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    • Hartley, David
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    • Franklin, Benjamin
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Documents filtered by: Author="Hartley, David" AND Recipient="Franklin, Benjamin" AND Period="Revolutionary War"
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ALS : Historical Society of Pennsylvania; copy: William L. Clements Library I find that the Answer wch I received in form from the American Ministers to that note wch I transmitted by Mr Adams, runs, that they will come to my Lodgings at Paris, tomorrow morning, for the purpose of signing the Treaty in Question. Mr Adams and Mr Jay understand it so and propose to come. Upon so great a Crisis...
ALS : William L. Clements Library; copies: Library of Congress, Massachusetts Historical Society, National Archives; press copy of copy: National Archives As the day is now fixed for the signatures of the Definitive treaties between Great Britain France and Spain I beg leave to inform you that I am ready to sign the Definitive treaty between Great Britain and the united States of America...
Copies: Public Record Office, Library of Congress, Massachusetts Historical Society August 12 and 13 were of far greater diplomatic consequence than this exchange of formal letters about the birth of an English princess (the present letter and the commissioners’ answer of the following day) would suggest. On Tuesday, August 12, at the weekly meeting of ministers at Versailles, Franklin and...
Copies: Massachusetts Historical Society (two), William L. Clements Library, Library of Congress, National Archives (two); transcript: National Archives When the American peace commissioners saw David Hartley at Versailles on Tuesday, June 17, they told him that Congress had issued an order on April 24 opening American ports to British vessels—or so they understood from credible private...
Copies: Library of Congress (two), William L. Clements Library, Massachusetts Historical Society, National Archives; press copy of copy: National Archives It is agreed, that the Citizens of the United States of America shall be permitted to import into and to export from any Port or Place of the Territories belonging to the Crown of Great Britain in American Ships, any Goods, Wares &...
Copies: Library of Congress, William L. Clements Library, Massachusetts Historical Society; two incomplete copies and incomplete transcript: National Archives The American peace commissioners grew increasingly suspicious as they waited for Fox to respond to the article that Hartley had presented to them without prior approval on May 21. Hartley drafted another memorial for them on June 1, but...
Copies: National Archives (two), Library of Congress, Massachusetts Historical Society, Public Record Office; transcript: National Archives The proposition which has been made for an universal & unlimited reciprocity of Intercourse & Commerce, between Great-Britain and the American United-States, requires a very serious Consideration on the part of Great-Britain, for the reasons already stated...
ALS : Library of Congress Will you be so good as to send me Mr Maddison’s pamphlet, the time is come for me to return. Be so good as to send me the memorials of the merchants trading to Carolina & Georgia. I must take copies in case of any future correspondence upon the Subject— Can you & Mr Franklin do me the favour to dine with me on Saturday next at 3 o’clock Addressed: A Son Excellence /...
Paris, 21 May 1783. PRINTED: JA , D&A , 3:131–134 . LbC ( Adams Papers ); APM Reel 109. LbC-Tr ( Adams Papers ); APM Reel 103. This memorial was Hartley’s response to the article that the commissioners had proposed on 29 April to open American and British ports to virtually unrestricted free trade, to which Hartley had at least tentatively agreed ( calendared, above
(I) Copies: Massachusetts Historical Society (four), William L. Clements Library, Library of Congress, National Archives (four); press copy of copy: National Archives; (II) Copies: Massachusetts Historical Society (four), Archives du Ministère des affaires étrangères, William L. Clements Library, Library of Congress, National Archives (four); press copy of copy: National Archives Formal...
ALS : Library of Congress The Duke of Manchester is come. I have seen Mr Adams & Mr Jay this Morning. They both intend to pay their respects to his Grace I believe this evening or tomorrow morning— I have not seen Mr Jay but I presume he will do the same. I take the liberty to inform you of this. Yours ever affecly Addressed: To Dr Franklin / &c &c &c / Passy Endorsed: Mr Hartley May 3. 1783...
D : Massachusetts Historical Society; copy: Public Record Office David Hartley arrived in Paris on April 24. The following day he called on the individual American peace commissioners and found them eager to arrange for the opening of British and American ports to each other’s trade and to conclude as quickly as possible a definitive treaty of peace. On April 26 he went to Versailles,...
(I) Copy: Massachusetts Historical Society; (II) copies: Massachusetts Historical Society, Public Record Office; (III) copy: Massachusetts Historical Society I send you a Paper entitled Supplemental Treaty , the Substance of which I sent you some time ago, as I read it, in part of a Speech in the H. of Commons. I have given a Copy of it to M. L [Laurens], as the Grounds upon which my Friend...
Copy: Massachusetts Historical Society It is a long while since I have heard from you or indeed since I writ to you. I heartily congratulate you upon those pacific events which have already happened and wish to see all other final Steps of Conciliation succeed speedily. I send you Copies of two Papers which I have already communicated to Mr. Laurens the one called conciliatory Propositions in...
ALS : American Philosophical Society As I enclose this in the same cover as one from my Brother, his letter anticipates every thing that I have to say to you at present. I beg leave to join in the recommendation to you of Mr Joshua Grigby who with the Spirit of Youth & activity wishes to see the new world. I hope the future intercommunication between this Country and America will obliterate...
ALS : Library of Congress I take the opportunity of Mr Laurens going to Paris to transmitt one line to you, only to express to you my constant & affectionate remembrance of you, in your public character, & as a private friend; And my sincerest wishes for your personal health & happiness, and for success to all your pacific Counsels. The report wch prevails at present on this side of the water,...
ALS : Library of Congress I beg leave to recommend to your attention the enclosed case of Mr James Nassau Colleton. I do it the more readily because it seems to me to be an equitable claim and because I think every example of compliance on any side with claims of equity and justice will at some time or other emerge in the general account of benevolence & conciliation. Mrs Margaret Colleton...
ALS : Library of Congress I am very sorry to hear of your illness, but I hope that one of your Complaints the Gout will after you have paid off the Score give you a renewed lease of health and strength. As to the Gravel I presume you know very well that the Sope boiler’s ley (wch must be nearly the same in all Countries) is a specific. It is so likewise for the Stone but that is a very...
Reprinted from William Temple Franklin, ed., Memoirs of the Life and Writings of Benjamin Franklin … (3 vols., 4to, London, 1817–18), II , 394–6. Yours I received by Major Young together with the work of your veritable philosophe , which is full of humanity. I was not before that, at a loss where I should have looked for my veritable philosophe in the present actual scene of public politics....
Copy: William L. Clements Library You will have heared before you Receive this that Mr T. Td. is appointed Secretary of State for that department to which the American Corespondence belongs. He is, & has been for many years one of my most intimate Friends. A more honourable & honest Man do’s not exist. I have been Requested, in connection with him to undertake one branch of his Office,...
Reprinted from William Temple Franklin, ed., Memoirs of the Life and Writings of Benjamin Franklin … (3 vols., 4to, London, 1817–18), II , 385–6. To a person who no longer thinks of American dependence, what disadvantage can there be in making its independence a fixed article (whether the treaty succeeds or no) instead of making it a first article of the treaty, and so to depend on the success...
(I) and (II) ALS : Library of Congress I take the liberty of recommending to your acquaintance a gentleman of this Country (Mr Bowles) who has been bred to the profession of the law. He has some thoughts of settling in America, I believe with a view to practise the law, or to make some other establishments there, such as he may find most suitable upon trial of the Case. He is at present making...
Reprinted from William Temple Franklin, ed., Memoirs of the Life and Writings of Benjamin Franklin … (3 vols., 4to, London, 1817–18), II , 349–50. Yours of the 13th instant I received by Mr. Oswald. I did not doubt but that the news of a general and absolute release of the American prisoners which Lord Shelburne was so good to communicate to me, in answer to that part of your letter of the 5th...
Transcripts: National Archives, Massachusetts Historical Society I wrote you a long Letter dated May 1st. 1782. by Mr. Laurens, who left London on Saturday last, but I will add a few Lines now by a Conveyance, which I believe will overtake him, just to tell you two or three Things, which, I believe, I omitted in my last. Perhaps they may not be of any Consequence; but, as they relate to my own...
Transcripts: National Archives, Massachusetts Historical Society I write to you only one Line just to inform you that a general Order is issued, by our Government, for the release of all the american Prisoners every where. I have had this from Lord Shelburne, who informed me that the Order was not partial or conditional, but general and absolute. I heartily congratulate you upon this first...
Transcripts: National Archives, Massachusetts Historical Society I have received a Packet from you containing several Letters of various Dates. As I shall probably have a safe Opportunity of Conveyance to you when Mr. Laurens leaves this Country, I am now sitting down to write to you an omnium Kind of a Letter, of various Matters as they occur. The late Ministry being departed, I may now speak...
Reprinted from William Temple Franklin, ed., Memoirs of the Life and Writings of Benjamin Franklin … (3 vols., 4to, London, 1817–18), II , 289–90. You will have heard before this can reach you, that Lord North declared yesterday in the House of Commons that his Majesty intended to change his ministers. The House is adjourned for a few days to give time for the formation of a new ministry. Upon...
Reprinted from William Temple Franklin, ed., Memoirs of the Life and Writings of Benjamin Franklin … (3 vols., 4to, London, 1817–18), II , 287–9. Enclosed with this I transmit to you the public parliamentary proceeding respecting the American war. If you will compare these proceedings with some others in several of the counties of this kingdom about two years ago, you will at once see the...
Reprinted from William Temple Franklin, ed., Memoirs of the Life and Writings of Benjamin Franklin … (3 vols., 4to, London, 1817–18), II , 286. Mr. Digges who will deliver this to you informs me that having been applied to for the purpose of communicating with Mr. Adams on the subject of his commission for treating of peace, he is now setting out for Amsterdam, and that he intends afterwards...
Reprinted from William Temple Franklin, ed., Memoirs of the Life and Writings of Benjamin Franklin … (3 vols., 4to, London, 1817–18), II , 282–3. I have not as yet any thing to communicate to you. I have upon many occasions recommended the road to peace in the most earnest way. I am not without hopes. I think I may venture to say that the arguments which I have stated have made an impression....