine, and the Author intending to insert more, as he has already inserted a good deal of the Same Correspondence, I think it proper to transmit You, a Short Relation of it. In 1780, at Paris, a Number of Pamphlets of M r Galloway were sent me from England. I wrote to a Friend an Answer to them. He Sent it...
Having recieved from mr Short and others a very strong recommendation of M. Pougens a bookseller in Paris, and being desired to direct the procuring thence some books for the use of Congress, I thought to spare your time which is engaged on higher objects, & therefore desired mr Short by the inclosed letter to superintend the purchase, the details of which were to be executed by mr Duane and...
I have the honor to inclose a copy of the memorial of Jeremiah Lawrence and others, complaining of the capture by the French of three vessels belonging to them. It appears that they were engaged in Whaling on the coast of St Domingo, and that tho’ they had nothing on board but the necessary stores and the proceeds of their industry in the voyage, they were seized in a place called Sam Bay at...
On the 28 th. of this Month I rec d the Letter you did me the Honour to write me on the 13. of February, which arrived at the Hague inclosed with the Ratification of the Treaty with their High Mightinesses, which will be exchanged by M r Dumas, as the Conferences here for the definitive Treaty will not admit of my taking So long a Journey, at this Time. This Arrival in Season to exchange the...
The case of Mr William Lewis, whose vessel was carried into Tobago by a French Cruizer, as stated and referred to in the letter I had the honor to write to you on the 27th Octr 1803, has been since renewed to Genl Armstrong, who returns for answer, that he has neither seen nor heard any thing of it, that none of your papers have been left with him, and that Mr. Skipwith’s memory does not...
I have duly recd yours of the 8th. and will pay to it the attention you wish. We expect an opportunity for Genl. Armstrong about the 10th. Feby. The Vessel will sail from N. York. I mention the circumstance as this may convey the information sooner than the newspapers which are to publish it, and as you may be willing to avail yourself of the opportunity for later communications. The Embargo...
The bearer hereof is mr Robert Carter , one of the sons of Colo. Charles Carter of Shirley in this state, our first citizen in point of wealth, and head of one of the oldest & most distinguished families in it. the son having past some time in the study of medicine & surgery in Philadelphia, now goes to London, Edinburgh, & Paris to pursue the same studies. apprehensive that in the present...
Inclosed is a continuation of Mr Morris’s furlough for two Months; at the expiration of which, it may be well for him to consider that, the Regiment to wch he belongs is now very full of Men, and that the Officers of it will think it hard especially at a time when Congress are discontinuing Regimental Officers wch can scarcely be dispensed with. to perform his duty therein, while he is in the...
Your favor of the 25th Oct. afforded me much pleasure by the information it gave of the success with which you prosecuted your plan of enlightening your countrymen on the subject of sheep & wool, and of aiding them in the manner of increasing & improving both. I sincerely wish your example may be duly felt in all the states adapted to those objects, and I believe this is the case with all that...
(I) LS : National Archives; copies: Library of Congress, National Archives (two); press copy of LS and of copy: National Archives; (II) LS : National Archives; copies: Library of Congress, National Archives (two); press copy of copy: National Archives I received at the same time your several Letters of Oct. 20, 24 & Novr 26. which I purpose to answer fully by the return of the Alliance. Having...
On the third day of this Month, about ten O Clock a Solemn Deputation, in three Coaches preceeded by twelve Messengers of State, went in Procession to the House in the Wood to enter into Conference, with the Statholder concerning the past Administration of the Marine, in Consequence of a Resolution of the States of Holland and West Friesland upon the Proposition of the City of Leyden. Military...
The question of Neutral rights has not yet been taken up in our Cabinet. there is a visible leaning however to the liberal side. having had occasion in a particular case to state my own opinion privately, it will not be improper that Chancellor Livingston should see it; and the rather, as I believe my coadjutors, when we shall come to compare notes, will be found in the same sentiments. but...
Mr Stephen Girard, a respectable Merchant of Philadelphia, intending to send his Agent, Mr Robert Peter Branu, to Paris in order to solicit payment for some claims he has upon the French Government, has requested that the circumstance might be mentioned to you, with a view to bespeak your aid and countenance to him, as far as it may be requisite and compatible with usage and the nature of the...
I arrived here two days ago. Being in company with Mrs. Schuyler I was induced, in complaisance to her, to pass through New York. But I was sorry not to find any satisfactory ground to believe that the suspicions entertained of the arrival of the definitive treaty were well founded; though Rivington when it is mentioned to him shrugs up his shoulders and looks significantly; and Sir Guy has...
You were probably acquainted in this Country with Colonel Toussard who will have the honor of delivering you this letter. He has filled several stations in our Military service at different periods and always with much credit to himself and advantage to the service. During our revolutionary war he lost an arm in an action in which he displayed much zeal and bravery, and to my knowlege was...
We have talked over the Question. Who of the Commissioners are to go to the Southward? And it seems to be decided that you and myself are to be of the number and that a third must be either Mr. R. C. Livingston or Mr Ganseevort, as they may arrange it between themselves. I understand the meeting is to be sometime in September. I remain with sincere esteem   Sir   Your obed & hum ser ALS ,...
Your favor of the 10th. inst. came to hand yesterday, and I recieve it with the respect & attention with which I do every thing coming from you. nothing can be done on the subject of it till after my return to Washington which will probably be after your departure for France. whatever may be determined by the gentlemen of the administration on the subject of mr Davis, other candidates have...
Your favor of Dec. 20. has been recieved. the copy of the late volume of agricultural proceedings is not yet at hand, but will probably come safe. I had formerly recieved the preceding volumes from your kindness, as you supposed. writings on this subject are peculiarly pleasing to me, for, as they tell us, we all sprung from the earth, so to that we naturally return. it is now among my most...
ALS : New-York Historical Society; copy: Sächsisches Hauptstaatsarchiv This will be delivered to you by M. Thieriot, who goes to Philadelphia by order of his Court as Commissioner of the Commerce of Saxony, in order to establish a Correspondence between the two Countrys, that may, it is thought, be greatly advantageous to both. We have all along had many well-wishers in that Electorate, and I...
Your favor of the 12th. is just now at hand. with respect to the time of your departure it will depend on the return of mr Dawson with the ratification of the Convention. we may expect this in 4. months: so that you may have time enough to prepare for your departure soon after his arrival. we shall join with you a Secretary of legation, to guard against any accident happening to yourself: and...
I received your favor, dated the 8th of July (on the subject of the treaty with Great Britain) the day preceeding my departure for Mount Vernon; from whence I intended to have acknowledged the receipt of it: but so many letters of a public nature were poured upon me at that place, and the urgency of the business in which I have since been engaged, have prevented my doing it until now. Aiming...
The reasonable and friendly views with which you have been instructed by the President to enter into negociations with the French Government justify him in expecting from them an issue favorable to the tranquillity and to the useful relations between the two Countries. It is not forgotten however that these views, instead of being reciprocal, may find, on the part of France, a temper adverse...
I recd. from the hand of Col. Livingston your favor of Novr. 23. His return having been unexpectedly sudden, I could not conveniently then acknowledge it, and in the hope that I might be enabled by procrastination to communicate some thing or other sufficiently interesting on our public affairs, I have arrived at a very late date, and without the advantage of making any amends for it. We have...
Your favor of the 24 Ult: has lain longer by me without an acknowledgt. than I intended. One cause of the delay was an omission to address myself to the Auditor instead of the Sey. of the Treasy. and his taking some little time in the crowd of business, to prepare the inclosed note on the subject of your accts. which contains all the information I can now give. I have myself recd frequent...
Our Attorney general being absent, and none of the other members of the administration being professional lawyers, I am obliged to decide for myself in a case of law, which, in whatever way I decide, will make a great deal of noise. in this situation I ask the favor of you as a friend , and as a lawyer still in the habits of law reading, which I have not been for 30. years, to tell me what you...
Soon after my publick Reception by their High Mightinesses The Body of Merchants of the City of Schiedam, were pleased to send a very respectable Deputation from among their Members, to the Hague, to pay their Respects to Congress and to me as their Representative, with a very polite Invitation to a publick Entertainment in their City, to be made upon the occasion. As I had Several other...
Two ALS and transcript: National Archives; press copy of ALS : Myron Kaller and Associates, Asbury Park, New Jersey (1991) I have just received your Letters of Novr. 9. & Decr. 3. This is to inform you, & to request you would inform the Congress, that the Preliminaries of Peace between France, Spain, and England were yesterday signed, and a Cessation of Arms agreed to by the Ministers of those...
Inclosed are Copies of Papers, which have passed between M r. Hartley and the American Ministers. We have not thought it prudent to enter into any written Controversy with him, upon any of these Papers. We have recieved whatever he has offered us.— But he has offered nothing in the Name of his Court, has signed nothing, and upon Enquiry of him, we have found that he has never had Authority to...
LS : National Archives; press copy of LS : National Archives; copies: National Archives, Library of Congress I have just received the honour of yours dated Jan 7. Your Communication of the Sentiments of Congress with Regard to many Points that may come under Consideration in a Treaty of Peace, gives me great Pleasure, & the more as they agree so perfectly with my own Opinions and furnish me...
This is probably the last time I shall address you on this side the water. the occasion is furnished by a desire that you will be so good as to deliver the inclosed letter to my eleve and friend mr Short. I recommend him at the same time to your patronage and attentions. you will find him a man of great natural ability, compleatly read, and better acquainted with the world than most in it. he...
I am within a few minutes of setting out on a short visit to Monticello, and must therefore be very short. 20 years of intimate acquaintance with M. Dupont de Nemours has given me an unlimited confidence in him. his dispositions in favor of this country as well as France are unquestionable, and his talents so well known that I presume his opinions will have great weight with the French...