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The Subscribers appointed on the part of Mr. Hamilton and Mr. Burke to consider whether there was an honorable Ground of accomodation between the parties in respect to certain Expressions made use of by Mr. Burke in the house of Representatives on Wednesday last, relatively to an Eulogium pronounced by Mr. Hamilton on general Green on the 4th. of July last, having inquired into the...
You will recieve herewith enclosed a Publication by Mr Genet denying his having declared that he wd. appeal from the President to the People —a publication by us that we would shortly proceed to state the Evidence and Circumstances relative to that Transaction, and also our manuscript address to the public containing such Statemt. We think it more expedient as well as more delicate with...
I have made an arrangement to forward by express the result of the convention of New Hampshire to Springfield in this State, from which place Genl. Knox has engaged a conveyance to you at Poughkeepsie. Those who are best informed of the situation of the Question in New Hampshire are positive that the Decision will be such as we wish, and from the particular Facts which I have heard, I can...
[ London, January 19, 1799 . Letter not found. ] Letter listed in “Memorandum of Private Letters, &c., dates & persons, from 1796 to Augt 1802,” owned by Mr. James G. King, New York City.
The fall of Bank certificates may have some good effects, it will operate to deter our industrious citizens from meddling in future with the funds, & teach them contentment in their proper vocations. So far as I am informed, the loss will be divided among a great number of individuals, and where it is heaviest, the sufferers will generally be characters who will neither excite nor deserve...
[ London, April 19, 1799. Letter not found. ] “List of Letters from … Mr. King” to H, Columbia University Libraries.
[ London, August 1, 1798. Letter not found. ] Letter listed in Rufus King’s “Memorandum of Private Letters, &c., dates & persons, from 1796 to Augt 1802,” owned by Mr. James G. King, New York City.
The inclosed letter will give you all the information that we have on the Subject to wh. it relates. It seems problematical whether PH. can be induced to agree in the arrangement —some circumstances of which I have lately heard incline me to believe that he will not. Our session will close by the first of June provided no farther impediment is thrown in the way of the Provision for giving...
Immediately after the publication of the Letter from the french Government to their Minister Barthelemi at Basle, announcing their determination to seize the cargoes of neutral vessels destined to the English Ports, I wrote to Mr. Monroe informing him that the Br. Gov. disavowed the having issued any recent order for the capture of neutral Cargoes bound to french Ports as alledged in the...
[ London, September 25, 1798. Letter not found. ] Letter listed in Rufus King’s “Memorandum of Private Letters, &c., dates & persons, from 1796 to Augt 1802,” owned by Mr. James G. King, New York City.
We have the new york Papers to the 15. ult. These contain the Speech as well as the answers of the two Houses. All seems intended for the best, but it gives an ill Idea abroad of our Zeal, to find that our Army decreed so many months since remained to be raised. The difficulty and time necessary to find suitable Officers, reminds one of the like impediments which preceded the appointment of...
[ London, July 23, 1802. King’s description of this letter reads: “General Hamilton. Determination to return home &c.” Letter not found. ] Rufus King’s “Memorandum of private Letters, &c., dates & persons from 1796 to Augt 1802,” owned by Mr. James G. King, New York City.
France will pursue with us the Plan that she has elsewhere found successful. She will endeavour to overthrow us by the Divisions among ourselves which she will excite and support by all the means of which she is mistress. The Paris Papers of the 18. ulto. say le Citoyen Roziers est nommé Consul Genl. aux Etats unis. Gamier (en convenl. de Saintes) consul, & Boscq vice consul à Wilmington,...
The same uncertainty continues respecting the recommencement of the war. Both austria & Prussia are bolder than before the late naval success of this Country, but the conduct of the Emperor is rather calculated to shew that he may be purchased by further acquisitions in Italy. Naples will not decline a war; her existence perhaps depends upon his provoking it. The Casus fœderis with austria is...
Since my letter of the 24th. I have recd. yrs. of the same date; and after maturely reflecting upon the subject, and consulting one or two of our friends here I am confirmed in the Sentiment that I ought not to consent to be a candidate for the Govr. shd. the federalists think of offering me. This being my determination, it is right that I shd apprize you of it, in order that our friends may...
[ London, February 4, 1797. Letter not found. ] Letter listed in Rufus King’s “Memorandum of private Letters, &c., dates & persons, from 1796 to Augt 1802,” owned by Mr. James G. King, New York City.
Mr. Elliot, who, it has been said, was appointed, will not come to America; owing, say his friends here, to a disinclination on his part, that has arisen from the death of his eldest, or only son. Mr. Seaton yesterday read me an extract of a letter from London, dated Feb. 2. and written as he observed by a man of information, which says ‘Mr. Fraser is appointed Plenipotentiary to the U. S. of...
In general I agree in the Course you recommend. Separate Bills will be reported to the House this morning, providing for the Sp. Ind. & Alg. Treaties—they will pass the H. and be sent to the Senate by the middle of the week. I percive no impropriety in adding to the first of these Bills recived by the Senate, and in succession to each of them if requisite, a Provision for the Br. Treaty. Such...
I have had the pleasure to receive your Letter of the 16. of Decr. and I need not express the Satisfaction which the information that it contained afforded me, the Probable termination of the Election of Pr. the general Temper of the Country, & the Effect likely to be produced by Mr. Adet’s notes are such as I had not only hoped but expected; if by prudence & Firmness, which have hitherto kept...
The french fleet from the Chesapeak arrived here yesterday, and are in the north river above the Battery. The Ambuscade also arrived last Evening and her accounts, confirmed by those of many Spectators of the combat, have no doubt of the Flight of the English Frigate. (You will have seen in our news papers, an invitation for a meeting in the Fields to address Mr. Genest who is daily expected...
Care has been taken to put our friends at the eastward on their guard. Measures have been pursued to ascertain opinions in different quarters, and on this as on a former occasion, the object may be silently abandoned should it appear absolutely desperate. If Clinton should be supported this will be the case; if not the Party must resort to some other northern character, hence the Hopes of this...
We have certain intelligence that the Toulon expedition has sailed. The number of Troops, of Transports, and of men of war are variously stated, but it is known that Buona parte commands and that the fleet is a very great one—its Destination is the subject of inquietude and of conjecture. A few Days will bring us more perfect accounts, and from the Force and Position of the Br. fleet under Ld....
I send you inclosed an interesting little piece addressed to Gallatin by a former Citizen of Geneva—if translated and published it may do good. We have no news from the mediterranean since the Capture of Malta, nor can we do more than conjecture the future destination of Buonaparte. Turin with its arsenals is possessed by a french army, so that Sardignia is at the feet of the Directory. The...
No satisfactory Opinion can yet be formed concerning the termination of the negotiations for Peace. Even those who are supposed to have the best information are without confidence—on the one Hand peace may be concluded sooner than any one thinks probable, on the other the negotiations at Lisle and montebello may be suddenly broken off, and France again engaged with austria as well as England....
After further enquiry, I annex little credit to the notice posted at Loyds’, that two american vessels had been carried into Algiers. Two vessels the Franklin morris master, and the Rose (master not known) said to be of Philadelphia, are reported to have been taken by the cruisers of morocco or some other of the Barbary Powers. These are also the vessels which are mentioned at Loyds as having...
The Petitions of the Merchants and others will be printed today, and it is said they have been signed by almost every Merchant & Trader in the City —Pettit, Barclay, & some few others are exceptions. A counter Petition has been very industriously carried through the City and its Suburbs; and though very few merchants, Traders, or principal mechanicks have signed it, it will shew a long...
Averse to any connexion with the war beyound what may be permitted by the laws of strict neutrality, we are pleased to see the Proclamation. I have no precedents with which to compare it, but I could have wished to have seen in some part of it the word “Neutrality,” which every one would have understood and felt the force of. Having anxiously considered the point respecting which we conversed...
I send you Dunlap of this Morning, in it you have the foreign intelligence. Fenno Dunlap & others have erroneously stated that Mr Warder brought the Ratification of Great Britain—no official Dispatch has been received. Rutledge was negatived yesterday by the Senate. From present appearances the address to the President by the House will pass without a Debate. The Draft has been by agreement in...
[ London, October 20, 1799. Letter not found. ] “List of Letters from … Mr. King” to H, Columbia University Libraries.
[ New York, March 24, 1791. “The Legislature of this State have incorporated the Bank, limiting its capital to a million of Dollars and its duration to twenty years . The Treasurer is authorised to subscribe to the Loan proposed to Congress all the Continental paper in the Treasury and by a bill that passed the Legislature this morning, he is directed to take in behalf of the State, one...
[ London, January 27, 1799. Letter not found. ] Letter listed in “Memorandum of Private Letters, &c., dates & persons, from 1796 to Augt 1802,” owned by Mr. James G. King, New York City.
The french still maintain themselves in switzerland tho’ unless soon and strongly reinforced they will be driven out of it. The success of the Allies has been almost uninterupted in Italy, from whence according to present appearances the Enemy must be in a short time be totally expelled. Thus far the Coalition has performed Prodigies—but the confederates are not without mutual Jealousies,...
[ London, June 21, 1799. Letter not found. ] “List of Letters from … Mr. King” to H, Columbia University Libraries.
[ London, June 8, 1798. Second letter of June 8 not found. ] In the “List of Letters from … Mr. King” to H, Columbia University Libraries, two letters from King for June 8, 1798, are listed.
Unless greater attention is given to the procuring of the requisite evidence in the Cases of Capture than has yet been done, we shall ultimately meet with serious Losses, and give occasion to much Complaint. The Sufferers depend on the Government, and the Government on the Sufferers, and thus that wh. shd. be done is omitted. I inclose to you a copy of notes wh. Mr. Gore & I made this morning...
[ London, July 21, 1798. Kings notation of this letter reads: “Hamilton. Duplicates of address Gallatin.” Letter not found. ] Letter listed in Rufus King’s “Memorandum of Private Letters, &c., dates & persons, from 1796 to Augt 1802,” owned by Mr. James G. King, New York City. See King to H, July 14, 1798 .
[ London, April 29, 1799. Letter not found. ] “List of Letters from … Mr. King” to H, Columbia University Libraries.
Lord Malmesbury will leave London in three or four Days for Lille where the conferences between this Country and France are to be held. Opinions fluctuate concerning the Probability of peace. A Struggle evidently exists in France between the Directory & the Legislature, in the latter of which Bodies it is supposed there is a sincere desire of Peace. Some late proceedings in the Legislature, or...
Both as a friend and a father I do most unfeignibly participate and condole with you in the heavy affliction that has fallen upon your family. It would be altogether vain for me to have recourse to the usual Topics of consolation, in so severe a Calamity: it must be sought for among the treasures of your own Mind, which nature has so eminently endowed; and after a while, it will likewise be...
Tho’ I have very great confidence in the integrity of my Agent Mr Low, I Consider it to be a measure of prudence to be attentive to the Security of my property in his hands: I don’t know that he is much connected in any of those Speculations which too many of our friends have gone into, nor have I any reason to suppose him engaged in any business of hazard. Still I have concluded to request...
[ Margate, England, September 13, 1798. Letter not found. ] Letter listed in Rufus King’s “Memorandum of Private Letters, &c., dates & persons, from 1796 to Augt 1802,” owned by Mr. James G. King, New York City.
By Dr. Romayne I send you a pamphlet lately written upon the interesting subject of the public credit of this Country. The author is a member of parliament an old & practical Banker, Brother to the president of the Bank of England, and for many years much conversant with the great money operations of the Country. When you have read it I wish the favour of you to send it together with the other...
It will not surprise you to hear that an open Scism, accompanied by mutual reproaches took place between our Envoys before they separated. Mr. Gerry remains at Paris; and there is a strong opinion that great pains will be taken to persuade him to consent to a public reception, in order to deceive and mock his Country with overtures of an insidious negociation. Marshall & Pinckney left Paris...
[ Philadelphia, June 10, 1795. On June 11, 1795, Hamilton wrote to King : “I thank you for your letter of the 10th.” Letter not found. ]
The same uncertainty continues to perplex us concerning the Recommencement of the war. One day we are told that Naples has really begun & that Austria is on the way to support her; the next, that Naples is kept back by Austria to whom the Directory have made the most Advantageous offers. It is certain that france feels the change that has within the last six months taken place in Europe and is...
[ London, June 27, 1798. Letter not found. ] “List of Letters from … Mr. King” to H, Columbia University Libraries.
If the enemies of the Government are secret and united we shall lose Mr. Adams. Burr is industrious in his canvass and his object is well understood by our Antis. Mr. Edwards is to make interest for him in Connecticut, and Mr Dallas who is here, and quite in the Circle of the Governor & the Party, informs us that Mr. Burr will be supported as V. President in Pennsylvania. Should Jefferson &...
[ London, February 26, 1800. Letter not found. ] Letter listed in Rufus King’s “Memorandum of Private Letters, &c., dates & persons, from 1796 to Augt 1802,” owned by Mr. James G. King, New York City.
[ London, December 18, 1799. Letter not found. ] “List of Letters from … Mr. King” to H, Columbia University Libraries.
I am charmed with the military appointments; in the main they are quite what they should be—such chiefs ought to give Glory as well as Security to their Country, and they will do both, if the occasions offer. You see that I relapse into my former strain. I know not what you and others whose Sentiments I respect may think, but I must unsettle all that is best settled in my opinions of the...