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Inclosed you have an Account of Powder supplyed the Army lately before Boston, by this Colony. We have not been able to procure the proper Vouchers for the delivery of the whole of it to the Army, but as it was delivered on the day of the Battle at Bunker Hill and at other times of Alarm and Confusion, we trust that neglect will be excused. The Account is not supposed to contain the whole of...
I Received the Letters, with which you were pleased to favor me per Mr. Fessenden on Saturday last being the 18th Instant, at a Critical Time for the Army posted at Cambridge. The Evening preceeding Orders were Issued in Consequence of a Consultation between the General Officers and Committee of Safety to take possession of Dorchester Hill and Bunkers hill in Charlestown which I must confess...
Watertown, 11 November 1775. (Misc. Papers of the Continental Congress, Reel No. 8). Although the credentials as passed by the house bear the date 10 November, the Journal of the House of Representatives Journals of the House of Representatives of Massachusetts [1715- ], Boston, reprinted by the Massachusetts Historical Society, 1919- . (For the years for which reprints are not yet available,...
At the same time that we think Ourselves obliged to acknowledge the vigilance and care of our Delegates to the defence of our Colony, and the attention of the Congress to an impartial defence of every part of the united Colonies, in the late provision made for the Massachusetts Bay, their Resolve for adding three more Battalions to those left for the defence of it; we conceive it necessary to...
Whereas John Hancock, Samuel Adams, John Adams, Robert Treat Paine, and Elbridge Gerry Esqrs. have been chosen by joint Ballot of the two houses of Assembly to represent the Colony of Massachusetts Bay in New England in the American Congress untill the first day of January A.D. 1777— Resolved that they or any one or more of them are hereby fully impowered, with the delegates from the other...
We are informed by his Excellency General Washington, that it is his opinion, the paying our Troops, by the Lunar Month, will throw the rest of the Army into disorder, as the Continental Congress have resolved, that it is the Kalender Month they mean to pay by; and that the difference between the two, must be consider’d as a Colonial, and not a Continental Charge. We are sensible, it is...
Watertown, 25 July 1775. FC ( M-Ar : Mass. House of Representatives Records, 57:263). As speaker, James Warren notified JA and the other members of the delegation of their election to the Council and expressed the wish that they would take their seats on the Council as soon as their duties in the congress permitted. Their election to the Council had taken place on 21 July. JA took his seat on...
After the repeal of the late American Stamp Act, we were happy in the pleasing prospect of a restoration of that tranquility and unanimity among ourselves, and that harmony and affection between our parent country and us, which had generally subsisted before that detestable Act. But with the utmost grief and concern, we find that we flatter’d ourselves too soon, and that the root of bitterness...
You have, once more received, the highest Testimony of the Confidence and Affection of your Constituents, which the Constitution has impowered them to exhibit; the Trust of representing them in the great and general Court or Assembly of this Province. This important Trust is committed to you, at a time when your Country demands the Exertion of all your Wisdom Fortitude and Virtue; and...
I am honoured with yours of the 4th inclosing sundry Resolves of Congress from the 29th March to the 5th instant. I am extremely glad to see the Resolve for the immediate removal of Military Stores from Baltimore and Annapolis, for altho’ I do not imagine that the Enemy intend an expedition of any great Consequence in Chesapeak Bay, yet while the Stores lay at the above places, they were...
I do myself the honour to transmit you the inclosed most interesting and agreeable intelligence which I have this moment recd from Genl Putnam. I can scarce doubt but Genl Gates has sent you an Express, but lest he, from the important Business in which he was engaged, should not have done it, I have immediately forwarded it, that you might not be debarred from so great a pleasure an instant...
I last night received the favor of your Letter of the 26th with the Resolves to which it alludes. The views of Congress in sending General Officers to the Eastward, to hasten on the Troops, have been long anticipated. Genl Poor is in New Hampshire for the purpose; General Heath in Massachusets Bay, with Brigadrs Nixon, Glover and Patterson; General Varnum in Rhode Island, and Genl Parsons in...
I have this moment received your Excellen[c]y’s polite letter of today—and have the honor to inform you that in consequence of suggestions made by the Gentlemen from Boston and the Depy Adjut. Genl (whom I met at Worcester this morning) that it would make it more convenient for the troops, many of which lived at a distance from the place of parade, if I should pass through Cambridge at an...
I beg leave to inform you, that since my Letter of the 8th and 9th Instt, which I had the honor of addressing you, Nothing of importance has occurred, except that the Ships of War, which I then mentioned, in their passage up the River, took a Sloop that was at Anchor off the Mouth of Spitendevil, and Two of our Row Gallies, which they out sailed. The Crews finding that they could not prevent...
Since I had the Honor of addressing you Yesterday, Nothing of Importance has occurred and the Enemy remain, as they then were. I was reconnoitring the Country and different Roads all Yesterday, and am now setting out on the same business again. Sensible of the advantages of Light Troops, I have formed a Corps under the command of a Brigadier, by drafting a Hundred from each Brigade, which is...
I herewith transmit you Copies of a Letter from Genl Schuyler and Its several Inclosures which I received since I had the honor of addressing you yesterday. From these you will learn, that Genl Thomas died the 2d Instant, and the apprehensions of our Frontier friends in this Colony that our Savage foes are meditating an attack against them. I must beg leave to refer you to a paragraph in the...
I have the honor and pleasure to inform you that the Enemy evacuated Brunswic this morning and retired to Amboy, burning many Houses as they went along. Some of them from the appearance of the Flames were considerable Buildings. From several pieces of information and from a variety of Circumstances it was evident that a move was in agitation, and it was the general Opinion that it was intended...
I am now to acknowledge the receipt of your favors of the 14 & 18 Instt and the Interesting resolves contained in them, with which I have been honoured. The several matters recommended to my attention shall be particularly regarded, and the directions of Congress and your requests complied with in every instance as far as in my power. The Instituting a War Office is certainly an event of great...
It gives me real pain to learn, that the declining state of your health, owing to your unwearied application to public business, and the situation of your private affairs oblige you to relinquish a station; though but for a time, which you have so long filled with acknowledged propriety. Motives as well of a personal as of a general concern make me to regret the necessity that forces you to...
I yesterday had the Honor of writing you and to advise of our arrival here. I am now to inform you that the Enemy are still advancing and that their Vanguard had proceeded as far as Bonum, a small Town about four miles this side of Woodbridge according to my last intelligence. As to their number reports are various. Some say they were joined yesterday by a considerable reinforcement from...
Inclosed I have the Honor to transmit you a Copy of my Letter to Lord Howe as well on the Subject of a Genl Exchange of prisoners in the Naval Line, as that of Lieutt Josiah in particular, and of his Lordships Answer, which for Its matter and manner, is very different from Genl Carletons Orders which were forwarded Yesterday. The Situation of the Armies being the same, as when I had the...
I do myself the Honour of addressing you in Consequence of an Application from the Commissary General, who is by my Direction taking all proper Precautions on the Approach of Winter. I desired him to commit to writing such Proposals as his Experience & Knowledge of the Country might intitle him to make, which he has done in the Paper which I have the Honour to inclose. The Difficulty of...
I have the honor to inform you, that on yesterday morning the Enemy made a sudden and unexpected movement from the Several posts they had taken in our Front. they broke up their whole Encampments the preceding night, and have advanced towards King’s bridge and the North river. the design of this manuvre, is a matter of much conjecture and speculation, and cannot be accounted for with any...
This will be delivered you by General Arnold, who arrived here to day in his way to Philadelphia. He seems to be anxious to settle his public Accounts, which are of considerable amount, and waits on Congress, hoping they will appoint a Committee of their Body, or of such Gentlemen, as they shall judge proper, to take the matter into consideration. This he considers, the more necessary, as he...
I was yesterday honored with your Letter of the 29th Ulto, inclosing Sundry Resolves. Agreable to the directions of Congress, I have written to the States of New Hampshire and Massachusetts, and urged them to compleat and forward their Troops, destined for Ticonderoga, with all possible expedition. The Brigadiers gone there for the present, are Fermoy—Poor—Patterson & Learned. Nixon & Glover...
Your Favor of this date with its inclosures is now before me. At the same time that I express my thanks for the high mark of confidence which Congress have been pleased to repose in me by their Resolve authorizing me to send an Officer to command the northern Army, I should wish to be excused from making the appointment. For this, many Reasons might be mentioned, and which, I am persuaded will...
I have perused the petition preferred by the Independant Corps of Boston and beg leave thro you to Inform Congress, that the Five Regiments there are extremely deficient in Arms, as are many Other Regiments in Continenta⟨l⟩ pay, and Submit It to their consideration whethe⟨r⟩ any part of the Arms lately taken, under these circumstances shou’d be delivered to the Gentlemen applying for them,...
Captain Desheild of Mr Buchanans Ship from Baltimore who was taken by the Enemy and carried into York made his Escape from thence on Saturday Evening. He informs, that three thousand Troops, British & Hessian, embarked about Ten days ago from the City & Staten Island on board Transports which were laying at the Latter when he came away, he adds that the Enemy have built & are building a number...
I am this Moment Honor’d with yours of 5 OClock this morning, & have accordingly sett the Army in Motion One Division had Cross’d the Deleware the day before Yesterday, & I am in hopes the whole of the Troops now here will be able to reach Philada tomorrow Evening Lord stirlings Division lies just in my rear & will move on with us I propose setting off for your City as soon as I can get the...
Near Pennypackers Mill [ Pennsylvania ] October 5, 1777. Describes the “unfortunate” attack on Germantown. Df , in writings of Robert Hanson Harrison and H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.