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Mr. Duplaine, Consul of France for Boston, will of course have presented you his Exequatur and would also of course receive from you those attentions which his office entitles him to. But Mr. Genet, minister from the same nation here, desirous that the affairs of the two nations should be conducted with that cordiality which animates the two nations, and which would be promoted by the personal...
[ Philadelphia June 10, 1792. “The period of the session did not permit the subject being brought before Congress, with advantage, previous to their rising. Your excellency however may rely that it shall receive the attention which is due to so benevolent a purpose and to the auspices under which it presents itself.” Letter not found. ] ALS , sold by Dodd, Mead and Company, New York City,...
The bearer hereof Mr. Ciracchi, a celebrated sculptor from Rome, proposing to go to Boston to explain the device of a monument which he wishes to erect for the United States, I take the liberty of introducing him to the notice of your Excellency, persuaded that it is desireable to you to have strangers, of particular merit, particularly made known to you. The things which he has done here...
With many thanks for the papers and information you were pleased to have procured for me on the important subject of the fisheries, I do myself the honour of now inclosing you a copy of my report to the house of representatives. From the disposition I see prevailing in the principal mass of the Southern members to take measures which may secure to us the principal markets for the produce of...
Pursuant to a Resolution of the Legislature of Massachusetts passed the 17th Ultimo we have endeavoured to collect full and Authentic information respecting the Cod and Whale fisheries as heretofore, and now carried on in this Commonwealth. Your Excellency must be sensible that in executing the business assigned us we could derive no Aid from any Public office establish’d in this Government...
Your favour of July 20. came safely to hand, together with the Memorial of Monsieur de Latombe of the 7th of June and the Resolve of the legislature of Massachusetts of the 24th of the same month. on considering the nature of the difficulties which have occurred in the execution of the Consular convention, they appeared to be such as could not be removed but by a legislative act. when these...
Your favor of July 20th. came safely to hand, together with the Memorial of Monsieur de Latombe of the 7th. of June, and the Resolve of the Legislature of Massachusetts of the 24th. of the same month. On considering the nature of the difficulties which have occurred in the execution of the Consular Convention, they appeared to be such as could not be removed but by a legislative Act. When...
The Representatives of the United States have been pleased to refer to me the representation from the General Court of Massachusetts on the subject of the Whale and Cod fisheries which had been transmitted by your Excellency, with an instruction to examine the matter thereof and report my opinion thereupon to the next Session of Congress. To prepare such a report as may convey to them the...
I have been honored with your Excellencys letter of the 10th inst. enclosing a Resolve of the Senate & House of Representatives of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, and sundry documents relative to the Eastern boundary of the United States. Previous to the receipt of your Excellency’s letter I had laid this subject before the Senate of the United States for their consideration, with such...
The President of the United States presents his best respects to the Governor, and has the honor to inform him that he shall be at home ’till 2 o’clock. The President of the United States need not express the pleasure it will give him to see the Governor—but, at the same time, he most earnestly begs that the Governor will not hazard his health on the occasion. Copy, DLC:GW . For background to...
I have this moment received your Excellen[c]y’s polite letter of today—and have the honor to inform you that in consequence of suggestions made by the Gentlemen from Boston and the Depy Adjut. Genl (whom I met at Worcester this morning) that it would make it more convenient for the troops, many of which lived at a distance from the place of parade, if I should pass through Cambridge at an...
A few miles west of this village I met the Express, who delivered me Your Excellency’s letter of yesterday. I have been so fortunate as to proceed thus far without any accident to delay my journey—should nothing occur to prevent me, I shall be at Weston to-morrow night—and I purpose taking dinner so early at Watertown on Saturday, as to reach Cambridge by half past 2 o’clock. Thence I presume...
I am taking the earliest occasion of acknowledging the receipt of the letter, which you did me the favor to address to me by Mr Allen; and to thank you for your kind congratulations on my appointment to the Presidency of the United States. Mrs Washington is not here, but is expected in the course of this month; on her arrival I shall not fail of executing the friendly Commission of Mrs Hancock...
I beg leave to introduce to your Excellency, M r. Anstey a Barrister at Law, and member of Parliament, who seems to be an amiable man, and it is to be hoped his Tour to America may have some good effects. By the papers this morning it seems a motion was yesterday made in the house of Commons for an account of the Number of Vessels cleared out from any of the ports in Great Britain, with...
This letter will be delivered you by M r: S. —a Gen t: who has lived sometime in my family at the Hague, in Paris & in London. He will inform you in what manner the late Navigation-Act of the Mass a: has been rec d. here— Some say it is a measure taken in a passion, & not well-weighed in the scales of reason—that we are ruining ourselves—that an act of Parliament will be passed to retaliate...
The very favorable opinion you are pleased to entertain of my public conduct, and the kind expressions of personal friendship you have had the goodness to repeat in your Letter of the 15th Ulto could not fail to receive my warmest acknowledgments; had not the higher Motives of esteem & attachment already rivitted my affections to you. Accipt my best thanks for the present testimony of your...
I do myself the honor to transmit to your Excellency the Copy of a Letter I have just received from Sir Guy Carleton, informing me of his having given orders for the evacuation of Penobscott. Congress having come to no determination with respect to a Peace Establishment, and the few Troops remaining in Service being on a precarious footing liable to be discharged at every moment, are reasons,...
M r De Hogendorp a Lieutenant in the Dutch Guards, in the Service of the Republick of Holland, is going to America in the Suite of M r Vanberckel the Dutch Minister and I am requested by Some respectable Gentlemen to give him Letters of Introduction to Some Persons in America. any Civilities you may please to Shew him, will be gratefully acknowledged, by / Sir your most obedient and / most...
M r. Hartley, his Britannic Majesty’s Minister Plenipotentiary for negociating the definitive Treaty, has requested of me in the Name of the Prince Carominico, the Neapolitan Ambassador at the Court of S t. James’s, Letters of Introduction for his Cousin Il Comte di Vermé, who is going to visit America. He will be happy in an Opportunity to see so illustrious an American as the Governor of...
The present superiority of the British Fleet upon this Coast, naturally makes the Marquis de Vaudreuil apprehensive for the safety of that under his command in the Harbor of Boston. Should the enemy make an attempt upon him, a land force, superior to what he possesses, will be necessary for his defence, and for that he must depend upon the Militia in the neighbourhood of Boston. I am certain,...
Your Excellency will permit me to introduce to your particular Notice & Attention M. Genl D. Choissny, who will have the Honor to present this Letter. As an Officer old in Command, & eminent for his Services, he has the Honor to be placed at the Head of the Troops destined for the Expedition proposed by the Marquis de Vaudreuil against Penobscot, provided that Enterprize should be attempted....
Your Excellency will be informed by B. Genl De Choisey, who does me the Honor to be the Bearer of this, that the Marquis De Vaudruiel, with a fleet of his most Christian Majesty’s Ships of War, may be soon expected in the Harbour of Boston. By a Correspondence which has passed between the Marquis & the Count de Rochambeau (a Copy of which I have been favored with by the latter) I am informed...
As the plan of Campaign must depend entirely on the means that are put into my hands, of which I have scarcely a conjectural knowledge at this time—and, on the force of the Enemy at their different Posts—I shall be obliged to your Excellency (as the communication between Boston & Hallifax is open to Flags, which frequently pass) for the most accurate account which you can obtain, covertly, of...
I find myself arrived at that period, at which I hoped to have seen the Batallions of the several States compleated to their Establishment, in conformity to the requisition of Congress of the 19th Decr last. The inclosed returns of Recruits, which I have caused to be made up to the 1st Instant, will shew how totally short of my expectation the exertions of the States, have fallen—from your...
LS : Yale University Library, Smith College Library; AL (draft) and copy: Library of Congress Five Captains of Vessels from Boston who had been carried Prisoners into England, made their Escape from thence lately in an open Boat and arrived on the Coast of Normandy in France. Being Strangers there, destitute of all Acquaintance, they had the good Fortune to meet with M. St. John, a French...
I this day receiv’d a Letter from the Count Rochambeau, a copy of which is inclos’d, respecting the Militia from the State of Massachusetts, that were some time since requested for the Rhode Island Department; as they have not arrived agreeable to my expectations, I have to request your Excellency to forward them with the utmost dispatch, as it is of the greatest importance that that post is...
I did myself the Honor to address your Excellency under the 25th June last—requestg that you would be pleased to order 600, of the Militia of your State, which I Supposed to be raising under a former Requisition, to be sent to Albany for the Protection of the Northern & Western Frontier of the State of N. york—to this Letter (as indeed to several others of much earlier Date) I have not had the...
General Heath, in a letter of the 4th inst. informs me that the state have about 52 Pipes of Teneriffe Wine, which they are willing if it will answer as well to send forward to the army in lieu of Rum—as he thought it more than probable that he would have left Boston before my answer could arrive, he desired me to make it to your Excellency—wine cannot be distributed to the soldier insttead of...
I have not been honored with an answer to my several letters of the 24th and 25th of May and of the 2d 4th 15. and 25th of last Month, and am of course unable to form any certain estimate of what may be expected in consequence of my requisitions—this puts me in rather an awkard situation, as I can not give His Excellency Count Rochambeau, who has formed a junction with me, that official...
I find I shall be under the necessity of drawing down all the Continental Troops which are at present upon the Northern frontiers, and as there is very great reason to apprehend an incursion of the Enemy from Canada, I shall be obligd to keep a respectable force of Militia in that quarter, in addition to the State Troops of New York; I have therefore taken the liberty to order the quotas from...
I flatter myself that proper Measures have been before this Time taken to procure the number of Men for Continental and Militia service, required by my Letter of the 24th May from Weathersfield. For the Calculation which I then made of the Aid of Militia which would be necessary to support the Operations which we have in View, I included sixteen hundred from Pennsylvania, but that State having...
One thousand Militia in addition to four hundred Troops having been deemed necessary to the security of the fleet, in the harbour of Newport, after the departure of the land Forces, I am to request Your Excellency to give orders for Five hundred from the State of Massachusetts to repair to Rhode Island as soon as they shall be demanded by His Excellency the Count de Rochambeau—The State of...
The proposed operations of the campaign will occasion such a demand for heavy cannon and military stores, as to exceed the number and quantity of those articles immediately in possession of the Continent. This insufficiency obliges me to apply to such of the neighbouring States as can afford us any assistance, with a full confidence that the importance of the object, and the apparent...
The great demand we shall have for powder in the proposed operations of the campaign constrains me to request a loan of this article, of the States who are possessed of it, to supply the deficiency of the Continental magazine. I therefore, Sir, earnestly request as great a loan of powder of the State of Massachusetts as can possibly be spared, and that the State would take most speedy and...
LS : American Philosophical Society; copy: Library of Congress Permit me to repeat my Congratulations on your Election to the Government of your Country, and my best Wishes for your Health & Happiness. A Privateer of this Country having taken an English Packet bound to New York, with her Dispatches, some of which it may be of particular Use to your State that your Excellency should see, as...
Your Excellency will oblige me by having the inclosed delivered to Major General Howe should he be in Boston, or forwarding it to him should he be in the neighbourhood or in New Hampshire—The letter is of consequence, and I therefore hope you will excuse the liberty I have taken in addressing it to your particular care. I have the honor to be with very sincere Regard Yr Excellency’s Most obt...
AL (draft): Library of Congress I am requested by some Friends of much Consideration in this Country, to recommend to your Excellency’s Protection Messrs. Galatheau & Compere who go over in the Ship Marquis de la Fayette, with a Power of Attorney to call to Account Messrs Peurien & La Fitte of Salem, for a Cargo intrusted with them by Messrs. Barran, Merchants of Bordeaux. Nothing is desired...
It would have afforded me the greatest pleasure, had I been able to have extended my late visit to Newport as far as Boston, but the important operations, which may be expected to the southward, made it necessary for me to return as soon as possible to the North River, that I might be more immediately in the way of receiving intelligence, and communicating any, which might be essential to the...
I had the honor of receiving your Excellency’s favor of the 5th by General Warner, to whom I gave every advice and assistance relative to the distribution of the generous donation of the State to their old Soldiers. This well timed gratuity has had, I am informed, a most happy effect, and I have not the least doubt, but if the future Supplies of pay—Cloathing and provision, the two last in...
Major General Howe having an inclination—during our present moments of tranquility & the inactivity of the Season—to visit Rhode Island and Boston, I take the liberty of introducing him to your Excellency’s acquaintance as he may not have the pleasure of being personally known to you. incomplete CSmH .
I should not trouble Your Excellency, with such reiterated applications on the score of supplies, if any objects less than the safety of the Posts on this River, and indeed the existence of the Army, were at Stake.By the enclosed Extracts of a Letter of Yesterday from Major General Heath, you will see our present situation, and future prospects. If therefore the supply of Beef Cattle demanded...
My Aide de Camp Col. Laurens is charged with a commission of the most critical importance from Congress to the Court of Versailles. The Alliance Frigate is ordered to convey him to France, but from the exhausted state of our continental resources in every department, delays which would be fatal to the objects of his mission are to be apprehended unless the influence of yr Exy or the assistance...
I have been honored with your Excellency’s favors of the 17th of November and 22d of December. The first by some accident, had gone forward to Philadelphia and only reached me, by the post from thence, the 7th inst. Your Excellency will have had good reason to suppose me guilty of neglect in not answering, sooner, so polite a renewal, on your part, of the correspondence which had been...
It is with extreme anxiety and pain of mind, I find myself constrained to inform your Excellency, that the event I have long apprehended would be the consequence of the complicated distresses of the Army has at length taken place. On the night of the first instant a mutiny was excited by the Non-Commissioned Officers and Privates of the Pennsylvania Line, which soon became so universal as to...
Upon the representation of Mr Morey that two Negro Men belonging to him, were detained as Soldiers in the Massachusett’s Line, contrary to his inclination, I gave directions to Brigadier General Glover to appoint a Board of Officers to enquire into the Justice of his claim, and to report the facts with, their opinion thereon—A Copy of this Report I now do myself the honor to inclose to you. As...
In a late conversation with Mr. T. Adams since his return from Congress I find, what indeed might have been well supposed that the state of the Continental finances was not the most flourishing. The establishment of banks in Europe for the purpose of maintaining our credit there, as well as here, and by that means of enlarging our supplies by way of loan may perhaps meet with the attention of...
AL (draft): Library of Congress The Bearer of this, Mr. Holcker, is a Gentleman of excellent Character, of great Credit in this Country, and one of my particular Friends. He can give you good Information of the State of Public Affairs here. I beg leave therefore to recommend him to your Acquaintance, and to all the Civilities you usually show to Strangers of Merit, of which you will find him...
Your Favor of the 25th I received on Monday Afternoon. You have my warmest wishes for your recovery, and I shall be happy, if your recess should be attended with benefits superior to your most sanguine expectations. Your exertions to promote the Genl Interest I am well convinced will be unceasing and that every measure, the situation of your health will permit you to pursue will be employed to...
I do myself the honor of transmitting to Congress the inclosed copies of sundry letters just now received, and congratulate them most sincerely on the important intelligence which they contain. The damage the Enemy have sustained in their Ships, I hope will prevent their future attempts to gain the passage of the river, and the repulse of the Troops under Count Donnop and his Captivity, I...
[ Whitpain Township, Pennsylvania ] October 22, 1777 . Regrets that Hancock is forced to retire as President of Continental Congress because of poor health and the pressure of private affairs. LS , in writing of H, George Washington Photostats, Library of Congress.