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M r De Hogendorp a Lieutenant in the Dutch Guards, in the Service of the Republick of Holland, is going to America in the Suite of M r Vanberckel the Dutch Minister and I am requested by Some respectable Gentlemen to give him Letters of Introduction to Some Persons in America. any Civilities you may please to Shew him, will be gratefully acknowledged, by / Sir your most obedient and / most...
After the repeal of the late American Stamp Act, we were happy in the pleasing prospect of a restoration of that tranquility and unanimity among ourselves, and that harmony and affection between our parent country and us, which had generally subsisted before that detestable Act. But with the utmost grief and concern, we find that we flatter’d ourselves too soon, and that the root of bitterness...
This letter will be delivered you by M r: S. —a Gen t: who has lived sometime in my family at the Hague, in Paris & in London. He will inform you in what manner the late Navigation-Act of the Mass a: has been rec d. here— Some say it is a measure taken in a passion, & not well-weighed in the scales of reason—that we are ruining ourselves—that an act of Parliament will be passed to retaliate...
M r. Hartley, his Britannic Majesty’s Minister Plenipotentiary for negociating the definitive Treaty, has requested of me in the Name of the Prince Carominico, the Neapolitan Ambassador at the Court of S t. James’s, Letters of Introduction for his Cousin Il Comte di Vermé, who is going to visit America. He will be happy in an Opportunity to see so illustrious an American as the Governor of...
You have, once more received, the highest Testimony of the Confidence and Affection of your Constituents, which the Constitution has impowered them to exhibit; the Trust of representing them in the great and general Court or Assembly of this Province. This important Trust is committed to you, at a time when your Country demands the Exertion of all your Wisdom Fortitude and Virtue; and...
I beg leave to introduce to your Excellency, M r. Anstey a Barrister at Law, and member of Parliament, who seems to be an amiable man, and it is to be hoped his Tour to America may have some good effects. By the papers this morning it seems a motion was yesterday made in the house of Commons for an account of the Number of Vessels cleared out from any of the ports in Great Britain, with...
Pursuant to a Resolution of the Legislature of Massachusetts passed the 17th Ultimo we have endeavoured to collect full and Authentic information respecting the Cod and Whale fisheries as heretofore, and now carried on in this Commonwealth. Your Excellency must be sensible that in executing the business assigned us we could derive no Aid from any Public office establish’d in this Government...
LS : National Archives After some difficulty and delay in getting thro’ the ice of Lake George, we arrived here on monday last and were very politely received by General Arnold who at present commands in this Post. It is impossible to give you a just idea of the lowness of the Continental credit here from the want of hard money, and the prejudice it is to our affairs. Not the most trifling...
LS and copy: National Archives In our letter of the 1st. instant, we informed you of the lowness of the Continental credit in this Province and the necessity of a speedy supply of hard money: unless this very essential article arrives soon, our forces will suffer exceedingly from the want of many necessaries, particularly flour, which might be laid in much cheaper here than it could be...
ALS : National Archives With this You will receive Copies of our two preceding Letters. We find Ourselves obliged to repeat the Necessity of sending immediately the Supply of hard Money therein mentioned. We have tried in vain to borrow some here for the immediate Occasions of the Army, either on the public or our own private Credit. We cannot even sell Sterling Bills of Exchange which some of...
LS : National Archives By Col: Campbell, who arrived here early this morning from Quebeck, we are informed that two men of war, two Frigates and one Tender arrived there early on monday the 6th. instant about eleven o’clock the enemy sallied out, to the number, as is supposed, of one thousand men. Our forces were so dispersed at different posts, that not more than two hundred could be...
ALS and copy: National Archives; copy: British Library The Bearer Capt. Balm is strongly recommended to me, as a very able Officer of Horse, and capable of being extreamly useful to us, in forming a Body of Men for that Service. As he has otherwise an excellent Character, I take the Liberty of recommending him to my Friends as a Stranger, of Merit, worthy of their Civilities, and to the...
AL (draft): Library of Congress The Bearer of this, Mr. Holcker, is a Gentleman of excellent Character, of great Credit in this Country, and one of my particular Friends. He can give you good Information of the State of Public Affairs here. I beg leave therefore to recommend him to your Acquaintance, and to all the Civilities you usually show to Strangers of Merit, of which you will find him...
LS : Yale University Library, Smith College Library; AL (draft) and copy: Library of Congress Five Captains of Vessels from Boston who had been carried Prisoners into England, made their Escape from thence lately in an open Boat and arrived on the Coast of Normandy in France. Being Strangers there, destitute of all Acquaintance, they had the good Fortune to meet with M. St. John, a French...
ALS : National Archives We have been here some Days waiting for General Schuyler’s Orders to proceed, which we have just received, and shall accordingly leave this Place to morrow. Tho’ by the Advices from Canada communicated by him to us, and as we suppose sent forward to you, I am afraid we shall be able to effect but little there. We had a heavy Snow here yesterday and the Waters are so...
ALS and copy: National Archives In 30 Days after we left the Capes of Delaware, we came to an Anchor in Quiberon Bay. I remain’d on board four Days, expecting a Change of Wind, proper to carry the Ship into the River Loire; but the Wind seeming fix’d in an opposite Quarter, I landed at Auray, and with some Difficulty got hither, the Road not being well supply’d with Means of Conveyance. Two...
LS : American Philosophical Society; copy: Library of Congress Permit me to repeat my Congratulations on your Election to the Government of your Country, and my best Wishes for your Health & Happiness. A Privateer of this Country having taken an English Packet bound to New York, with her Dispatches, some of which it may be of particular Use to your State that your Excellency should see, as...
AL (draft): Library of Congress I am requested by some Friends of much Consideration in this Country, to recommend to your Excellency’s Protection Messrs. Galatheau & Compere who go over in the Ship Marquis de la Fayette, with a Power of Attorney to call to Account Messrs Peurien & La Fitte of Salem, for a Cargo intrusted with them by Messrs. Barran, Merchants of Bordeaux. Nothing is desired...
I Received the Letters, with which you were pleased to favor me per Mr. Fessenden on Saturday last being the 18th Instant, at a Critical Time for the Army posted at Cambridge. The Evening preceeding Orders were Issued in Consequence of a Consultation between the General Officers and Committee of Safety to take possession of Dorchester Hill and Bunkers hill in Charlestown which I must confess...
[ Philadelphia June 10, 1792. “The period of the session did not permit the subject being brought before Congress, with advantage, previous to their rising. Your excellency however may rely that it shall receive the attention which is due to so benevolent a purpose and to the auspices under which it presents itself.” Letter not found. ] ALS , sold by Dodd, Mead and Company, New York City,...
If Congress have not yet left Philadelphia, they ought to do it immediately without fail, for the enemy have the means of throwing a party this night into the city. I just now crossed the valleyford, in doing which a party of the enemy came down & fired upon us in the boat by which means I lost my horse. One man was killed and another wounded. The boats were abandon’d & will fall into their...
I did myself the honor to write you a hasty line this Evening giving it as my opinion that the city was no longer a place of safety for you. I write you again lest that should not get to hand. The enemy are on the road to Sweedes ford, the main body about four miles from it. They sent a party this evening to Davesers ferry, which fired upon me and some others in crossing it, killed one man,...
I left camp last evening and came to this city to superintend the collection of blankets and cloathing for the army. Mr. Lovel sends to inform me there is an express going off to Congress, and I do myself the honor to communicate a brief state of things, when I left camp. The enemy moved yesterday from where they lay opposite to valley forge &c. higher up the river on their old scheme of...
I this minute returned from our Lines on Long Island where I left his Excellency the General. From him I have It in command to Inform Congress that Yesterday he went there & continued till Evening when from the Enemy’s having landed a considerable part of their Forces and many of their Movements, there was reason to apprehend they would make in a little time a Genl Attack. As they would have a...
His Excellency being called from Head Quarters to day on business of Importance which prevents his Writing, I therefore do myself the honor to inform Congress of what has happened since his Letter of Yesterday. Last Evening the Enemy transported a number of Men from Buchanans to Montezors Island, and by their several movements more strongly indicate their Intention to land somewhere about...
His Excellency being out a reconnoitring and busily engaged in the Affairs of the Army, I have the honor to acknowledge his receipt of your Letter of the 6th with the Resolutions inclosed, which came to hand Yesterday Afternoon. In respect to the Militia requested of Jersey, his Excellency is doubtfull, whether they can be obtained. For Governor Livingston, by a Late letter, informed him, that...
Since I had the Honor of addressing you on the 29th Instant, no event of importance has occured. The Enemy are throwing up some Lines and Redoubts in our Front with a view of Canonading as soon as they are ready, and at the same time, are extending their Wings farther by our right and left. It is supposed, that one of their Objects is, to advance a part of their Troops and Seize on the Bridge...
His Excellency having gone this Morning to visit our posts beyond Kings bridge and the Several passes leading from Frog’s point and the Necks adjacent, I have the honor to inform you by his command, that no interesting event has taken place since his Letter by Yesterdays post. Every days intelligence from the Convention of this State, holds forth discoveries of New plots, and of new...
By command of his Excellency, I have the honor to inform you, that our situation is nearly the same, as when I had the pleasure of writing you last; It is altered in no instance, unless in the number of our Troops, which is every day decreasing by their most scandalous desertion and return Home. The Inclosed Letter from Genl Parsons who is stationed near the Saw pits, and which his Excellency...
The whole of our Army is now here and on the Neighbouring Heights, except the Troops left at Mount Washington & Kingsbridge (about Fourteen hundred at the former & Six hundred at the latter) and Genl Lee’s division, which now forms the Rear & which is on their March. Our Removal & that of the Stores, have been attended with a great deal of Trouble, owing to the scarcity and difficulty of...
The situation of our Affairs not permitting his Excellency to write himself, I have it in charge to inform you, that on Yesterday Morning about Ten OClock the Enemy appeared in several large columns in our front, and from their first movements, seemed, as if they meant an Attack there; However halting for a little time, their Main body filed off to our left, and presently began a most severe &...
I have it in command from his Excellency, to transmit you the inclosed Copies of dispatches which just now came to Hand & which contain Intelligence of the most interesting and important nature, respecting our Affairs in the Northern Department. His Excellency would have wrote himself, but was going to our Several posts, when the Express arrived. The Enemy are pursuing with great Industry...
I am directed by his Excellency to acknowledge his receipt of your favor of the 28th Ulto which came to hand Yesterday Evening and to transmit you a Copy of the Letter I had the honor of writing you by the Boston Express by his command. Had the Express been charged with no Other Letter, the loss would not have been attended with any material injury to us, or advantage to the Enemy, provided it...
Yesterday Evening, I received the honor of your Letter of the 9th with its several Inclosures. I have written to Genl Putnam to detach the Fifteen Hundred Men mentioned by Congress, and inclosed my Letter upon the subject, which you will be pleased to forward to him by the earliest Opportunity. In respect to the Subject of Monsr Du Coudray’s Letter, I would beg leave to observe, however...
The Enemy are now advancing. Their present appearance indicates a disposition to pursue this Route. If they do, I trust, they will meet with a suitable reception and such as will establish our Liberties. They are now advanced near the Brandiwine & have fired Several peices of Artillery. I am Sir with great respect Yr Most Obedt Servt ALS , DNA:PCC , item 152; ADfS , DLC:GW ; copy, DNA:PCC ,...
When I had the Honor of addressing you this morning, I mentioned, that the Enemy were advancing and had began a Canonade; I would now beg leave to inform you, that they have kept up a brisk fire from their Artillery ever since. Their advanced party was attacked by our light Troops under Genl Maxwell, who crossed the Brandiwine for that purpose and had posted his Men on some high Grounds on...
Mr. Duplaine, Consul of France for Boston, will of course have presented you his Exequatur and would also of course receive from you those attentions which his office entitles him to. But Mr. Genet, minister from the same nation here, desirous that the affairs of the two nations should be conducted with that cordiality which animates the two nations, and which would be promoted by the personal...
With many thanks for the papers and information you were pleased to have procured for me on the important subject of the fisheries, I do myself the honour of now inclosing you a copy of my report to the house of representatives. From the disposition I see prevailing in the principal mass of the Southern members to take measures which may secure to us the principal markets for the produce of...
The bearer hereof Mr. Ciracchi, a celebrated sculptor from Rome, proposing to go to Boston to explain the device of a monument which he wishes to erect for the United States, I take the liberty of introducing him to the notice of your Excellency, persuaded that it is desireable to you to have strangers, of particular merit, particularly made known to you. The things which he has done here...
The Representatives of the United States have been pleased to refer to me the representation from the General Court of Massachusetts on the subject of the Whale and Cod fisheries which had been transmitted by your Excellency, with an instruction to examine the matter thereof and report my opinion thereupon to the next Session of Congress. To prepare such a report as may convey to them the...
Your favor of the 30th. together with the resolutions of Congress of the 26th. Ult. came safe to hand. It would argue great insensibility in me could I receive with indifference so confidential an appointment from your body. My thanks are a poor return for the partiality they have been pleased to entertain for me. No cares for my own person, nor yet for my private affairs would have induced...
In a late conversation with Mr. T. Adams since his return from Congress I find, what indeed might have been well supposed that the state of the Continental finances was not the most flourishing. The establishment of banks in Europe for the purpose of maintaining our credit there, as well as here, and by that means of enlarging our supplies by way of loan may perhaps meet with the attention of...
Inclosed you have an Account of Powder supplyed the Army lately before Boston, by this Colony. We have not been able to procure the proper Vouchers for the delivery of the whole of it to the Army, but as it was delivered on the day of the Battle at Bunker Hill and at other times of Alarm and Confusion, we trust that neglect will be excused. The Account is not supposed to contain the whole of...
Whereas John Hancock, Samuel Adams, John Adams, Robert Treat Paine, and Elbridge Gerry Esqrs. have been chosen by joint Ballot of the two houses of Assembly to represent the Colony of Massachusetts Bay in New England in the American Congress untill the first day of January A.D. 1777— Resolved that they or any one or more of them are hereby fully impowered, with the delegates from the other...
At the same time that we think Ourselves obliged to acknowledge the vigilance and care of our Delegates to the defence of our Colony, and the attention of the Congress to an impartial defence of every part of the united Colonies, in the late provision made for the Massachusetts Bay, their Resolve for adding three more Battalions to those left for the defence of it; we conceive it necessary to...
We are informed by his Excellency General Washington, that it is his opinion, the paying our Troops, by the Lunar Month, will throw the rest of the Army into disorder, as the Continental Congress have resolved, that it is the Kalender Month they mean to pay by; and that the difference between the two, must be consider’d as a Colonial, and not a Continental Charge. We are sensible, it is...
Watertown, 11 November 1775. (Misc. Papers of the Continental Congress, Reel No. 8). Although the credentials as passed by the house bear the date 10 November, the Journal of the House of Representatives Journals of the House of Representatives of Massachusetts [1715- ], Boston, reprinted by the Massachusetts Historical Society, 1919- . (For the years for which reprints are not yet available,...
Watertown, 25 July 1775. FC ( M-Ar : Mass. House of Representatives Records, 57:263). As speaker, James Warren notified JA and the other members of the delegation of their election to the Council and expressed the wish that they would take their seats on the Council as soon as their duties in the congress permitted. Their election to the Council had taken place on 21 July. JA took his seat on...
I am honoured with yours of the 4th inclosing sundry Resolves of Congress from the 29th March to the 5th instant. I am extremely glad to see the Resolve for the immediate removal of Military Stores from Baltimore and Annapolis, for altho’ I do not imagine that the Enemy intend an expedition of any great Consequence in Chesapeak Bay, yet while the Stores lay at the above places, they were...
I do myself the honour to transmit you the inclosed most interesting and agreeable intelligence which I have this moment recd from Genl Putnam. I can scarce doubt but Genl Gates has sent you an Express, but lest he, from the important Business in which he was engaged, should not have done it, I have immediately forwarded it, that you might not be debarred from so great a pleasure an instant...