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    • Munroe, Thomas
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    • Jefferson, Thomas

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I have perused and considered the inclosed representation of James M. Lingan, the original proprietor of the Ground within an open space in front of Square No. 78 in the City of Washington bounded by Pennsylvania Avenue, 20th. Street west and I. Street north, as also the enclosed three Letters from a Committee of the Citizens and House holders in that part of the City which lies west of the...
T Munroe’s best respects & sends for the Presidents signature a blank requisition, together with a rough Sketch of outstanding claims against the public buildings—Some of those to whom the $2374 are due are, doubtless much more needy than the others, but It will probably not be an easy matter to avoid murmuring if a discrimination be made— Claims against the public buildings John Haydock $240....
The Post of last night brought a Letter from you to Mr. Latrobe, which I will forward to him immediately I can ascertain where it will probably find him—. He came to the City on the evening of the 9th. Instant, and, I am informed, went off in the Stage yesterday morning—I saw him once only, and then had but a few minutes conversation with him—I do not know when he is to be here again, or what...
Having just heard that you will probably leave the City tomorrow morning, I have supposed it might not be improper to enclose a blank warrant for your signature in case you, Sir, should deem it necessary to place a further sum of money in my hands, or to lodge it in the Treasury, or elsewhere to be Drawn when the sum now in hand shall have been expended.—Some inconvenience might arise from the...
T Munroe presents his best respects to the President. He encloses Messr. Lenthall & Blagdins report concerning the wooden House building on F street; and, as the District Attorney is not in the City respectfully asks whether it would be advisable to bring the present case before one of the Judges of the Court to ascertain whether an injunction will be granted, and also whether the Court on...
T. Munroe presents his best respects to the President. The demands against the public buildings requiring a further sum of money T. M. has the honor of inclosing a blank Draft for the Presidents signature, in case it should be his pleasure to sign it—T. M will send to the President (if desired) An Acct of the Disbursement of the $8,000 Drawn 1t. Feby. DLC : Papers of Thomas Jefferson.
T Munroe’s best respects to the President. The Demands against the public buildings, including 3000$ to G Blagdin & the rolls of the other workmen & Labourers, amt to nearly 8,000$. TM therefore respectfully asks the Presidents signature to the enclosed requisition. DLC : Papers of Thomas Jefferson.
T. Munroe, with his best respects to the President, Encloses Statements of the interest & last Instalmt of the Loans from the State of maryland to the City, which TM recd from the Treasurer of that state a few days since— DLC : Papers of Thomas Jefferson.
Expenditures on the Capitol 1803 April For Lime 596. 17 " Sand 100. 80 " Laborers & carters 75. 30 " Surveyor’s Salary on accot. 141. 66       
I have the honor of enclosing for your Signature a warrant for $10,000; the balance in my hands, towit about $1000 of the $20,000 heretofore drawn being insufficient to meet the Expenses of the present month which will be demanded in a few days.— I also enclose Sketches of the Expenditures since the Account last rendered , which was up to the first of July.— The Expenses on the Streets will I...
T Munroe presents his best respects, and has the Honor of enclosing for the Presidents signature a Draft on the Treasury for a further sum of Ten thousand Dollars.— It has occurr’d to TM that it might, perhaps, be satisfactory to the President if applications to him from time to time for Drafts on the Treasury were accompanied by Accounts of the disbursement of the Amt. previously drawn—If...
The length of the new Road in the Presidents Square is, 1130 feet, or 68½ perches nearly. The Cost of the above road per rolls returned by Overseer is $359.72. T Munroe respectfully informs the President that there is another framed house building near Mr Pichons which evades or an attempt is made to evade the proclamation by bringing down a hipp’d roof within twelve feet of the cill— The...
I have in hand between three & four thousand Dollars of the ten thousand recd. 3d. Instant; but as the Expenditures at the Capitol during the present & two next months will be much greater than heretofore    it may. perhaps prevent inconvenience if it should be the Presidents pleasure to leave with the Secretary of the Treasury, or some other person here a warrant for such sum as may be...
The enclosed representation having been this day delivered to me to be laid before you, it may not be improper for the following observations to accompany it. A man by the name of Jenkins , tenant of Samuel Davidson an Original proprietor claims the right of retaining possession of the part of the City mentioned in the representation, under that part of the Deed of Trust, of which the enclosed...
T. Munroe presents his best respects to the President. Mr Latrobe has drawn on TM at sight for between 2 & 3000$ for sheet iron—The Bill has been presented through the Medium of the Bank of the US—and if not paid will be returned protested, the Cashier says—. TM has not public money in his hands sufficient to pay this Bill, and wishes the practice of Drawing Bills at sight and negotiating them...
T Munroe tenders his most respectful salutations to the President, and hopes he has returned to the City in good health. The workmen, and some other persons who have claims against the public buildings, being very desirous of getting their money, TM has promised to try to pay them on monday morning; He therefore hopes to be excused for troubling the President, so soon after his return, for his...
The writer of the enclosed Letter delivered it to me in person, and requested it might be laid before you; and as the style is not indecent or disrespectful I do not percieve any sufficient objection to complying with the request and therefore do myself the honor of enclosing it—. I Have the Honor to be with the utmost respect Sir Yr mo Ob Hum Servt. DLC : Papers of Thomas Jefferson.
Indisposition has prevented an earlier attention to the claim of Mr. Ab: Ritchie as administrator acting under the Will of the late Chas. Beatty, to a portion of land said to take in a part of the Presidents house. The letter of Mr Ritchie being the first direct notification of such a claim which has come to my knowledge, I submit to the Executive such information as I possess on the subject....
T Munroe with his most respectful Compliments sends to the President a Letter from the Treasurer of Maryland concerning which he respectfully solicits the Presidents directions The Amt. of Interest due 1t. Instant will be forwarded by the next mail (friday) at which time T.M. will answer the Treasurers Letter if it should be convenient for the President to honor him with his sentiments in the...
T Munroe respectfully begs to know whether it is the pleasure of the President to renew the proclamation concerning wooden buildings in the usual form; or whether, as he sometime since intimated he will vary the regulations, or leave them as originally established, which interdicts the erection of wooden houses of all sizes. The Surveyer has designated the Streets which are obstructed by the...
I recd., on the 10th Instant, the Letter which you did me the honor to write from Colo Wrens on the 7th—We are proceeding with diligence in our operations on Pennsylvania Avenue according to your directions. It seems to be a very general opinion here that without the trees are boxed, or otherwise protected from the horses and cattle a great many, if not all of them will be bark’d and...
I recollect that you desired me some time ago to give you some information concerning part of the Ground on which your Coachmans house stands & as well as I remember I gave you a sketch of it, but have not since been informed of your wishes on the subject— The Coachman having today applied to me to buy the ground, and not knowing whether it was with your knowledge & consent I have supposed it...
In the year 1794, the then Commissioners of this City convey’d to James Greenleaf One thousand Standard Lots on the personal responsibility of himself Robert Morris and John Nicholson, whose Bond was taken for the purchase money, amounting to Eighty thousand dollars.   This money not having been paid, a Bill was filed in the Chancery Court of the State of Maryland, before the Jurisdiction of...
T. Munroe’s most respectful Compliments, and asks whether it is the pleasure of the President to renew the enclosed proclamation or whether he will direct any alterations in the provisions or duration of future proclamations as to wooden houses.— DLC : Papers of Thomas Jefferson.
I thank you very sincerely, Sir, for the kind expressions contained in your Letter of 1 t instant, rec d today.—The favorable terms you were pleased to use towards me, in a Letter you did me the honor to address to me in 1815, approving the humble Official Agency, I had exercised under you, and by your apporintment, together with the urbane and polite treatment I had always received from you,...
It may not be amiss to apprize you, Sir, that of the monies appropriated for the public buildings 27,000$ remains unexpended—and that agreeably to the letter of the Acts of Congress making the appropriations only 7 or 8 hundred Dollars of that sum is applicable to the Presidents House & North wing of the Capitol; it appearing that of the 20,000$ appropriated on the 25th January 1805 for this...
T. Munroe tenders his best respects to the President, He has received an Estimate of the probable Amt of monies which may be wanted during the present month—Mr. L mentions $3000 for the So wing, but TM has upwards of that sum remaining in his hands of the Amt heretofore drawn in part of that fund [ Note in TJ’s hand :] Apr. 4. signed warrants. North wing 1000.D
Out of the $30,000 Drawn on your warrants of 2d & 5th Instant, on acct of the Deficit in previous Appropriations, provided for by the Act of last session of Congress I have paid the following claims vizt Brought up— $ 14033. 11 Thomas Rayner 242.
T Munroe presents his best respects to the President. He has the honor to send enclosed a rough Sketch of the Account to be laid before Congress. If approved by the President in its present form TM will make a fair Copy of it tomorrow—. In case the President wishes any alterations, and he should not find it convenient to direct them in writing, TM will wait on him to receive his verbal...
I have been in an infirm state of health for some time past, and part of the last week, was unable to attend to business—My indisposition is said to be occasioned by a slight affection of the liver, for which I am advised to go to the Ball-Town springs in the State of New York—. I shall make such arrangements in my business as will prevent any inconvenience resulting from my absence, and with...
Mr. Soderstom assignee of Mr L’Enfant wishing to take Lots for his claim, or considerable part there of, has written, to T Munroe on the subject desiring a Statement of the Amt. T Munroe respectfully begs the President to have the goodness to look at the enclosed papers, and to say whether it is perfectly clear that Interest ought to be allowed—The late board of Coms. it is true say they will...
Statement of the Expenditure of the $15,000 appropriated 3d March 1807 for repairs & improvements on the Presidents house & Lot. estimated to be due Amt. paid Amt. of Accounts settled & properly charged to that fund $6,800.90 Cost of wall and Gates built, & materials remaining to be used
I find on a diligent and particular enquiry of the Overseer & others who saw the riotous workmen parading the streets, and heard a good deal of what was said amongst them that Matthias Th yne (or Kyan) Charles Dent, Mark Fahey, Thomas Bean, John King Thomas Crowley, then in the public works, and Brian Sarner & one or two others, whose names are not known, and who were not employed by the...
The Sale of Lots which commenced on Monday the 30th. ulto. was continued from day to day during that week, and was adjourned on Saturday the 4th. Instant ’till monday the 13th Instant, and has since been continued daily.—About 100 Lots were sold the first week, & four only have been sold this week—the whole Amount of sales is about $9,500.—After the third or fourth day of sale competition...
T Munroe presents his best respects to the President— Immediately after receiving the Presidents note yesterday T.M. examined the wooden building at the corner of 15th & G streets, near the Treasury, and found on enquiry that it had lately been removed from the back part to the front of the lot on which it stands—that it was built many years ago, and that the only alteration making is the...
T Munroe presents his most respectful Compliments to the President—several very worthy mechanics & others, who have small claims against the public building & having represented to T M that they were, at this inclement season, in want of necessary for their families which the money due to them from the public would inable them to procure, he, about a week ago, (presuming that no part of the...
T Munroe respectfully enquires of the President whether the sheet iron charged in the enclosed bills, or either of them, was ordered by him for his private use—. The bills have been presented to me for payment, but there has been no such parcel of iron ordered for public use I am informed DLC : Papers of Thomas Jefferson.
The proper Officer has rendered, in behalf of the State of Maryland, the enclosed Account of a quarters Interest due the 1st. Octo. last on the two Loans of $100,000 each by the said State for the use of the City of Washington—I have no monies in my hands wherewith I can pay the same, nor do I believe a sum sufficient for the purpose can at present be raised by a sale of the Lots in the City...
T Munroe presents his best respects to the President—He did not until Saturday meet with a suitable person to top the trees—A beginning was made on that day (Holt the Gardner having previously given it as his Opinion that it might, at almost any time of the year, be done with Safety). Some persons, however, yesterday mentioned that the sap was too much up, and that many of the trees would be...
T Munroe contrary to his expectations finds that the $20,000 Drawn 28 ulto. will probably be out on Saturday, in consequence of some large payments which he did not expect would have been called for so soon—He therefore respectfully submits to the President whether it may not be as well to give a warrant for a further sum before his departure, say for $10000. DLC : Papers of Thomas Jefferson.
T. Munroes best respects to the President He had supposed, until an examination proved it to be otherwise, that the Proclamation concerning wooden buildings had been renewed for the year 1807; but upon reflection he thinks that the President expressed some idea of leaving the regulations as originally established, in consequence of the troublesome attempts to evade them, as altered by the...
Matthias Ryan } The Overseers say the 17 persons here mentioned are all those employed at the Presidents House, who behaved improperly on the 2d. July (yesterday) by riotously parading about the streets; the three first named were the leaders it is said, and the seven following were next in fault—the rest joined in the mob & walked about the City—but Matthias Ryan was the principal exciter,...
I beg leave respectfully to submit for your consideration a sketch of our funds and a few remarks relative to the public works now progressing in the City, which I am apprehensive we shall be obliged to discontinue in part or the funds will be exhausted long before the end of the building Season.— There is now in the Treasury of the $50,000 appropriated } Dollars. last session, including the...
T. Munroe presents his best respects to the President & has the honor of sending a Memdm. of the lengths and cost of the new road north & east of the Treasury—. T.M. thinking it had cost nearly a third more than it ought to have cost had some conversation with the Overseer on the subject—he said he had laboured under several disadvantages, and mentioned, the digging up the gravel from the old...
Mr King the late Surveyor of the City, and his Son Robert having this morning informed me that they shall on Sunday next sail for England in a vessel lying at Alexandria—and that several persons have applied to them within the last day or two to lay off lots & give levels, and other necessary information relative to buildings, which it will not be in their power to do before their...
T Munroe presents his best respects & sends enclosed, to the President the sketch, as directed, of Expenditures on Prests. House & No wing of the Capitol—It can easily be made more in detail if desired, but TM thinks that in the paper left with the President on his return from Monticello the individual payments and the purposes for which they were made are stated.— Since TM had the honor of...
Expenditures from 1 to 16 Sep 1803 on Capitol  for Lumber 117.10  B H Latrobes Salary 283.33  workmen &. Labrs. 760.35  Stone (foundation) 200.  Cordage 14.02  sundry small articles 10.37 1385.17 on Streets  for Labourers & Carters wages 938.41  Lumber for Bridges 61.79
T. Munroe’s most respectful Compliments—he waited on the President with the enclosed lists, but finding him engaged has the honor of observing that the Expenditures on the High ways, the lists amount to $4,787.32 which is not included in the $11,928.29 chd. to Prests. House. nothing about the ways was inserted by T.M in the blanks left by Mr Latrobe in his report concerning the buildings,...
 Appropriated for South wing Capitol— $11,500.  th Expended, Charged 26 May $1,237. 58 Do 17 June 1793. 87 Do. 30 135. 44 Do. 12 July 583. 61
T Munroe presents his respects and begs leave to ask whether the President has any objection to the removal of the stile, at the west side of the fence, from its present situation to one a little to the south so as to avoid the danger of falling into the holes which the Brick makers dug before it was observed by T.M In wet weather the walking is so bad between the Prests Ho. and War Office...