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I had Yesterday the Honour of your Letter of 25. September, and I beg leave to thank you, for your kind Congratulations on our little Success at the Hague.— I wish to have it in my Power to congratulate you Soon, upon a good Peace.— But, every Thing within my Observation, is disposing itself, both on the side of France and England for another Campaign So that I cannot give much Encouragement...
I have but this hour, received the Letter you did me the Honour to write me, on the 30th. Ult.—Enclosed in haste are a Letter to Mr. Jefferson and another, to a Friend who will be equally glad to see Mr. Jones. I am much obliged to you for giving me this opportunity of doing this little Service for your Friend and only wish it was of more importance, both for your Sake and his, being with very...
I have received your kind favour of April 22d and shall not be easy till it is answered, though it is not easy to find the time, amidst the Confusion of innumerable visits, formal Ceremonials, Balls, Commencements, Levies, &ca &ca, blended with the constant more serious Duties of my Situtation.—I agree with you entirely, that among the first dangers to be apprehended is a contest between the...
I am, this Evening favoured with yours of the 18. In Answer to your Question, I ask another. Where is the Sovereignty of the Nation lodged? Is it in the National Government, or in the State Governmen t? Are there more Sovereignties than one? if there is more than one there are Eleven. If there are Eleven there is no general Government—for there cannot be Eleven Sovereignties against one.—Are...
I am honoured with yours of the 30th. of May, and find we are well agreed in opinion in all points. Nothing Since my return to America, has alarmed me so much, as those habits of Fraud, in the use of Language which appear in conversation and in public writings. Words are employed like paper money, to cheat the widow and the fatherless and every honest Man. The word Aristocracy is one Instance....
I have duly received but not duly answered your favor of April 3d.... It is a misfortune that a man can never be spoken to by a projector without being misunderstood or misrepresented I told Mr. Forbisher that if he expected any thing from the general government, he must apply to it by petition. But I never told him, that I had the least suspicion that the general government would ever do...
The inclosed Reasons Why the Commissioners did not make Peace with the Indians, I have read with all the Interest that the Subject and the manner of treating it naturally inspire. The Facts are so natural and conformable at the Same time to all the Observations I was able to make, and all the Information I could obtain during my Residence both in France and England, that I have not a doubt of...
I was in hopes to have troubled you no more in this Way: but am disappointed. If you can oblige me, I shall transmit the Sum to you, as soon as I get to Philadelphia. I am with Usual Esteem and / Love, yours NjP : DeCoppet Collection.
I received with much Pleasure your favour of the 19th. If I should meet with any “Roses,” in my Path, I shall thank you for your congratulations, and when I set my foot on “thorns” as I certainly shall, I will thank you equally for your condolence. But when you assure me that you “feel a confidence in the safety of our political Bark,” you give me much comfort, and I pray you may not be...
Your kind Congratulations on my return to my Family and Friends are very obliging. Your polite Invitation is accepted with Pleasure. At this Period, when Disorder, Indiscipline and Disobedience of every kind fashioned into a kind of Science, are vindicated as Rights and inculcated as Duties, it is not to be expected that our Country should wholly Escape their contagious Effects. Although many...
I presume Mr. Pickering has sent you the inclosed declaration. But least it may not have come to your hand I send you a copy. This unaccountable misunderstanding, I hope will have no ill consequences. With great esteem I am Sir your / most obedient servant MHi : Adams Family Papers, Letterbooks.
I have this morning received your favour of the 3d and rejoice in the recovery of your usual health and pray that it may continue many years. When I came into office it was my determination to make as few removals as possible; Not one from personal malice; Not one from mere party Considerations. This Resolution I have invariably observed. Conviction of Infidelity to a Trust cannot be resisted...
This will be presented to you by Mr. John Churchman—he is the author of a work on the subject of the magnetic Variation—and has been complimented with the attention of the Litterati both in this Country and in Europe, where I first knew him, he is a gentleman of respectability and science—and as he visits Boston with an intention of making further observations, and to connect & compare them,...
It is his Excellency’s desire, that you have an immediate inspection made into the state of the mens arms and accoutrements, belonging to your division; and take effectual measures to have them put into the best order possible. Also to have your men completed to their proper complement of ammunition, strictly injoining the greatest care to avoid all wanton and unnecessary waste. I am Sir  ...
It appears by your letter to his Excellency that the detachment of Marylanders under Col Spotswood, have marched to your post, with the other troops. His intention and directions were, that they should remain at Princeton, as he wishes to keep the Corps united, but since the matter has fallen out differently, he desires that detachment may immediately return to Princeton. ALS , sold at...
West Point, July 30, 1779. Regrets that Lieutenant Colonel John Laurens was wounded. Discusses lack of men. Regrets not being able to send troops to the South. Sends news of Stony Point, the arrival of Charles, Earl Cornwallis, and rumors from the South. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
West Point, September 28, 1779. Congratulates Lincoln on Stono Ferry attack. Regrets delay in securing reinforcements from Virginia. Believes British objectives to be Georgia and South Carolina. Sends news of the French fleet. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
Morristown [ New Jersey ] February 27, 1780 . Is pleased with Lincoln’s present situation. Hopes that the Spanish success in Florida will turn the British attempts in that direction. Instructs Lincoln to cooperate with Juan de Miralles. Reports that Virginia troops are being sent to the South. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
Morristown [ New Jersey ] March 30, 1780 . Introduces and recommends Brigadier General Du Portail. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
Morristown [ New Jersey ] April 15, 1780 . Approves of plans for expedition against St. Augustine. Discusses situation in the South. Instructs Lincoln to “determine places of deposit” for provisions and forage in North and South Carolina. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
Morristown [ New Jersey ] April 18, 1780 . Asks Lincoln to employ Lieutenant Colonel Dubuysson “in such a manner as will enable him to indulge his ardor.” Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. Lieutenant Colonel Charles François Dubuysson des Aix des Hays .
Morristown [ New Jersey ] April 28, 1780 . Fears that loss of the “Bar” may mean loss of Charleston. Sends news of enemy’s movements and of the march of the Maryland Division. Df , in writings of George Washington and H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
As I shall have occasion to draw on the several Collectors it is necessary that you should be acquainted with my Signature which you have here below I am Sir   Your most humb Servt. L[S] , RG 36, Collector of Customs at Boston, Letters from the Treasury, 1789–1807, Vol. 4, National Archives. Lincoln was collector of customs at Boston.
⟨Here⟩ with is a circular letter, the ⟨principal object of⟩ which relates to an arrangement with the ⟨Banks⟩ of North America and New York, founded upon an immediate accommodation to the public. I am not sufficiently acquainted with the constitution and operations of your Bank to determine posstively how far the receipt of their Notes in payment of the Duties would be a measure of prudence....
It may happen that the Treasurer will draw upon you for the Compensation to the Senators and Representatives of New Hampshire as well as those of your State. The direction given to you with respect to the latter, is to extend to the former. I am Sir   Your obedient Servant L[S] , RG 36, Collector of Customs at Boston, Letters from the Treasury, 1790–1810, Vol. 2, National Archives. Samuel...
There is a species of information, which it will be convenient to you to obtain and which will be of important use to the Government: it respects the mode of Navigating of the several States; and of Foreign Nations. With a view to which I have framed a number of Queeries, to which as speedily as the requisite enquiries can be made, I request answers. Thought I do not consider it as a part of...
Treasury Department, October 19, 1789. “I have this day drawn on you … a sett of Bills of Exchange payable at Sight for Two thousand Dollars.…” L[S] , RG 36, Collector of Customs at Boston, Letters from the Treasury, 1789–1807, Vol. 4, National Archives; copy, RG 56, Letters to the Collector at Boston, National Archives; copy, RG 56, Letters to Collectors at Small Ports, “Set G,” National...
Inclosed are copies of two letters, one Circular to the several Collectors of your State, yourself excepted; the other to the Directors of the Bank of Massachusetts. You will perceive the intimation I have given respecting yourself. It is my wish to have an eye on the spot to attend to the operations of the Bank, ⟨in order that the meas⟩ure now adopted may be continued ⟨or discontinued, as...
Treasury Department, December 16, 1789. “The Register of the Treasury transmitted to you lately in pursuance of my Directions … Registers for Vessels.… You will oblige me in distributing them with as much dispatch as possible.…” LS , RG 36, Collector of Customs at Boston, Letters from the Treasury, 1790–1817, Vol. 4, National Archives; copy, RG 56, Letters to the Collector at Boston, National...
I am favored with your letter of the 16th. of last month; which I would have replied to sooner if my time had not been engrossed of late in preparing business for the consideration of the Legislature. The case of Mr. Jefferies (as stated by himself) appears a hard one; but I take the Construction of the law to include the Articles you mention; and there is no authority in any of the Executive...