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I have the Honour to inclose to Congress, the latest Gazettes. We have no other Intelligence than is contained in them. Since the 11. July the Date of Lord Howes Letter, announcing the Arrival of the Compte D’Estaing off Sandy Hook, We have not a syllable from America by Way of England. In France We have nothing from America Since 3 July. This long Interval leaves a vast Scope for Imagination...
I have the Honour to inform Congress, of my Safe Arrival in this City in the Frigate Boston after a most dangerous, and distressing Voyage of Six Weeks and four Days. The Situation of Things in Europe is so critical, at this Moment that, notwithstanding I am exhausted with the Fatigues of the Voyage, I am determined to proceed, the Day after Tomorrow, on my Journey to Paris. By all that I...
I had this Moment the Honour of yours of the 15. Ultimo and I thank you for your Kindness to Mr. Thaxter of whom I had not before heard, Since he left this Place. The Act of Congress inclosed in your Letter, I will take with me to Europe, for which Country I hope to embark in five Days in the Boston Frigate, not without Regret at having been delayed So long. I shall make out Six Copies of the...
Having been Absent, on a Journey, I had not the Honour of receiving your Letters, until Yesterday when one of the Twenty Eighth of November inclosing a Resolution of Congress of the Same Day, and another of the third of December inclosing a Commission for Dr Franklin Dr Lee and Myself to represent the United States at the Court of France, were delivered to me in Boston. As I am deeply...
M r Storer arrived Yesterday with your kind Letter of 6 March, with its Inclosure. I know not what to Say to the Subject of this Inclosure. it is a Mystery which Time will unriddle and to time I leave it, So entirely that I dont think it necessary to Say any Thing to our Colleague about it. Appearances, on the Side where you are, dont please me more than you. But I hope the Weather will soon...
I have the Honour to inclose, the latest Gazettes, which contain all the News of Europe. The News from America by the Way of London, which is contained in the Courier de L’Europe of the fifteenth instant, has raised our Expectations and encreased our Anxiety. We are not without Apprehensions that the Compte D’Estaing, may fall in with the combined Fleets of How and Biron. The English are...
I had the Pleasure of a very agreable private Letter from you, while in Paris, which I answerd, having executed your Orders, as soon as received. Whether you received my Answer I dont know. I have had a Stormy Voyage, but not more so than the Scaene you have been in, at Land. I wish I may have escaped with as much Hon­ our, as you have done: but have little Reason to believe it, for I can...
I have the Honour to inclose to Congress a few of the public Papers, which contain all the News that is passing. As it is uncertain by what Vessell the Gentleman will go who takes this, the Conveyance is too precarious, to send any Thing which ought not to be known to the Enemy. We are waiting with an impatient Anxiety, to hear from America, the last Accounts from thence having been brought by...
I have the Honour to inclose to congress, all the News Papers, I have by me. Enough to shew that We have nothing very important here, at present. The French and British Fleets are again at Sea and We hourly expect Intelligence of a Second Battle. But our Expectations from America are still more interesting and anxious, having nothing from thence, since the 3d of July, except what is contained...
I thank you, my dear sir for your kind Congratulations, on the favourable Appearances in our American Concerns, and for so politely particularising one of the most inconsiderable of them, my Safe Arrival in France, which was after a very inconvenient Passage of forty five days. Your Letter to Mr. Izzard, I had the Pleasure to send to him immediately, in Paris, where he resides, the Court of...
Last night I received yours of the third of this Month, accompanied with the Packet, put into your Hands by M r Reed, I have also received, as I Suppose the two or three Letters which went to Bath and were returned to M r stockdales, and am obliged to you for your Care of them. Upon my Arrival at the Hague, from London, one of the first Things I did, was to look for the Letters you demand. I...
I have the Honour to inclose to congress, the last Gazettes and a Plann of the various Manoeuvres in the late sea fight by which the masterly Movements of the French Fleet in every Situation, and the ridiculous Confusion of the late Lords of the ocean as they called themselves are Said to be truly represented. Whether it was Want of Skill in the officers, or whether it was a Want of Men to...
I have just received the inclosed Letter open for me to read. It appears to be from one, who had a remarkable kind of Benevolence towards the U. S. Such as has memorably appeared through the whole War, in almost all Countries, I mean the benign Inclination to be American Agents Jobbers, Officers, Ambassadors, Generals and Kings. Inclosed is a Copy of Fitzherberts Commission. Pray inclose it to...
Having had so short Notice of this Opportunity, I can only have the Honour of writing a few Lines, and of inclosing a few News Papers. If the Dispatches of the Commissioners, have not met with uncommon ill Fortune you must before this Time, have received the important News of the Treaty, as well as authentic Information of the Agonies of G.B. Whether she will plunge herself, with uniform and...
By a certain anonimous Letter you have had a Specimen of the infernal Arts which have been and are practised, to create Misunderstandings among American Ministers. There has been an uninterupted succession of them ever since I have been in Europe. Whether they are to be attributed to Inventions of Our Ennemies or to Still baser Intrigues of pretended Friends, or to impudent Schemes of...
I have the Honour to inclose to Congress, the latest News Papers: As they contain the Speech at the Opening of Parliament, and Some of the Debates in both Houses upon the Addresses in Answer to it, they are of very great Importance. I learn by Some Newspapers, and private Letters that an opinion has been prevalent in America, that the Ennemy intended to withdraw from the united States, and...
I have the Honour to inclose the latest Gazettes by which Congress will perceive, that We have no Intelligence from America, Since the Departure of the Comte D’Estaing from Sandy Hook. Our Anxiety is very great, but We hope that a few Hours will relieve it. In the Midst of a War in Germany, and between France and England, there was scarcely ever a greater Dearth of News in a Time of profound...
Last Night I received your Favour of 25. Ult. The Box I had received a few days before, and had delivered to M r Jay and the Comte de Moustier, the Articles addressed to them. The Spectacles fit my Eye very well, and I thank you Sir for your Care in procuring them. As soon as I shall have the Pleasure to See you, I will pay you the Cost of them according to the Receipt which came with them. I...
I have the Honour to inclose, to Congress one other Copy of the Speech, at the opening of Parliament, together with the Debates in Consequence of it. The Hints in those Debates, especially those given out by Lord Suffolk, are confirmed by the general Strain of Intelligence from London. Letters from Persons, who are supposed to know, announce the Determination of the Cabinet to be, That Clinton...
Your Favour of the fourth of the Month, gave me great Pleasure. But I am afraid that you and Some others of my Friends felt more for me, in the Aukward Situation, you mention, than I did for myself, ’tho I cannot Say, I was wholly insensible. I could not help laughing a little at the figure I cutt, to be sure. I could compare it, to nothing, but Shakespeares Idea of Ariel, wedged by the Waist,...
I have the Honour to inclose, the last Gazettes by which Congress will see the Dearth of News in Europe at present. We expect an Abundance of it at once soon, as We have had nothing from America Since 4. July. The French Fleet went out again from Brest the seventeenth: but We have not yet heard that the English Fleet is out. While the two Fleets were in Harbour, the British East India Fleet,...
Passy, 20 July 1778. printed : JA, Diary and Autobiography Diary and Autobiography of John Adams , ed. L. H. Butterfield and others, Cambridge, 1961; 4 vols. , 4:168–170 ; also, with “The Function of Consuls” enclosed, in Wharton, ed., Dipl. Corr. Amer. Rev. Francis Wharton, ed., The Revolutionary Diplomatic Correspondence of the United States , Washington, 1889; 6 vols. , 2:650–653. The...
We have the Honour to inclose a Copy of the Declaration concerning the 11 and 12 Articles of the Treaty of Commerce, which we have received from his Excellency the Secretary of State for foreign Affairs, in exchange for a similar one signed by us, in Pursuance of the Instructions of Congress. We have also the Honour to inclose Copies of a Correspondence with his Excellency Mr. de Sartine, the...
We have just received a Message from Monsr. Le Comte De Vergennes, by his Secretary, acquainting Us; that Information is received from England of the Intention of the Cabinet there, to offer (by additional Instructions to their Commissioners) Independence to the United States, on Condition of their making a Separate Peace, relying on their Majority in both Houses, for Approbation of the...
The last letter which We have had the Honour to write jointly to Congress, was of the Twentyeth of July, and as We have Sent Several Copies of it by different opportunities, We hope one of them at least will come Safe to hand. Since our last there has been an important Action at Sea, between two very powerfull Fleets, in which, in our Opinion the French had a manifest and great Advantage, but...
I have the Honour to inclose a Resolution of Congress of the 17 of September, enjoining upon us all, Attendance on the Negotiations for Peace, and if it were not Presumption to Suppose, that any Thing could be added to So pressing a Desire of Congress, I would beg Leave to add my most earnest Entreaties that you would be so good as to join Us as soon as possible. It would give me the highest...
Copies: Library of Congress (two), Massachusetts Historical Society, National Archives This letter from Elias Boudinot, president of Congress, not only announces the resignation of Minister for Foreign Affairs Robert R. Livingston, it also encloses a resolution of great importance to the peace commissioners. On February 5 John Adams had written to Congress that there no longer was a reason to...
Copy: National Archives As Congress have not yet elected any Minister for Foreign Affairs, and knowing the importance of your Being fully informed of every public transaction relative to these States, I have concluded that you would not think it amiss to hear from me on the subject of the removal of Congress to this place, tho’ I cannot consider this communication as official but merely for...
(I) DS : American Philosophical Society (three); D (draft): National Archives; (II) copies: American Philosophical Society, Library of Congress, Massachusetts Historical Society (three), William L. Clements Library; D (draft): National Archives In late May, 1781, the Austrian and Russian courts, invited by Britain to mediate its war with France and Spain, proposed terms to serve as a basis of...
Copies: Archives du Ministère des affaires étrangères, Library of Congress (two), National Archives (two), Massachusetts Historical Society, Charles E. Feinberg, Detroit (1957); L (draft): National Archives; LS : Philip D. Sang, River Forest, Illinois (1959), Massachusetts Historical Society You are hereby authorised and instructed to concur in behalf of these United States with his most...
Copy: Massachusetts Historical Society I was honoured with your favour of the 12th. of Decr: by the last post, enclosing a Copy of the preliminary Treaty of Peace between his Britannic Majesty and the United-States. I most heartily congratulate with you upon this great event, in which you have had the honour of so distinguished a part. I think that we ought to be, and shall be satisfied with...
ALS and two copies: Massachusetts Historical Society; copy: Library of Congress I have the honour to transmit to you herewith a packet containing one hundred passports for American Vessels which I have this moment received by a Courier from England. I take this opportunity of acquainting you that a proclamation was issued out in the King’s Name on the 14th Instant, making known the cessation...
ALS : South Carolina Historical Society; incomplete copy: Library of Congress I received your Favour of the 3d Inst. by your Son, with the News papers for which I thank you. The Disorders of that Government whose Constitution has been so much praised; are come to a height that threatens some violent Convulsion, if not a Dissolution; and its Physicians do not seem even to guess at the Cause of...
ALS : Historical Society of Pennsylvania We have been honoured with several of your Letters, and we have talk’d of writing to you, but it has been delayed. I will therefore write a few Lines in my private Capacity. Our Negociations go on slowly, every Proposition being sent to England, & Answers not returning very speedily. Capt. Barney arrived here last Wednesday, & brought Dispatches for us...
ALS : Yale University Library; press copy of ALS : Library of Congress I received your Favour by Mr Bourdieu, and yesterday another of the 18th. per Mr Hartley, who also gave me the Gazette with the Proclamation. I am with you very little uneasy about that, or any other Measures the Ministry may think proper to take with respect to the Commerce with us. We shall do very well.— They have long...
ALS : South Carolina Historical Society; press copy of ALS and transcript: Library of Congress I received your kind Letter by Mr Cholet, with the Pamphlets and Newspapers; and since a Paper of the 5th which came under Cover to Mr Grand. I am much oblig’d to you for these Communications.— Your Sentiments and mine respecting the continual Drafts on Europe coincide perfectly. I have just received...
ALS : American Philosophical Society Since mine of the 12th, I have had an Interview with Mr Grand; and on my acquainting him with your Situation, and proposing to him to furnish you with such a Sum as you might have occasion for, he most readily agreed to it, saying you had only to draw upon him, and your Bills would be honoured. I seize with Pleasure the first Opportunity to inform you of...
ALS : New York Public Library I have received your Favours of March 28. and April 7.— I am glad that Mr Hartley’s being luckily at Bath, sav’d you the Fatigue of a Journey to London. His Letter to you, of which you sent us a Copy, was very satisfactory. By one he has written to us, of the 9th Instant, we find that he expects to be here in a few Days.— I have not yet had the Pleasure of seeing...
(I) ALS , copy and two transcripts: National Archives; ALS (draft) and copy: Library of Congress; copies: Connecticut State Library, Harvard University Library, Yale University Library; transcripts: University of Pennsylvania Library, Charles E. Feinberg, Detroit, Michigan (1960); (II) ALS : South Carolina Historical Society; AL (draft): Library of Congress My Colleague, Mr. Deane, being...
LS : South Carolina Historical Society; copy: Library of Congress; transcript: National Archives I am now honour’d with yours of the 17th. I had before receiv’d one of the 17th. which remain’d unanswer’d, because from the Words in it, “when I reach the Continent, which will probably happen in a few Days,” I flatter’d myself with the Pleasure of seeing you here. That Hope is disappointed by...
LS : South Carolina Historical Society I received the Letter you did me the honour of writing to me from Lyon the 24th. past. I wonder a little at Mr. Adams not acquainting you whether your Name was in the Commission or not. I begin to suspect from various Circumstances that the British Ministry elated perhaps too much by the Success of Admiral Rodney, are not in earnest to treat immediately,...
Extract: Library of Congress —I am sorry for the numerous Disappointments you have lately met with. The World it’s true is full of Disappointments, but they are not equally divided, and you have had more than your share. The Ratifications of the definitive Treaty are now exchang’d; but Mr. Hartley waits for Instructions respecting a Treaty of Commerce, which from what you observe, may probably...
LS : South Carolina Historical Society; copy: Library of Congress; transcript: National Archives I received by Mr Oswald the Letter you did me the honour of writing to me the 7th Inst. He brought me also a Letter from Lord Shelburne, which gave him the same good Character that you do, adding, “He is fully appriz’d of my Mind, and you may give full Credit to every thing he assures you of.” Mr...
LS : South Carolina Historical Society; copies: William L. Clements Library, Library of Congress I should sooner have paid my Respects to you by Letter if I had not till lately expected you here, as I understood it to be your Intention. Your Enlargement gave me great Pleasure; and I hope that the Terms exacted by the late Ministry will now be relax’d; especially when they are informed that you...
L : South Carolina Historical Society Dr Franklin presents his Compliments to Mr Lawrens, has recd his Packet for Mr Livingston, and will forward it by the Courier, who will not leave Paris ’till Thursday, being to wait for Count de Vergennes Dispatches: so that any thing else that Mr. Lawrens may wish to send, will be time enough if it is here by Tomorrow Night. Addressed: His Excellency /...
ALS : American Philosophical Society; ALS (draft): Library of Congress The Ratification of the Definitive Treaty is arrived, and we have written to Mr Hartley that we are ready to exchange with him whenever it is convenient to him. Enclos’d you have Copies of the Recommendatory Resolution, Proclamation, & President’s Letter. We imagine Mr Hartley has an Inclination to come hither on the...
ALS : South Carolina Historical Society This Line is just to acquaint you that the Definitive Treaty between England and the United States was signed this Morning at Paris, and the others are suppos’d to be sign’d at the same time at Versailles. I shall write to you fully in a Day or two. With great & sincere Esteem, I have the honour to be Dear Sir, Your most Obedt & most humble Servt...
ALS : Princeton University Library I received your Favour of the 6th Instant, with a Copy of the Bill for the provisional Establishment of Commerce, & Mr Day’s Tract. I am much oblig’d by your kind Attention in sending them. I am glad you happen to be on the Spot to say what ought to be said respecting the pretended Loyalists. Setting them in their true Light must be of great Service. The...
ALS : Massachusetts Historical Society I had the honour of receiving yours of the 7th Instant. The Account you give of your bad State of Health alarms your Friends. Mr Oswald informs me, that the Waters of Bath used to recover you effectually. And tho’ we are very sensible that if you could get well to America, you might be of great Service to the Publick, yet we think the Hazard is too great,...
ALS : New York Public Library; press copy of ALS and copy: Library of Congress I do not doubt but you have written to some one or other of your Colleagues since your Arrival in England; and as we have heard nothing from you, I thought it necessary by a Line to inform you that none of your Letters are come to hand. After making and sending over many Propositions of ours & of Mr. Hartley’s, and...