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Mr. Burke’s Bill not being as yet public, we are not yet informed of the Extent of it. But as it already appears, that it strikes at the Department of Secretary of State for America, at the Board of Trade, there seems to be little Reason to doubt that it goes further and strikes at the American Board of Commissioners, at all the American Judges of Admiralty, Governors of Provinces, Secretaries...
Paris, 1 June 1780. RC ( PCC , No. 84, II, f. 90–95). printed : Wharton, ed., Dipl. Corr. Amer. Rev. Francis Wharton, ed., The Revolutionary Diplomatic Correspondence of the United States , Washington, 1889; 6 vols. , 3:752–758. This letter, read in Congress on 5 Sept., contains John Adams’ analysis of Lord George Germain’s speech of 5 May opposing Gen. Conway’s bill to end the American war,...
War is to a Dutchman the greatest of Evils. Sir Joseph Yorke is so sensible of this, that he keeps alive a continual Fear of it by Memorials after Memorials, each more affronting to any Sovereignty of delicate Notions of Dignity, than the former. By this means he keeps up the Panick and while this Panick continues, I shall certainly have no Success at all. No Man dares engage for me—very few...
On the fourth of May I did myself the Honour to wait on Peter Van Bleiswick Esqr., Grand Pensionary of Holland, and presented him a Letter containing a Copy of my Memorial to the States General &c. His Excellency said that it was necessary for me to go to the President and Secretary of their High Mightinesses, and that it was not customary for foreign Ministers to communicate any thing to the...
Paris, 24 April 1780. RC in John Thaxter’s hand ( PCC , No. 84, I, f. 495–498). printed: Wharton, ed., Dipl. Corr. Amer. Rev. Francis Wharton, ed., The Revolutionary Diplomatic Correspondence of the United States , Washington, 1889; 6 vols. , 3:626–628. In this letter, received by Congress on 19 Feb. 1781, John Adams sent intelligence derived from newspaper reports originating at Stockholm,...
Amsterdam, 11 Oct. 1780. Dupl in John Thaxter’s hand ( PCC , No. 84, II, f. 289–304). printed : Wharton, ed., Dipl. Corr. Amer. Rev. Francis Wharton, ed., The Revolutionary Diplomatic Correspondence of the United States , Washington, 1889; 6 vols. , 4:88–95. The copy cited here was received by Congress on 29 Jan. 1781, but the original (not found) was received and read on 27 Dec. ( JCC...
Paris, 25 April 1780. RC ( PCC , No. 84, I, f. 500–503). In this letter, received by Congress on 19 Feb. 1781, John Adams included long newspaper accounts from Dublin of events in Ireland, particularly the progress of the volunteer movement, and from London of the efforts of the British ministry to bring about a resolution of the Irish problem. RC ( PCC , No. 84, I, f. 500–503.)
Paris, 10 April 1780. RC in John Thaxter’s hand ( PCC , No. 84, I, f. 443–446). printed : Wharton, ed., Dipl. Corr. Amer. Rev. Francis Wharton, ed., The Revolutionary Diplomatic Correspondence of the United States , Washington, 1889; 6 vols. , 3:604– 606. Received by Congress on 19 Feb. 1781, this letter included a series of newspaper accounts of events at Copenhagen, Madrid, Paris, Malta,...
La Coruña, Spain, 16 December 1779. RC in John Thaxter’s hand PCC , No. 84, I, f. 231.; docketed: “No. 2 Letter from J. Adams Corunna Decr. 16. 1779 Read March 27. 1780.” LbC Adams Papers . LbC in Thaxter’s hand Adams Papers ; notations: “Recd in Congress Oct. 15. Triplicate.”; by Thaxter: “No. 2.” and “NB. Nos. 1 & 2 were sent by Captain Trask bound to Newbury Port from Corunna.” For a...
The Prince was ill advised, when he undertook, what he was not obliged to do, in producing Mr. Laurens’s Papers, which he did too in a manner justly offensive to the United States. It was the part of Sir Joseph Yorke, to have produced them, not to the Prince, but to their High Mightinesses. His Serene Highness, therefore, in this Work of Supererogation, gave himself the Air of an Instrument of...