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    • Madison, James
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    • Jefferson, Thomas
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Documents filtered by: Author="Madison, James" AND Recipient="Jefferson, Thomas" AND Period="Revolutionary War" AND Period="Revolutionary War"
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RC ( LC : Madison Papers). Address on cover is no longer legible, except for “Thomas Jefferson Esqr.” Docketed by him, “Madison Jas. May 6 1783.” On the verso of the cover Jefferson deciphered the passages written in the JM-Jefferson Code No. 2, and here italicized. This code was first used by Jefferson in his letter of 14 April 1783 to JM ( Papers of Madison William T. Hutchinson, William M....
Your favor of the 21. Ult. written at Col: Pendleton’s was brought to hand by the post of last week. Col: Floyd’s family did not set out untill the day after it was received. I accompanied them as far as Brunswick, about 60 Miles from this, and returned hither on friday evening. Mr. Jones will attend the Assembly, and proposes to begin his journey this afternoon, if the present rain should...
RC ( LC : Papers of Madison). Jefferson docketed the letter by writing “Madison Jas” above the date line. Using the JM-Jefferson Code N. 2, JM encoded the words that are italicized. Your favor of the 14. inst: written on the Susquehanna with the several letters inclosed were safely delivered to me. I did not fail to present as you desired your particular compliments to Miss K Your inference on...
Your favor of the 14. inst: written in the Susquehanna with the several letters inclosed were safely delivered to me. I did not fail to present as you desired your particular compliments to Miss K. Your inference on that subject was not groundless. Before you left us I had sufficiently ascertained her sentiments. Since your departure the affair has been pursued. Most preliminary arrangements,...
MS ( LC : Jefferson Papers). Three pages of notes, undated and unsigned but in JM’s hand. Probably given to Thomas Jefferson in Philadelphia about 6 March 1783. Many years later Jefferson’s secretary, Nicholas P. Trist, attached to the memorandum a page bearing the comment, “This is, I believe, in the handwriting of Mr. Madison, N.P.T .” Ca. 6 March 1783 . The contents of this memorandum,...
Plan proposed consists of 1st. permanent revenue. 2. abatements in favor of the States distressed by the war. 3. common mass of all reasonable expences incurred by the States without sanction of Congress. 4. territorial cessions. Manner in which the interests of the several States will be affected by these objects: N. Hamshire will approve the establishment of permanent revenue, as tending to...
RC ( LC : Madison Papers). Addressed to “The honble T. Jefferson.” Unless otherwise noted, the words italicized are those that were written by JM in the cipher described in Jefferson to JM, 31 Jan. 1783 , ed. n. After recovering the present letter from Jefferson, JM wrote “Madison Jas.” above the date line. In his old age he or someone at his direction placed a bracket at the close of both the...
Your two favors of the 14th. one of them inclosing a letter to Miss Floyd were received by yesterday’s mail. The last paper from N.Y. as the inclosed will shew you has brought us another token of the approach of peace. It is somewhat mysterious nevertheless that the preliminaries with America should be represented by Secy. Townsend as actually signed and those with France as to be signed , as...
RC ( LC : Madison Papers). Docketed by Jefferson, “Madison Jas.” The Committee, to whom was referred your letter to Secretary Livingston, reported to Congress yesterday that they had conferred with Mr. Morris who was of opinion that no vessel would sail from american ports after the arrival of the British King’s speech until the suspence produced by it should be removed, and that if your...
The Committee, to whom was referred your letter to Secretary Livingston, reported to Congress yesterday that they had conferred with Mr. Morris who was of opinion that no vessel would sail from American ports after the arrival of the British King’s speech until the suspence produced by it should be removed, and that if your immediate embarkation were still wished by Congress it would be proper...