Search help
Documents filtered by: Recipient="Hancock, John"
Results 1-50 of 432 sorted by relevance
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
M r De Hogendorp a Lieutenant in the Dutch Guards, in the Service of the Republick of Holland, is going to America in the Suite of M r Vanberckel the Dutch Minister and I am requested by Some respectable Gentlemen to give him Letters of Introduction to Some Persons in America. any Civilities you may please to Shew him, will be gratefully acknowledged, by / Sir your most obedient and / most...
This letter will be delivered you by M r: S. —a Gen t: who has lived sometime in my family at the Hague, in Paris & in London. He will inform you in what manner the late Navigation-Act of the Mass a: has been rec d. here— Some say it is a measure taken in a passion, & not well-weighed in the scales of reason—that we are ruining ourselves—that an act of Parliament will be passed to retaliate...
M r. Hartley, his Britannic Majesty’s Minister Plenipotentiary for negociating the definitive Treaty, has requested of me in the Name of the Prince Carominico, the Neapolitan Ambassador at the Court of S t. James’s, Letters of Introduction for his Cousin Il Comte di Vermé, who is going to visit America. He will be happy in an Opportunity to see so illustrious an American as the Governor of...
I beg leave to introduce to your Excellency, M r. Anstey a Barrister at Law, and member of Parliament, who seems to be an amiable man, and it is to be hoped his Tour to America may have some good effects. By the papers this morning it seems a motion was yesterday made in the house of Commons for an account of the Number of Vessels cleared out from any of the ports in Great Britain, with...
Near Pennypackers Mill [ Pennsylvania ] October 5, 1777. Describes the “unfortunate” attack on Germantown. Df , in writings of Robert Hanson Harrison and H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
The President of the United States presents his best respects to the Governor, and has the honor to inform him that he shall be at home ’till 2 o’clock. The President of the United States need not express the pleasure it will give him to see the Governor—but, at the same time, he most earnestly begs that the Governor will not hazard his health on the occasion. Copy, DLC:GW . For background to...
Near Pennypackers Mill [ Pennsylvania ] October 7, 1777 . Reports American losses at Germantown and estimates British losses. Intends to rest the men and wait for reinforcements. Reports on naval forces on the Delaware. Asks for more general officers. Recommends Brigadier General Alexander McDougall for promotion. Urges speedy completion of inquiry into Major General Arthur St. Clair. Reports...
[ Philadelphia June 10, 1792. “The period of the session did not permit the subject being brought before Congress, with advantage, previous to their rising. Your excellency however may rely that it shall receive the attention which is due to so benevolent a purpose and to the auspices under which it presents itself.” Letter not found. ] ALS , sold by Dodd, Mead and Company, New York City,...
Morristown [ New Jersey ] April 12, 1777. Introduces Mauduit du Plessis and recommends his appointment as a captain of artillery. LS , in writing of H, Papers of the Continental Congress, National Archives. John Hancock was President of the Continental Congress. Thomas Antoine, Chevalier de Mauduit du Plessis, was appointed a captain in the Continental artillery on April 15, 1777.
Your Excellency will oblige me by having the inclosed delivered to Major General Howe should he be in Boston, or forwarding it to him should he be in the neighbourhood or in New Hampshire—The letter is of consequence, and I therefore hope you will excuse the liberty I have taken in addressing it to your particular care. I have the honor to be with very sincere Regard Yr Excellency’s Most obt...
Morristown [ New Jersey ] April 23, 1777. Requests apprehension of a spy. LS , in writing of H, Papers of the Continental Congress, National Archives.
Camp near Germantown [ Pennsylvania ] August 10, 1777. Reports that Army has been moved to Coryells Ferry. Discusses desirability of defending Fort Island rather than Billingsport. Asks permission to have Major General Tronson du Coudray survey region between Marcus Hook and Philadelphia. LS , in writing of H, Papers of the Continental Congress, National Archives.
Morristown [ New Jersey ] April 26, 1777. Gives instructions concerning pay of American prisoners. Discusses conduct and influence of Tories. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
Camp at Cross Roads [ Pennsylvania ] August 17, 1777. Seeks information concerning Du Portail’s request to Congress for horses and servants at public expense. LS , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. Colonel Louis Le Bèque (Le Begue) Du Portail was sent to America in July, 1777. Congress appointed him chief engineer with the rank of colonel. He was given the rank of...
Camp at Cross Roads [ Pennsylvania ] August 22, 1777. Acknowledges receipt of news that enemy is in Chesapeake Bay. Informs Hancock of orders given to Colonel Thomas Proctor, Brigadier General Francis Nash, Major General John Sullivan, and the Army at Headquarters. Approves of removal of stores from Lancaster and York.
Major General Howe having an inclination—during our present moments of tranquility & the inactivity of the Season—to visit Rhode Island and Boston, I take the liberty of introducing him to your Excellency’s acquaintance as he may not have the pleasure of being personally known to you. incomplete CSmH .
Wilmington [ Delaware ] August 28, 1777. Recommends Count Casimir Pulaski to command cavalry. LS , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. Pulaski was a Polish officer recommended to Washington by Benjamin Franklin and Arthur Deane Arthur Lee . He later commanded an independent corps of cavalry known as Pulaski’s Legion.
Letter not found: to John Hancock, 12 Mar. 1777. Hancock’s letter to GW of 25 Feb. is docketed in part “Ansd 12 March.”
Ramapo [ New Jersey ] July 25, 1777. Introduces Monsieur D’Avout. LS , in writing of H, Papers of Continental Congress, National Archives.
Wilmington [ Delaware ] August 29, 1777. Discusses movements of enemy. Asks Hancock to send commissions for Brigadier Generals John Glover, Enoch Poor, and John Paterson. LS , in writing of H, Papers of the Continental Congress, National Archives.
Yellow Springs [ Pennsylvania ] September 17, 1777. Discusses situation of enemy and American efforts to secure reinforcements. LS , in the writing of H, Papers of the Continental Congress, National Archives.
Near Germantown [ Pennsylvania ] September 14, 1777. Is directing Major General Israel Putnam to send a second detachment of one thousand men to camp. LS , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
Middlebrook Camp [ New Jersey ] June 2, 1777. Encloses news from Northern Department. Deplores deficiency of troops. States that Colonel Elias Boudinot is going to Philadelphia to discuss exchange of prisoners. Df , in writing of H; last line and postscript in writing of Robert Hanson Harrison, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. Boudinot was commissary general for prisoners,...
Camp at Cross Roads [ Pennsylvania ] August 12, 1777. Has instructed Brigadier General Silas Newcomb to maintain New Jersey militia at Woodbury. Asks if Major General Tronson du Coudray may call on Newcomb for aid. LS , in writing of H, Papers of the Continental Congress, National Archives. Also known as Neshaminy Camp. This later became Hartsville, Pennsylvania.
[ Whitpain Township, Pennsylvania ] October 22, 1777 . Regrets that Hancock is forced to retire as President of Continental Congress because of poor health and the pressure of private affairs. LS , in writing of H, George Washington Photostats, Library of Congress.
Camp at Cross Roads [ Pennsylvania ] August 15, 1777. Suggests plan of defence for Fort Island based on Major General Tronson du Coudray’s maps. LS , in writing of H, Papers of the Continental Congress, National Archives.
Letter not found: to John Hancock or Any Member of the Continental Congress, 22 Sept. 1777. Elbridge Gerry in his letter to GW of 24 Sept. referred to “your Letter of the 22d directed to the President or any Member of Congress.”
I am honoured with yours of the 4th inclosing sundry Resolves of Congress from the 29th March to the 5th instant. I am extremely glad to see the Resolve for the immediate removal of Military Stores from Baltimore and Annapolis, for altho’ I do not imagine that the Enemy intend an expedition of any great Consequence in Chesapeak Bay, yet while the Stores lay at the above places, they were...
I do myself the honour to transmit you the inclosed most interesting and agreeable intelligence which I have this moment recd from Genl Putnam. I can scarce doubt but Genl Gates has sent you an Express, but lest he, from the important Business in which he was engaged, should not have done it, I have immediately forwarded it, that you might not be debarred from so great a pleasure an instant...
I have this moment received your Excellen[c]y’s polite letter of today—and have the honor to inform you that in consequence of suggestions made by the Gentlemen from Boston and the Depy Adjut. Genl (whom I met at Worcester this morning) that it would make it more convenient for the troops, many of which lived at a distance from the place of parade, if I should pass through Cambridge at an...
Since I had the Honor of addressing you Yesterday, Nothing of Importance has occurred and the Enemy remain, as they then were. I was reconnoitring the Country and different Roads all Yesterday, and am now setting out on the same business again. Sensible of the advantages of Light Troops, I have formed a Corps under the command of a Brigadier, by drafting a Hundred from each Brigade, which is...
I herewith transmit you Copies of a Letter from Genl Schuyler and Its several Inclosures which I received since I had the honor of addressing you yesterday. From these you will learn, that Genl Thomas died the 2d Instant, and the apprehensions of our Frontier friends in this Colony that our Savage foes are meditating an attack against them. I must beg leave to refer you to a paragraph in the...
It gives me real pain to learn, that the declining state of your health, owing to your unwearied application to public business, and the situation of your private affairs oblige you to relinquish a station; though but for a time, which you have so long filled with acknowledged propriety. Motives as well of a personal as of a general concern make me to regret the necessity that forces you to...
Inclosed I have the Honor to transmit you a Copy of my Letter to Lord Howe as well on the Subject of a Genl Exchange of prisoners in the Naval Line, as that of Lieutt Josiah in particular, and of his Lordships Answer, which for Its matter and manner, is very different from Genl Carletons Orders which were forwarded Yesterday. The Situation of the Armies being the same, as when I had the...
I do myself the Honour of addressing you in Consequence of an Application from the Commissary General, who is by my Direction taking all proper Precautions on the Approach of Winter. I desired him to commit to writing such Proposals as his Experience & Knowledge of the Country might intitle him to make, which he has done in the Paper which I have the Honour to inclose. The Difficulty of...
Your Favor of this date with its inclosures is now before me. At the same time that I express my thanks for the high mark of confidence which Congress have been pleased to repose in me by their Resolve authorizing me to send an Officer to command the northern Army, I should wish to be excused from making the appointment. For this, many Reasons might be mentioned, and which, I am persuaded will...
I have perused the petition preferred by the Independant Corps of Boston and beg leave thro you to Inform Congress, that the Five Regiments there are extremely deficient in Arms, as are many Other Regiments in Continenta⟨l⟩ pay, and Submit It to their consideration whethe⟨r⟩ any part of the Arms lately taken, under these circumstances shou’d be delivered to the Gentlemen applying for them,...
I am this Moment Honor’d with yours of 5 OClock this morning, & have accordingly sett the Army in Motion One Division had Cross’d the Deleware the day before Yesterday, & I am in hopes the whole of the Troops now here will be able to reach Philada tomorrow Evening Lord stirlings Division lies just in my rear & will move on with us I propose setting off for your City as soon as I can get the...
I was honoured with your favor of the 20th by Yesterdays post, since which and my Letter, nothing of moment has occurred. The Ships mentioned in my Letter of the 21st to have been in the Offing, got in that day, and are supposed to be part of the Scotch fleet, having landed some Highlanders Yesterday. Inclosed I have the honor to Transmit you Copies of a Letter, and Sundry Resolutions which I...
This will be delivered you by Captn Martindale & Lieutt Turner who were taken last Fall in the Armed Brig Washington, & who with Mr Childs the 2d Lieutt have lately effected their escape from Hallifax. Captn Martindale and these Two Officers have applied to me for pay from the 1st of January till this time, But not conceiving myself authorized to grant It, however reasonable It may be, as they...
I beg leave to be informed, whether Congress have written, or mean to write themselves to Generals Schuyler & St Clair to repair to Head Quarters, or whether they expect me to do it. My reason for this is, the Resolves for their recall, transmitted in your Favor of the 2d Instant do not mention how the same should be communicated. I have the Honor to be with great respect Sir Your Most Hble...
Mr Du Coudray has lain before me a plan of the river, by which it appears, that, for a considerable space between the two sand banks on the East side of Fort-Island, there is from four to four and a half fathom’s depth of water. According to this representation, there would be room for three frigates to lie between those banks, in such a position, as to enfilade the works at Fort-Island, and...
I last night had the Honor of your favor of the 24th with Its inclosures. No Letters came for you from Genl Schuyler, and therefore, agreable to your request, I transmit you a Copy of the One I received from him, and of the material papers, which it covered. Among the Copies, you will find Genl Burgoyn’s instructions at large to Lt Colo. Baum, pointing out the Objects of his Command, when he...
My Conjecture of the Destination of the late Squadron from Boston in my last has been unhappily verified by an Outrage exceeding in Barbarity & Cruelty every hostile Act practised among civilized Nations. I have inclosed the Account given me by Mr Jones a Gentleman of the Town of Falmouth of the Destruction of that increasing & flourishing Village. He is a very great Sufferer & informs me that...
Mr. Duplaine, Consul of France for Boston, will of course have presented you his Exequatur and would also of course receive from you those attentions which his office entitles him to. But Mr. Genet, minister from the same nation here, desirous that the affairs of the two nations should be conducted with that cordiality which animates the two nations, and which would be promoted by the personal...
Your Excellency will be informed by B. Genl De Choisey, who does me the Honor to be the Bearer of this, that the Marquis De Vaudruiel, with a fleet of his most Christian Majesty’s Ships of War, may be soon expected in the Harbour of Boston. By a Correspondence which has passed between the Marquis & the Count de Rochambeau (a Copy of which I have been favored with by the latter) I am informed...
Upon the representation of Mr Morey that two Negro Men belonging to him, were detained as Soldiers in the Massachusett’s Line, contrary to his inclination, I gave directions to Brigadier General Glover to appoint a Board of Officers to enquire into the Justice of his claim, and to report the facts with, their opinion thereon—A Copy of this Report I now do myself the honor to inclose to you. As...
I was yesterday Evening honored with yours of the 14th. I have heard nothing from the Northward since my last. I this day recd Advice from Staten Island that on Sunday Seventy sail of the Enemy’s Ships fell down from the watering place to the Hook but whether they have since gone out to Sea, I have not heard. Till I have more certain information of the State of our Affairs to the Northward,...
His Excellency being called from Head Quarters to day on business of Importance which prevents his Writing, I therefore do myself the honor to inform Congress of what has happened since his Letter of Yesterday. Last Evening the Enemy transported a number of Men from Buchanans to Montezors Island, and by their several movements more strongly indicate their Intention to land somewhere about...
I do myself the Honor to transmit you the Inclosed Letter from Govr Franklin which came this Minute by Express. As Mr Franklin was confined by order of Congress, I could not think myself at liberty to answer him on the subject of his request and therefore have referred it to their consideration. At the same time I would observe his situation is distressing and must interest All our feelings,...