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Since my Arrival here from Carthegena I have been in constant Expectation of a secure Opportunity for forwarding the inclosed, being nearly the Copy of a Letter I wrote to my Father shortly after my landing in Spain. It contains all the Observations I have been enabled to make by Reason of the Obstacles which (in my Situation at Algiers) prevented particular Enquiry. Indeed I had not the most...
I came here a few days ago to deliver a Letter from the Emperor of Moracco to the King which I put into the Hands of the Count de Florida Blanca, acknowledging the Sense I had of his Attention & thanking him with great sincerity on the Part he had taken in our business at Moracco, He seemed very much pleased with our Success, and smiling replyed “Now that we have happily finished this Treaty...
I arrived here after an agreeable Passage of Five days and was very well received by the Governor & by the People who seem pleased to see Persons from a Country at so great a distance come to compliment their Sovereign; As the Governor had no orders concerning our going forward, I was obliged to send a Courier to Morocco to demand that Permission, and at the same time wrote to M r. Chiappi of...
The enclosed copy of a letter, which I lately received from the Count D’Espilly, contains the best information that I have in my power to afford your Excellency, with respect to the situation of our affairs at Algiers. Mr. Lamb arrived at Alicant the 24th ultimo, and undoubtedly will have advised you of his proceedings after Mr. Randall’s departure. That gentleman is now with me, and avails...
By the bearer Colonel Franks I do myself the honor to send you in a small Box the following articles. 1 st. A Book containing the original Treaty in Arabic between the Emperor of Morocco and the United States. 2. Three translations of the Treaty in English, to each of which is added a translation of a Declaration made by Tahar Fennish by order of His Majesty in addition & explanation of the 10...
I hope to have the Pleasure of soon hearing from you, and of being informed whether you have a my Commands for me farther than Morocco. I have long been anxious to see the Trade of our Country to these Parts, put on a safe and respectable footing, as I am well acquainted with the Importance of the Object, and if I can, while I am in the Neighbourhood of Africa, in the smallest Degree...
I wrote you from Morocco under date of the 16 th. —As I do not know when that Letter is likely to reach you, I trouble you now with a Copy of it, & as I shall set out in a few days for Tangiers. I defer until my arrival in Europe being particular.— I am Gentlemen, / Your most obed t. humble Serv t
I Rec d. Your Excellencys letters of the 20 th ult. I finde by them that M r. Randall had not Come to Paris when they were wrote, by M r. Randall I Stated the Exact Situation of our affaires in Algiers. and sent forw d. a Duplicate to Congress. the Demands at Algiers no Doubt will be greate. my health will by no means admitt of my undertakeing the Journey your Excellency Points out. I Dare say...
I Do my self the honor to Inclose you two Books of 82 pages Containing All my accounts respecting my missions to Morocco, by which you will see that the amount of the Expenses attending the Negotation Including the Presents and all the travelling Charges of M. Franks and my self amount to Livres 95179.10, which sum I shall place to the Debts of the United States. The Particulars of the...
I am at present waiting for a fair wind to embark for Ceuta to avoid the Quaranteen in Spain, and I embrace the Delay occasion’d by the Strong Easterly Winds that have prevail’d for Sometime, to reply to the Queries with which you honour’d me at parting.—You put them respecting the Barbary States generally but as my business has been with the Emperor of Morocco only, I shall confine myself to...
Translation of the within Letter from his Excell cy. Sidi Hadg Taher Ben Abdelhack Fennish to their Excell cies. John Adams and Thomas Jefferson Esq rs. — Grace to God who is the Sole unity Whose Kingdom is the Only Existing one To their Excellencies John Adams and Thomas Jefferson Esq rs. This is to Acquaint You that I am ordered by the Emperor my Master (whom God preserve) to Acknowledge the...
The Day before yesterday Mr Carmichael received Letters from Algiers from M r Lamb, dated the 29 th. of last Month, and from M r Randal the 26 th. (which I think a wrong Date) with a Postscript from onboard a Vessel in the Bay of Alicant of the 1 st. Inst. after a Passage of 26. [. . .]. He cannot come on shore without a Permission from Court to shorten his Quarantine, which Mr Carmichael has...
I forward the inclosed Letter from M r. Lamb for your Excellencies Information: That Gentleman has also written to me, But as I suppose he has given M r. Jefferson a more ample & satisfactory Detail of the State of his Negotiation than I can comprehend from his Letter to me, I do not think it necessary to forward a Copy of it. M r. Barclay to whom I have communicated all the Intelligence I...
As you will probably wish to know the particulars of the Negotiations of the Treaty with the Emperor, and as the perusal will not take up a great deal of time, I shall lay them before you— After the first Audience was over M r. Taher Fennish, in whose Hands the Negotiation was placed, came from the Emperor and informed me that His Majesty had read the Translation of the Letters–That he had...
I wrote to you from Cadiz the 2 nd. of last month, a Copy of which goes under the cover of this and the original, with the papers mentioned therein, will I hope be very soon deliver’d to you by Colonel Franks.—On my arrival here I had the pleasure of receiving M r. Jefferson’s letter of the 26 Sep r informing me that for the present any farther attempts to arrange matters with the Barbary...
Though in a letter written at this place–dated the 10 th. instant, I gave you a long answer to the questions with which you charged me, I will now add some farther particulars on the Subject of this Country, which you will possibly be inclined to know.— The Emperor is on the most cordial and friendly footing with Spain, the presents, made him from that Court, have been uncommonly great; and...
On the 4 th. of December last M r. Lamb delivered me the Letter which your Excellencies did me the Honor to address me dated from London the 1 st, & from Paris the 11 th. of October–At the same Time that Gentleman communicated to me his Instructions, & I all the Intelligence I had been able to procure relative to the Negociation between this Country & the Regency of Algiers. The Count...
Since I wrote you from hence the 6th. of last month I have been much aflicted with the Rheumatism in my Loins, which confind me to my bed with pains great beyond Description. I am now free of them, and Shall leave this place in a few Days. Upon further reflection, I thought it best not to abandon the Idea of meeting Mr. Lamb, and therefore I wrote to him, at Port Mahon, that I would go to...
The United States of America in Congress Assembled. To all to whom these presents shall come send Greeting. Whereas these United States from a sincere desire of putting an end to the hostilities between his most Christian Majesty and these United States on the one part, and his Britannic Majesty on the other, and of terminating the same by a peace founded on such solid and equitable principles...
After many little Disapointments, I ariv d at Algiers the 25 th March and within the term of three or four Days I found that the whole am t. of the money in my hand belonging to the publick would not purchas the people who are the unfortunates in consequence of which I dispatch d. M r. Randall so that your Excellencyes might have the earlyest notice of our matters in that Quarter: in a short...
Since my arrival here, the Ninth, nothing has occurr’d worth your Attention; I am waiting for a Vessel that is Bound to Magadore and expect to Sail in a few Days. You have probably as late Accounts from M r. Lamb as I Can give you, yet it may not be Improper to Inform you of his Arrival at Alicant the 24 th. of last Month, where doubtless his Quaranteen has delay’d his proceeding to...
The united States of America, To all to whom these Presents shall come send Greeting. Whereas his most Christian Majesty our great and beloved Friend and Ally hath informed us by his Minister Plenipotentiary whom he hath appointed to reside near us, that their Imperial Majesties the Empress of Russia and the Emperor of Germany actuated by Sentiments of Humanity and a desire to put a Stop to...
Instructions to the Honble. John Adams Benjamin Franklin John Jay Henry Laurens and Thomas Jefferson ministers plenipotentiary in behalf of the United States to negotiate a Treaty of Peace Gentlemen You are hereby authorized and instructed to concur in behalf of these United States with his most Christian Majesty in accepting the Mediation proposed by the Empress of Russia and the Emperor of...
I arrived here to Day and shall Continue My Journey to Tangiers Early in the Morning,—The Plague being at Constantina occasions a Rigorous Quaranteen of 40 Days (from Barbary) in Spain—I shall therefore Endeavor to get into Ceuta, which being in the hands of the Spaniards is an Exception to the above remark, and I think the Quaranteen from thence is only twelve [...] Days— The Treaty shall be...
This day week we arrived here, since which I have had two audiences from His Majesty, the first a public one & the second a private one of yesterday. It is but a few minutes since I heard that a Courrier will depart this Evening for Daralbeyda, & I have not time to enter into particulars. It will be agreable however for you to know, that the last draught of the Treaty is made, & will probably...
Hampshire County, 20 Apr. 1781 . Garret Van Meter, Abel Randall, James Murphy, and George Beall, Commissioners of the Tax, state that they “have employed the bearer hereof Mr. Andrew Wodrow, to go to Richmond to bring up money, to pay off the draughts for this County, likewise to carry some very important inteligence to his Excellency the Governour” and wish his expenses to be paid....
[ Williamsburg ] 12 Nov. 1779. In compliance with the requisition of 30 Oct. for the purchase of clothing for the Cherokee Indians, all the articles mentioned in Maj. Martin’s list that were to be had were secured, but for want of money the goods are being held until payment for them can be made. Before the treasury is replenished the goods may be sold. Every effort has been made to secure the...
[ Williamsburg ] 25 Jan. 1780 . Requests advice of Council concerning purchase of spirits and other commodities from De Francy for the use of the several garrisons. Reply follows: “In Council January 25th 1780. The Board disapproves altogether of the proposed purchase of Rice and Salt; and refer to the Board of Trade to determine whether the sum to which the State of the Public Treasury will...
[ Williamsburg ] 23 Dec. 1779 . The commanders of two vessels from Bermuda with salt to exchange for corn submit a proposal, enclosed. The terms agreed upon last July were bushel for bushel, but the price of corn has fallen and the price of salt doubled. It would be good policy to allow two bushels of corn for one of salt to induce others to bring salt. The captains are granted permission to...
The Act of Assembly having directed a Sale of the Ships Tartar and Dragon, the Gallies Henry, Manly, Hero, Page, Lewis and Safeguard, except such of them as may consistently with the public Interest be employed in the commercial Concerns of this Commonwealth, it is recommended to the Board of Trade to declare which of the said Vessels they are of Opinion should be retained under that...
[ Williamsburg ] 14 July 1779 . Upon consideration of the want of necessary supplies, it is proposed to offer Hunter & Co. “77 ½ for 1. for such Goods as will suit the State payable in Tobacco at the Market Price.” Signed by Whiting, Ambler, and Rose. Countersigned: “In council July 16. 1779. Disapproved of, the price being thought too exorbitant. Th: Jefferson.” RC ( CSmH ); 1 p. See Board of...
It appears from an Act of the last Session of Assembly that the Executive are empowered to make Sale of sundry State Vessells therein mentioned with this proviso that they shall have power also to retain for the State such of the said Vessels as can consistently with the Public Interest be employed in the Commercial concerns of this Commonwealth. The Commissioners of Trade beg leave to inform...
[ Williamsburg ] 3 Nov. 1779 . Submits requisitions from Board of War for shoes and for clothing for Col. Buford’s battalion at Petersburg; also a memorandum of George Purdie offering sundry articles. Mr. Greenhow has 10 dozen men’s large shoes which he offers at £12 per pair and 9 dozen small men’s shoes at £10. Prices for all the articles are exceedingly high, but the need for them is...
We tho’t it prudent, before Mr. Smith’s departure, that he should inform the Board what he expected would be allowed him for his Expences on his intended trip to Europe, that no difficulties might arise with respect to this matter on his return. He has consulted Mr. Beall on the occasion, who it seems lately made the same tour himself, and procured his Opinion, which is herewith submitted to...
The following Slaves have been purchased for the use of the State agreeable to the Instructions given this Board by His Excellency in Council Gabriel cost £6305. Ned, cost  4210 Soloman 3675 Sam  4700 Kitt (a Boy 3640. Charles  3115 Tom 3755 Sawney  3190 David 3820 James
Your Excellency’s letter of the 23d . was this day laid before the Board; there is a Vessel now at the Capitol Landing which we shall have detained till the 7th of next month, in order to take in those Articles directed to be removed to Richmond; unless it should be thought better to order her round to the College Landing to receive them: The other instructions contained in the Letter shall be...
[ Williamsburg ] 13 July 1779 . The proposals of Hunter & Co. concerning the cargo of the ship Dolphin seem exorbitant. From information respecting tobacco now owned by the state, it is impracticable to comply with the proposal. This commodity is rising daily and will probably soon reach £20 per hundred. Signed by Whiting, Ambler, and Rose. Countersigned with the following instruction: “In...
[ Williamsburg ] 8–9 Oct. 1779 . Transmitting a requisition from the Board of War for the purchase of leather breeches for Maj. Nelson’s corps of cavalry. Signed by Ambler and Rose. Below, in TJ’s hand: “In council Oct. 9. 1779. There being a sufficiency of deerskins in Richmond for the purpose of this requisition from the board of war it is disapproved. Th: Jefferson.” RC ( Vi ); 2 p.;...
Williamsburg, 21 Jan. 1780 [ misdated 1779 ]. A recent regulation enables captains of artillery in the Continental army to keep horses, which makes boots necessary equipment. A request for boots from the public shops at the reduced price seems reasonable, but, being unusual, the approval of the executive is desired. Signed by Innes and Barron. Countersigned: “In Council Jan. 24th. 1780. The...
Williamsburg, 9 Nov. 1779 . The prospects of procuring a supply of flour from Maryland are uncertain and expensive. The price in that state is already greater than in Virginia and the charge for freight immense. The extensive orders given to Col. Smith of Baltimore to purchase flour should, therefore, be immediately countermanded and a price limit set of £30 Maryland money per hundred....
Williamsburg, 14 Dec. 1779 . Since there is at present no commissary of prisoners, the vessel bearing a flag from New York should be committed to the care of Richard Barron, commanding officer of the state navy. If necessary, Capt. Barron will convey the ship to a place of safety on the western shore. Signed by Innes, Nelson, Barron, and Lyne. Countersigned: “In Council Decr. 15th. Approved...
Williamsburg, 25 Mch. 1780 . Before issuing orders for the privateersmen at King William Courthouse to be delivered to the flag from New York, the Board wish instructions concerning the British prisoners of war. Signed by Innes and Lyne. Reply follows: “In Council Mar. 25th. 1780. The Board are [of] opinion that all the prisoners of War belonging to this State (excepting only Governor...
Williamsburg, 16 Dec. 1779 . In Feb. 1779 Mark Talbot agreed with Capt. Maxwell and Col. Travis, commissioners of the navy, to build a vessel of war for the state. Talbot, supposing he had a bad bargain, did not comply with the terms of the contract. When called on in June for delivery, he stated that the enemy had destroyed the vessel, though it appears that timbers for the hull had not been...
Williamsburg, 15 Feb. 1780 . Encloses a roster of Col. Marshall’s officers, together with a recommendation of some cadets and others for commissions to complete officers for the corps of artillery, and requests that commissions be issued according to the dates specified. Signed by Innes and Lyne. Countersigned: “Feb. 17th. 1780. The Board Advise that commissions be issued accordingly. Th:...
Williamsburg, 24 Nov. 1779 . Col. Finnie, state quartermaster general, should be allowed a general order to employ workmen. Signed by Nelson, Griffin, and Barron. Countersigned: “In Council Novr. 24th. 1779. Approved for the present, but it is recommended to the Board of War to take Measures for setting apart a proper number of workmen in each Department who shall be subject to orders from the...
The Board of War recommend that a fast sailing Boat be kept as a look out at Smiths Island to give the alarm in Maggoty Bay on the approach of an Enemy; from thence an Express to be sent across the Country to Northampton Court House; the Boat then to proceed to York with the alarm. The Battery at Cheriton to be repaired, and the Guns there remounted immediately for the defence of that Inlet;...
The Quarter Master General informs us, that for want of proper Offices and Store houses, The State not only incurs a considerable expence for rents but that the public property from the impossibility of procuring proper accommodations for Storage suffers very great detriment. We take liberty to recommend that your Excellency would direct such houses on the lot purchased by the Executive of Mr....
Williamsburg, 20 Nov. 1779 . Alexander Stewart of Rockbridge co. has offered to supply the state with gunpowder. He should be engaged to supply as much as he is willing to contract for and should be paid as much as others receive for all he delivers to the magazine at Staunton. Signed by Innes, Nelson, and Lyne. Countersigned: “In Council December 1st. 1779. Approved on condition that Mr....
Williamsburg, 11 Nov. 1779 . A restatement of the full duties of the commissary of stores. Signed by Innes, Nelson, Barron, Griffin, and Lyne. Countersigned: “In Council Nov. 15th. 1779. Approved, except so far as relates to the establishment of pursers, which measure is still to be considered of. Th: Jefferson.” Tr in War Office Letter Book ( MiU-C ); 3 p.
Captain Minnis of General Mulenburgh’s family, who belongs to the 1st. Virginia Continental Regiment, being destitute of active employment, owing to the deficiency of the Virginia Line, has been called on to resume his command in his Regiment, and his company therein being extremely thin, he requests to be honored with the charge of a proportion of the recruits raised under the act concerning...