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I recieved with great pleasure your favor of the 16. and it is with the greatest satisfaction I learn from all quarters that my inaugural Address is considered as holding out a ground for conciliation & union. I am the more pleased with this, because the opinion therein stated as to the real ground of difference among us (to wit, the measures rendered most expedient by French enormities) is...
I recieved with great satisfaction your favor of Mar. 9. which mr Pope forwarded by post, and proposed to follow it but he is not yet arrived here. I communicated to Genl. Gunn your friendly expressions respecting him. of the transaction to which they related I can say little, having, you know, neither ears to hear, eyes to see, or tongue to speak, but as the Senate direct me. I may say...
I have recd the favour of your Letter of the 27th. of last month, and feel myself much interested in the subject of it. Mr Stoddert had before shewn me your Letter to him and to your son and I had consented to the Idea Suggested in them. The Navy however is a Scene of momentous responsibility to me and if a ship should be lost by any Man for whom I shall have made myself thus exclusively...
The inclosed letters, as I conclude from others which accompanied them, have been a long time getting to hand. There was a moment, when their object seemed to present itself as one not intirely chimerical—but the probability has diminished. Tis however a thing on which the mind may still speculate as in the Chapter of extraordinary events which characterise the present wonderful epoch. My...
Several causes have concurred, to retard the acknowledgment of the receipt of your favour of the 26th of August. At the time it came to hand, I was much engaged in matters that could not be well postponed; and before I got through them, I was siezed with a fever which was unremittingly severe for several days, and left me in so debilitated a state as to render writing, and business generally...
An answer to your letter of the 5th instant has been delayed by some degree of ill health on my part. The general disposition it marks accords with the patriotic sentiments you have so consistently manifested. It is extremely regretted that any circumstance should induce you to hesitate about the acceptance of an appointment in which it is not to be doubted your services would be eminently...
Private My Dear Sir Mount Vernon 9th Augt 1798 Your letter of the 29th Ulto has filled my mind with disquietude, and perplexity in the extreme; but I will say nothing in reply, intentionally, that shall give you a moments pain. Indeed from the tenor of your letter, it would seem as if nothing I could say, now, would be of any avail—after the open, candid and I think friendly communications in...
Little did I imagine when I retired from the theatre of public life, that it was probable, or even possible, that any event would arise in my day, that could induce me to entertain, for a moment, an idea of relinquishing the tranquil walks, and refreshing shades, with which I am surrounded. But it is in vain, I perceive, to look for ease & happiness in a world of troubles. The call of my...
I received with much pleasure your favor of the 19th. If I Should meet with any “roses” in my Path, I Shall thank you for your Congratulations, and when I set my foot on “Thorns” as I Certainly shall, I shall thank you Equally for your Condolence, But when you assure me that you “feel a Confidence in the Safety of our Political Bark” you give me much Comfort, and I pray you may not be...
Amongst the last Aacts of my political life, and before I go hence into retirement, profound , will be the acknowledgment of your kind and affectionate letter from Boston—dated the 15th of January. From the friendship I have always borne you—and from the interest I have ever taken in whatever relates to your prosperity & happiness, I participated in the sorrows which I knoew you must have felt...
I wou’d not let Mr Bingham (who Says he is about to Visit you) depart without acknowledging the receipt of several letters from you; & offering Mrs Knox and yourself, my sincere condolence on your late heavy loss. Great and trying, as it must be to your sensibility, I am persuaded after the first severe pangs are over you both possess fortitude enough to View the event, as the dispensation of...
Before this will have reached you, you must have seen in the gazettes that I have taken the liberty (without a previous consultation) to nominate you the Commissioner for ascertaining the true St Croix & the Eastern boundary of the U. States, agreeably to the fifth article of the treaty lately entered into with G. Britain. I hope it will be convenient & agreeable for you to accept the trust,...
I received with great pleasure the letter you wrote me from Boston, dated the 2d instant—as I always shall do any others you may favor me with. This pleasure was encreased by hearing of the good health of Mrs Knox and the rest of your family, and the agreeableness of your establishment at St George’s in the Provence of Maine. I may add also, that the account given of the favorable disposition...
I recollect you were so kind as to undertake to give me an account of the success of an experiment made at Boston with a mill on the construction which was invented and contested by three different persons . Clarke of this state was one. A Physician of one of the Eastern states, whose name I do not recollect, was another. He had brought forward some other inventions. The third claimant was of...
Bw Dandridge respectfully informs Genl Knox that the President will be glad to see him at 10 o’Clock this morning. The President wishes the General to bring with him the message & other papers which are to accompany the treaty with the Six Nations to Congress. ADf , DLC:GW ; LB , DLC:GW . For these documents, see GW’s first letter to the U.S. Senate, 2 Jan. 1795 .
The considerations which you have often suggested to me, and are repeated in your letter of the 28th instant; as requiring your departure from your present office, are such, as to preclude the possibility of my urging your continuance in it. This being the case, I can only wish that it was otherwise. I cannot suffer you, however, to close your public service without uniting with the...
Treasury Department, December 23, 1794. “I send you a letter this moment received from the Commissioner of the Revenue, dated yesterday which contains the answer to your letter founded upon the order of the House of Representatives relative to the measures which have been adopted concerning the naval armament.” Copy, RG 233, Reports of the Secretary of War, Third Congress, National Archives....
The letter of which the enclosed is a copy, was received yesterday. The information wch it contains being of a serious nature I request that strict enquiry may be instituted into the matter and a report thereupon made to me. ADfS , DLC:GW ; LB , DLC:GW . See Pierce Butler to GW, 30 November. Knox referred the question to Alexander Hamilton, who in turn referred it to Tench Coxe. Noting that...
In reply to your letter of this date I have the honor to inform you, that no general Instructions have gone from this department to the Collectors relative to the purchase of the Lands on which Fortifications might be erected, from an expectation, that the information necessary for the Government of the Treasury would come in course through the Channel designated in your letter to me of the...
By the Presidents order Bw Dandridge respectfully transmits to the Secy of War the copy of a resolution of the House of Representative, of this date; with a request that the Secretary will prepare a Report agreeably thereto. ADf , DLC:GW ; LB , DLC:GW . On this date the U.S. House “Resolved, That the President of the United States be requested to cause a report to be laid before this House; of...
The Secretary of State begs the favor of the opinion of the Secretaries of the Treasury and of War, and of the Attorney General upon the inclosed Letter of Mr. Hammond, of the 9th. ultimo. The point on which your advice will be particularly interesting is, whether the government of the United States is bound to urge the payment requested? LC , RG 59, Domestic Letters of the Department of...
By the President’s order Bw Dandridge sends the enclosed copy of a Resolution of the House of Representatives, to the Secy of War, & requests him to give the information required thereby. The President wishes to see the Secretary in order to converse with him on the subject of the resolution. AL , DLC:GW . On this date the House of Representatives “Resolved, that the President of the United...
Various accidents have retarded the business of the treaty—among others, the death of two Oneida Chiefs—they were very old men. And the appearance of William Johnson, the British interpreter, occasioned the loss of two days. As the Chiefs told me that he had come at their request, it seemed necessary, besides mentioning my orders to suffer no British agent to intrude, to give some reasons for...
Taking into consideration all circumstances, the President has determined that there will be no occasion for him to proceed with the troops further than Bedford, & that he will return from that place to Philada. He therefore directs me to request you to countermand any orders you may have given in consequence of my letter of the 9 Inst. & to desire that the waggon with Tents &c. &c. for him...
Your letter of the 6th came to hand last night. It would have given me pleasure to have had you with me & advantages might have resulted from it on my present tour, if your return, in time, would have allowed it. It is now too late, as we shall be in the Act of crossing the mountains, or I shall be on my return to Phila. (according to circumstances & the information I shall receive) at the...
Before the Presidents departure from Philada he requested Mr Hodgdon to prepare & hold in readiness for his use sundry articles such as tents, &c. &c. which wou’d be necessary for him in case he should find it expedient to go into the western counties with the troops. These things were to be got ready by Mr Hodgdon & the President was to let him know from this place whether they should be sent...
Hodgsdon is a worthy man but between us incompetent to a great operation. It is impossible in my judgment that transportation should be so difficult to procure as he makes it. The troops are every where a head of their supplies. Before I left Town I directed some Cloathing to be forwarded. Not an iota of them has arrived or that I can find had been sent so late as the 6th & some of the Militia...
On the 23d Ulto I sent Horatio Jones the Interpreter to Buffaloe Creek to hasten the departure of the Indians and to give them any necessary assistance on the way. I thought also that he would be able to remove any little obstructions which the British Agents might continue to throw in the way. He went directly to their principal village, assembled the Chiefs and delivered my message. The...
Under the circumstances which exist to exceed your proposed time of absence so long, is to be regretted—but hearing nothing from you for a considerable time has given alarm, lest some untoward accident may have been the cause of it. Having occasion sometime ago to write to Colo. Ball on business, I observed that the land of which he was possessed was reported as a favorable spot on which to...
On the 20th I wrote you, that two runners had arrived the day before from Buffaloe Creek with a message urging me to hold the treaty there, that I had answered them that I had no authority to remove the Council fire and that the Treaty must be held at Kanandaigua. That upon receiving this answer, the runners replied that they were directed by the Chiefs to inform me that if I could not go to...