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I do myself the Honor of addressing a few Lines to Congress on a Subject, which appears to me of infinite importance, and to have a claim to their serious attention. The Matter, I allude to, is the Exorbitant price exacted by Merchants & Venders of Goods for every Necessary they dispose of. I am sensible, the trouble and risk in importing, give the Adventurers a right to a generous price, and...
I was honoured with your favor of the 8th Instant by Yesterday morning’s Post with the several Resolves to which you referred my attention. I shall duly regard them, and attempt their execution as far as I am able. By virtue of the discretionary power that Congress were pleased to vest me with, and by advice of such of my General Officers as I have had an opportunity of consulting, I have...
Your favor of the 24th I received on Saturday Evening, and agreable to your request shall expunge the preamble to the Resolution Subjecting the property of Subjects to the British Crown to forfeiture and confiscation. Our Stock of Musquet powder is entirely made up in Cartridges, I therefore request that Congress will Order Four or five Tons more of that sort to be immediately forwarded It...
This will be delivered you by Genl Gates who sets out to day for Congress agreable to my Letter of Yesterday. I have committed to him the Heads of Sundry matters to lay before Congress for their consideration, which from the Interesting Intelligence contained in my last, appear to me of the utmost Importance and to demand their most early and serious attention. Sensible that I have omitted to...
It would have afforded me the greatest pleasure, had I been able to have extended my late visit to Newport as far as Boston, but the important operations, which may be expected to the southward, made it necessary for me to return as soon as possible to the North River, that I might be more immediately in the way of receiving intelligence, and communicating any, which might be essential to the...
I was honoured with your favours of the 21st and 25 Ulto on the 2d Instant, the former by Mr Hanson &c.—the latter by Fessendon—I heartily wish the Money had arrived sooner, that the Militia might have been paid as soon as their time of Service expired —the disappointment has given them great uneasiness & they are gone Home much disattisfied, nor have I been without severe Complaints from the...
Colo. Palfrey having expressed a desire to settle the Accounts of his Office to this time, has obtained my permission to repair to Philadelphia and now waits on Congress with his Books & Vouchers, hoping that a Committee will be appointed to examine and adjust the same. The disadvantages which have arisen to the service and which have been severely felt for want of constant Supplies in the...
I wrote you the 4th instant by express to which I beg you will be reffered—my fears that Broughton & Sillman woud not effect any good purpose were too well founded, they are returned, & brought with them three of the principal inhabitants from the Island of St Johns. Mr Collbuck is president of the Council, acted as Governor[.] they brought the Governors Commission, the Province Seal &a &a. as...
109I. Notes for Letter, 10 July 1775 (Washington Papers)
The time of my arrival. The Situation of the Troops—Works—& things in genl—Enemy on Bunkers Hill. The almost impossibility of giving up the present Incampment in the Face of the Enemy, & after so much work has been bestowd notwithstanding our Situation from the devidedness of it, & length of our lines &ca is by no means desirable. The exceeding difficulty of getting returns of the Forces &ca...
I beg leave to inform Congress that Yesterday morning & in the course of the preceeding night, a considerable body of the Enemy amounting by report to Eight or Nine thousand, and these all British, landed from the Transport Ships mentioned in my Last at Gravesend Bay on Long Island, and have approached within three miles of our Lines, having marched across the Low, cleared Grounds, near the...
The Inclosed came to my hands as a private Letter from Genel Sullivan—As a private Letter I lay it before Congress. The tendency (for it requires no explanation) will Acct for the contrast between it and the Letter of Genl Arnold. That the former is aiming at the Command in Canada, is obvious—whether he merits it or not is a matter to be considered; and that it may be considered with propriety...
Morristown [ New Jersey ] April 12, 1777. Introduces Mauduit du Plessis and recommends his appointment as a captain of artillery. LS , in writing of H, Papers of the Continental Congress, National Archives. John Hancock was President of the Continental Congress. Thomas Antoine, Chevalier de Mauduit du Plessis, was appointed a captain in the Continental artillery on April 15, 1777.
LS and copy: National Archives In our letter of the 1st. instant, we informed you of the lowness of the Continental credit in this Province and the necessity of a speedy supply of hard money: unless this very essential article arrives soon, our forces will suffer exceedingly from the want of many necessaries, particularly flour, which might be laid in much cheaper here than it could be...
I had the honour to address myself to you the 19th instant, Since which I have received undoubted information—that the genuine instructions given to Connolly have not reached your hands—that they Are very artfully Concealed in the tree of his Saddle & coverd with Canvas So nicely, that they are Scarcely discernable—that those which were found upon him are intended to deceive—if he was...
Since my last of the 31st Ulto I have been honoured with your favour of the 22d, Inclosing sundry resolves, which shall, in matters they respect, be made the rule of my conduct. The resolution relative to the Troops in Boston, I beg the favour of you Sir, to assure Congress, shall be attempted to be put in execution, the first moment I see a probability of success, and in such a way, as a...
ALS : National Archives With this You will receive Copies of our two preceding Letters. We find Ourselves obliged to repeat the Necessity of sending immediately the Supply of hard Money therein mentioned. We have tried in vain to borrow some here for the immediate Occasions of the Army, either on the public or our own private Credit. We cannot even sell Sterling Bills of Exchange which some of...
My last to you was on the 20th instant. Since that, I have the pleasure to inform you, that General Dickinson, with about 400 Militia, has defeated a foraging Party of the Enemy of an equal number, and has taken forty Waggons and upwards of an hundred Horses, most of them of the English draft Breed, and a number of Sheep and Cattle which they had collected. The Enemy retreated with so much...
I am particularly to acknowledge that Part of your Favour of the 10th Instt wherein you do me the Honour of determining to join the Army under my Command. I need certainly make no Professions of the Pleasure I shall have in seeing you—At the same Time I have to regret that so little is in my Power to offer equal to Col. Hancock[’s] Merits & worthy his Acceptance. I shall be happy in every Oppy...
Since I had the Honor of addressing you on the 29th Instant, no event of importance has occured. The Enemy are throwing up some Lines and Redoubts in our Front with a view of Canonading as soon as they are ready, and at the same time, are extending their Wings farther by our right and left. It is supposed, that one of their Objects is, to advance a part of their Troops and Seize on the Bridge...
New York, [15] May 1776 . “Since my last of the 11th Instant which I had the honour to address you, nothing of moment or importance has occurred, and the principal design of this, is to communicate to Congress the Intelligence I received last night from General Schuyler by a Letter of the 10th respecting the progress of our Troops in getting towards Canada, not doubting of their impatience and...
Since I had the honor of addressing you Yesterday, nothing of importance has occurred. In respect to the Enemy’s movements, I have obtained no other information, than that they have a number of parties patrolling up and down the River, particularly above. As yet they have not attempted to pass, nor do any of their patrols, though some are exceedingly small, meet with the least interruption...
My Aide de Camp Col. Laurens is charged with a commission of the most critical importance from Congress to the Court of Versailles. The Alliance Frigate is ordered to convey him to France, but from the exhausted state of our continental resources in every department, delays which would be fatal to the objects of his mission are to be apprehended unless the influence of yr Exy or the assistance...
The difficulty, if not impossibility, of giving Congress a just Idea of our situation and of several other important matters requiring their earliest attention by Letter, has induced me to prevail on Major General Greene to wait upon them for that purpose. This Gentleman is so much in my confidence—so intimately acquainted with my ideas—with our strength, and our weaknesses—with everything...
The Enemy advanced Yesterday with a seeming intention of attacking us upon our post near Newport. We waited for them the whole day, but they halted in the Evening at a place called Mill Town about two Miles from us. Upon reconnoitering their Situation, it appeared probable that they only meant to amuse us in front, while their real intent was to march by our Right and by suddenly passing the...
I mean thro you Sir to do myself the Honor of laying before Congress, a Copy of an Address transmitted them some time agoe by the Assembly of Rhode Island, which Governor Cooke favoured me with in the month of January, at the same time requesting me to Interest myself in procuring a body of forces on the Continental establishment for the defence of that Colony. I doubt not but the Address &...
I arrived here this Afternoon with the Army after a very fatiguing March owing to the Roads which have become extremely deep and miry from the late Rains. I intend to proceed in the Morning towards the North River, if the Weather permits; At present it is cloudy and heavy and there is an Appearance of more Rain. By the Express, who will deliver this, I just now received a Letter from Genl...
I beg leave to inform you that since I had the pleasure of addressing you Yesterday Nothing Interesting between the Two Armies has happened. Things remain nearly in the situation they then were. It is with peculiar regret and concern that I have an Opportunity of mentioning to Congress the Sickly condition of our Troops. In some Regiments there are not any of the Field Officers capable of...
Your favour of the 16th with several resolutions of Congress, therein Inclosed, I had not the honor to receive till last Night. before the receipt, I did not think myself at liberty to wait on Congress, altho I wish’d to do it; and therefore, the more readily consented to General Gates’s attendance; as I knew there were many matters which cd be better explaind in a personal Interview than in...
I have been honored with your two favours of yesterday and their inclosures; to which due attention shall be paid. The enemy seem now to be straining every nerve to accomplish their purpose; but I trust, whatever present success they may have, they will ere long experience a reverse of fortune. If they have four thousand men in the Jersies, it is probable, they have something more serious in...
Since I had the Honor of addressing you on the 2d Our affairs have not undergone a change for the better, nor assumed a more agreable aspect than what they then wore. The Militia under various pretences of sickness &c. are daily diminishing & in a little time I am persuaded, their number will be very inconsiderable. On Monday night a Forty Gun Ship passed up the Sound between Governor’s & Long...
I am honoured with your favor of the 30 Ulto and observe what Congress have done respecting the Settlement of the Paymasters accounts. This seems expedient as he is out of office, and I am certain will be attended with but little, if any difficulty, nothing more being necessary than to compare the Warrants with his Debits, and the receipts he has given with his Credits. I wish every other...
His Excellency having gone this Morning to visit our posts beyond Kings bridge and the Several passes leading from Frog’s point and the Necks adjacent, I have the honor to inform you by his command, that no interesting event has taken place since his Letter by Yesterdays post. Every days intelligence from the Convention of this State, holds forth discoveries of New plots, and of new...
I this morning received a Letter of the 7th Instant from Genl Schuyler, a Copy of which and of it’s inclosure, I herewith send you. The intelligence, which they contain, is truly interesting, supposing it just; But it differs so widely from what we had reason to expect from the Accounts mentioned in General St Clairs Letters to Genl Schuyler, Copies of which you would receive in his Letter,...
The bearer hereof Mr. Ciracchi, a celebrated sculptor from Rome, proposing to go to Boston to explain the device of a monument which he wishes to erect for the United States, I take the liberty of introducing him to the notice of your Excellency, persuaded that it is desireable to you to have strangers, of particular merit, particularly made known to you. The things which he has done here...
This will be handed you by Colo. Campbell from the Northern Army, whom the Inclosed Letter and proceedings of a Genl Court Martial will shew to have been in arrest and tried for Sundry matters charged against him. As the Court Martial was by Order of the Commander in that department—the Facts committed there—the Trial there, I am much at a loss to know Why the proceedings were referred to me...
I am taking the earliest occasion of acknowledging the receipt of the letter, which you did me the favor to address to me by Mr Allen; and to thank you for your kind congratulations on my appointment to the Presidency of the United States. Mrs Washington is not here, but is expected in the course of this month; on her arrival I shall not fail of executing the friendly Commission of Mrs Hancock...
If Congress have not yet left Philadelphia, they ought to do it immediately without fail, for the enemy have the means of throwing a party this night into the city. I just now crossed the valleyford, in doing which a party of the enemy came down & fired upon us in the boat by which means I lost my horse. One man was killed and another wounded. The boats were abandon’d & will fall into their...
Your Excellency will oblige me by having the inclosed delivered to Major General Howe should he be in Boston, or forwarding it to him should he be in the neighbourhood or in New Hampshire—The letter is of consequence, and I therefore hope you will excuse the liberty I have taken in addressing it to your particular care. I have the honor to be with very sincere Regard Yr Excellency’s Most obt...
Upon my Arrival here this Afternoon I was informd that an Express was in Town from the provincial Camp in massachusets Bay; and having seen among other papers in his possession a Letter directed to you as president of the Congress I have taken the Liberty to open it. I was induced to take that Liberty by several Gentlemen of New York who were anxious to know the particulars of the Affair of...
I this day receiv’d a Letter from the Count Rochambeau, a copy of which is inclos’d, respecting the Militia from the State of Massachusetts, that were some time since requested for the Rhode Island Department; as they have not arrived agreeable to my expectations, I have to request your Excellency to forward them with the utmost dispatch, as it is of the greatest importance that that post is...
I was honoured with your Favour of the 26th ult: late the Night before last, and a Meeting of the General Officers having been called upon a Business which will make a considerable Part of this Letter, I took the Oppy of laying before them those Parts of yours which respect the Continuance, & new modelling the Army—the Fuel, Cloathing & other Preparations for the ensuing Winter. They have...
A Gentleman this Instant ⟨put the⟩ Inclosed Gazette (containing ⟨the Addre⟩ss & Petition of the Lord Mayor, ⟨Aldermen⟩, & Commons of the City of London) into my hands, desiring I would forward it to you. I accordingly ⟨do⟩ so, and am with very great ⟨regards⟩ and esteem, Sir Yr Most Obedt & Most Hble Serv⟨t⟩ ALS , PHi : Conarroe Collection. The manuscript is torn in several places. This is...
I herewith transmit you an Extract of a Letter from Genl Ward which came to hand by last nights post containing the agreable Intelligence of their having Obliged the Kings Ships to leave Nantasket road, and of Two Transports more being taken by our Armed Vessels with Two hundred and Ten Highland Troops on board. I sincerely wish the like success had attended our Arms in another Quarter, but It...
This will be handed you by Mr Griffin who has also taken upon him the charge and delivery of Two packets containing sundry Letters which were sent to Amboy Yesterday by a Flag, and forwarded to me to day by Genl Mercer. The Letter addressed to Governor Franklin came open to my hands. I was this morning honoured with yours of the 13 Instant with Its important and necessary Inclosures, and in...
Your favor of the 30th Ulto with Its several Inclosures, I was honoured with by Wednesdays post. Congress having been pleased to leave with me the direction of Colo. Wards Regiment, I have wrote to Govr Trumbull and requested him to order their March to this place, being fully satisfied that the Enemy mean to make their Grand push in this Quarter, and that the Good of the service requires...
I am honoured with your several Favours of the 26th, & 30th September, & 5th October. The Contents of which I shall beg Leave to notice in their respective Order. Previous to the Direction of Congress to consult the General Officers on the best Mode of continuing, & providing for the Army during the Winter, I had desired them to turn their Thoughts upon these Subjects, & to favour me with the...
I this morning had the Honor of your Letter of the 5th with its inclosures. The Resolution of the 30th of May, respecting the French Gentlemen, who came passengers in the Amphitrite, reached Camp before your Letter and has excited much uneasiness in the Artillery Corps. The inclosed Copy of a Letter from Genl Knox will convey their anxiety upon the Subject, & which I think it necessary to...
ALS and copy: National Archives; copy: British Library The Bearer Capt. Balm is strongly recommended to me, as a very able Officer of Horse, and capable of being extreamly useful to us, in forming a Body of Men for that Service. As he has otherwise an excellent Character, I take the Liberty of recommending him to my Friends as a Stranger, of Merit, worthy of their Civilities, and to the...
Since I had the Honor of addressing you this morning by the Return Express, the Eastern post arrived. The Intelligence he brought, is agreable and interesting, as you will perceive by the inclosed Letter from Mr Hazard which I do myself the pleasure of transmitting you. I am happy to say, the arrival of the Ship at portsmouth, and the capture of the two prizes, is confirmed, by other Letters...
Col. Portail for himself and in behalf of the Gentlemen with him has made different applications to me for horses and servants; and I have been in a manner under the necessity of furnishing them by way of loan till they can be otherwise provided. They expect these things to be found them at the public expence, and informs me that the matter is now before congress, whose determination they look...