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I received, but yesterday your Letter of the 30th of August. Convinced of the Wisdom and Sound Policy of this Measure of Government, I accept with Pleasure your Commission: and will execute it to the best of my Capacity and in as Short a time as possible. My field of Investigation is however so narrow the very little can be can be expected from, Sir your / humble Servant PHC : Charles Roberts...
In undertaking to give you an account of the Manafactories in this neighbourhood I am apprehensive, I have, engaged more than I shall be able to perform to your satisfaction. From my earliest Recollection, it has been a common observation that within two or three years, after a general Peace in Europe, American Commerce has declined to such a degree as to introduce Distress among the People...
I am obliged to borrow a hand to thank you for your favour of March 11th. and for introducing to me, Mr Binon—whom I find to be a Gentleman of Sense and Letters—as well as Taste and skill—in all the fine Arts—He has been an agreeable Companion—and we have been fortunate enough to procure the best Accommodations Accommodations for him— Excuse me for I can barely write the name of your Friend,...
The President having determined to send to Algiers fifteen long brass Cannon, suitable for batteries, viz. ten twenty four pounders and five eighteen pounders, with their Carriages and necessary apparatus, and as the materials and means of fabricating them exist in your Department, I have the honor to request that you will be pleased, if convenient, to cause them to be prepared. The expense...
The Secretary of State presents his respects to the Secretary of War, and has the honor to inform him, that it has been determined that the brass cannon for the Dey of Algiers may be cast according to the dimensions originally intimated, and according to which Mr. Foxall has prepared the apparatus. Letterbook copy ( DNA : RG 59, DL , vol. 14). For the brass cannon for Mustafa Dey, see JM to...
§ To Henry Dearborn. 9 May 1806, Department of State. “It being determined to forward to Tunis Six brass field pieces, 6 pounders, with the necessary carriages & apparatus, I have the honor to propose, that six of those in the hands of Mr. Foxall, belonging to the war Department, should be appropriated to this purpose; and that, if they can be spared, the carriages and apparatus should be...
I have been favored with yours of the 1st. instant. We have seen nothing yet which sufficiently discloses the course which the Legislature at Boston is to take. The Governors Speech is in a tone somewhat different from his Report last Winter; but what must be thought of the disposition which could thank Osgood for a Sermon, which substitutes for the evangelical spirit he professes to feel, a...
I have recd. your favor of the 7th. Tonningen being included in the Consulate of Mr. Forbes who resides at Hamburg, and being now the real commercial port of that Consulate, it would not consist with what is due to him, to comply with the wishes of Col. Russel. Mr. F. has acquitted himself as one of the most intelligent and active of the Consular Corps; and when not at Tonningen himself, is...
I have recd. your favor of the 30th. Ult: accompanied by the Discourse of one of your D. D’s. This is the most signal instance I have seen, of a prostitution of the sacred functions. If such be the religion, morality, & citizenship of the federal clergy & colleges, it is not to be wondered that the pious & patriotic people of N. England are forsaking such guides, and rallying to the Republican...
I had the pleasure of duly receiving yours of the 8th. inclosing a Copy of your son’s oration. In the hurry of the period, I have been able to give it a flying perusal only. But I do not accede to your limitation of its merits so much to an honest zeal. It has claims to a much higher character, with the addition of this laudable feature. I am just on the point of leaving Washington where I...
Congress have just passed the act adding twenty odd thousand troops to the Military establishment. It provides for two Major Generals & 5 brigadiers. The importance of placing this and the other forces in view, under the best commanders, speaks for itself. Our eyes could not but be turned, on such an occasion, to your qualifications & experience; and I wait for your permission only to name you...
I have just recd. from the Senate their concurrence (23 to 9 votes) in your nomination as a Majr. General. I give you the earliest notice, that without waiting for a formal communication, you may hasten your setting out for Washington. It is understood that your collectorship is to cease only on your being called into service, at which date your military emoluments will commence. In order to...
The last of your favors which I have to acknowlege is that of the 3d. Ult: from Boston. I am glad to see that you are again at Albany; where your presence will aid much in doing all that can be done for the reputation of the campaign. The lapse of time & the unproductiveness of the laws, contemplating a regular force, and volunteers for an entire year, under federal commissions, compel us to...
I have recd. your favor of Sepr. 30. I am glad to find that you have succeeded in producing such apprehensions at Montreal as to prevent reinforcements from that quarter to the posts above. It would have been fortunate if you could have derived such Militia & Volunteer aids from Vermont & Eastward of it, as might have substantially have [ sic ] a like controul on Prevost, and thereby have...
Your two favors of Decr have lain long without acknowledgment. For some after they came to hand I delayed it in expectation of such further information as to Gen. Smith, as would enable me to judge better of his case; and latterly I considered it as probable that I might have an opportunity, not now expected, of making that as well as other matters, subjects of conversation with you here. I...
I have recd yours of the 24. July. As my esteem and regard have undergone no change, I wish you to be apprized that such was the state of .things, and such the turn they were taking, that the retirement which is the subject of your letter, was pressed by your best personal friends. It was my purpose to have written to you on the occasion, but it was made impossible by a severe illness, from...
Yours of the 6th. came duly to hand. A letter about the same time was recd. by the Dept. of War, from Govr. Strong on the same subject. I desired Mr. Monroe to inclose you a copy of his answer, which will shew you the ground taken with the Govr. What will be his final ground with respect to the Genl. Govt. remains to be seen. In the mean time, and under the peculiarity of the Crisis, we must...
Being desirous of obtaining for the Department of War, services which I thought you could render with peculiar advantage, & hoping that for a time at least you might consent to step into that Dept. I took the liberty, without a previous communication, for which there was not time, to nominate you as successor to Mr. Monroe who was called back to the Dept. of State. I had not a doubt from all...
Whereas our Friend and acquaintance Richard Carter Junr. having a prospect of making application for the Registers office in the new Land office to be opened for the sale of the lands lying west of the Tuscaraway and between the United states Militirry tract and the Connecticut reserve, and calling on us for our approbation, These are to certyfy that to the best of our knowledg Richard Carter...
The Chevalr. de Foranda has stated in a letter to the Dept. of State, that one thousand dollars having been advanced by Don. H. Salcedo, to Lt. Pike during his late expedition, he requests that the reimbursement may be placed at his disposal. The President gives his sanction to the measure, with an intimation that it be referred to your department for execution. Will you be so obliging as to...
Not discouraged, that I did not, recieve an answer to the letter I presumed to write to you, recommending Mr Neal, as a proper person for the appointment of Surveyor of the Coast of the United States; because I have been assured it is the Course of business, at head quarters, not to reply to Such letters; therefore, presuming Still on the Strength of the Sentiment, produced by the recollection...
The House of Representatives having yesterday concluded their choice of a person for the chair of the US. and called me to that office, it now becomes necessary to provide an administration composed of persons whose qualifications and standing have possessed them of the public confidence, and whose wisdom may ensure to our fellow citizens the advantages they sanguinely expect. on a review of...
Mr. Stoddart, Secretary of the Navy having early in this month informed me by letter of his desire to resign that office, and having continued in it ever since, on my request only, I hereby authorize & appoint you to recieve the charge of the department from him, and to perform the duties of it until a Secretary of the Navy shall be formally appointed. Accept assurances of my high...
I inclose you a sheet from an anonymous letter of many sheets which I have just recieved. the letter is chiefly of the sneering kind, but among a number of gigantic measures he recommends to procure fame for myself, there is one which as it may procure public good a more legitimate object appears worthy consideration at this moment while we are about to negociate for roads through the Indian...
Colo. Smith the writer of one of the inclosed letters is the republican […] in the place of Page lately elected to Congress in Virginia. a man of very great respectability. setting that aside, our service is not so urgent as to render it necessary to drag sons from their fathers. the affection of citizens to their government is worth cultivating as it’s best support. these considerations would...
I am just making the last arrangements for my departure. the inclosed proposition of Monsr. Dupont for the purification of our Saltpetre being of some magnitude I have thought it best to forward his letter to you, that you may decide on it yourself, and give him an answer. we have nothing material from Europe except the communication from his Britannic Majesty that understanding we were...
I inclose you a letter from a mr Quarrier of this state asking a military commission. I know little of him, but that he is young, and ought to expect to be merely a commissioned officer. those who recommend him are persons of the first respectability. the abuses in the military & naval departments seem to have been so great, that it will doubtless be indispensable that we bring them in some...
I think I once before sent you an application from the same person from whom the inclosed is, with some notes on the subject of his application to me before the 4th. of March. his recollection of a promise on my word & honour , is a proof that he recollects too much with those who know me. a much greater occasion would have been requisite to draw such a pledge from me. I do not recollect the...
I inclose for your consideration a paper addressed to me from Lieutt. Landais of the Artillery, to consider & decide whether any thing & what should be done in consequence of it.—I formerly referred to your consideration the petition of John Rowe , confined in jail for having counselled or procured a souldier to desert. he was sentenced to 3. months imprisonmt. & to paiment of costs . his 3....
In my letter of the 14th. of August I inclosed you a note respecting some abuses said to have been committed in the works at Newport. tho’ I am since informed that the facts are possibly or even probably true, yet I find they were sent to me under a forged name. this may render circumspection necessary, as it certainly lessens the probability of the truth of the information. I thought it...
I have been looking into the case which is the subject of Majr. Foreman’s letter from St. Mary’s , stating that the Govr. of E. Florida proposes to enlist souldiers within our territory for an expedition against the Creeks . the statute of June 14. 1797. is only against naval enterprizes. but that of Mar. 3. 1799 regulating intercourse with the Indians, comes perfectly up to this case in...
I thank the Lord for a clear sky and bright day to hear the answer of our good Father, The President of the United States— Brother, The four Angels have directed that all the lands which have been reserved for the use of your red children, should be secured to them for their comfort so long as the sun shall shine, and this they desire may be done, by giving them separate deeds for each tract...
Strongly impressed with the sentiment that the Great Spirit is displeased with his red children for the little attention which they have paid to the preservation of their lands And having received reiterated assurances from the Government of the United States, that every injury on representation should be redressed, I beg leave to state to our good father the President, that Mr Morris in...
The Great Spirit looks down on me this day, and expects that I shall take measures to secure all the reservations to which your red children are entitled. My anxiety on this subject is encreased by a knowledge I have of the will of the Great Spirit above us all. He expects if from me, and faithfulness to him and to my red brethren compel me to be importunate in urging a completion of this very...
I thank the Lord that the day has arrived when we can settle all our business, and I thank you for the friendly manner in which it has been conducted thus far— Brother, I wish to communicate to you that our whole Nation great and small were much pleased that we were willing to come forward to our father the President, and to consult measures for the greater security and comfort of the Nation....
The guarding our arms at New London & Manchester stands on totally different ground. the former was at my request, delivered verbally to Governor Monroe about the 15th. of April 1801. certainly not a week sooner or later. the latter was in the time of the insurrection of their slaves and no more chargeable to the Union than the other expences of their militia on that occasion. I should have...
Th: Jefferson asks the favor of the Secretary of the Treasury, Secretary at War & Secretary of the Navy to carry into execution the inclosed resolution of the H. of representatives of May 3. 1802. desiring a statement of expenditures from Jan. 1. 1797. by the Quarter Master Genl. the Navy agents, for the Contingencies of the Naval & Military establishments and the Navy contracts for timber &...
I recieved yesterday your favor of the 7th. and entirely approve your proposition to remove the arms from New London . I suppose it would be generally a good rule to break up all the small deposits and carry them to the great magazines where they may be kept in order, guarded, & always ready. health & affectionate salutations. PrC ( DLC ); at foot of text: “Secretary at War.” Recorded in SJL...
Your favor of the 29th. came to hand yesterday, and I now return the papers it inclosed. I am in hopes the measures you have taken will enable Govr. Harrison to satisfy the Indians. I believe there is nothing new in the present circulation of lies among them. I have always understood that they are peculiarly inundated with lies at all times. that vice is practised pretty freely by themselves;...
Your two favors of July. 31. came to hand yesterday. I have no hesitation in approving of the purchase recommended by Genl. Sumpter, but I retain the papers a post longer to make myself acquainted with them. indeed the volume of my mail is such that subjects which require any consideration cannot be dispatched during the single evening & morning of the post’s stay. hence I shall generally on...
On further view and consideration of the papers from Genl. Sumpter, and Colo. Senf I continue of opinion that we ought to purchase the lands spoken of by them, about 4, or 500. acres, and further would approve of a purchase of any quantity within the limits of the act of assembly (2000 acres) considering that they must [be moderate in their] price as yet and that much will be wanting for...
I inclose you some more resignations of militia commissions. I think we should do well in all cases to know that a commission will be accepted, before [. . .]. We have recieved information that the emperor of Marocco, having asked passports for two vessels loaded with wheat to go to Tripoli while blockaded by us, and being refused, has ordered away our Consul: this demand of his is so palpably...
I inclose you more militia resignations, as also a petition of Benjamin Dame of Newington praying the discharge of his son under age enlisted in the army. this being a matter of right, and not of discretion in us, which he might effect by a Habeas Corpus, I hold it a duty that he be discharged. if I recollect rightly we did the same in a similar case on some former occasion. Accept assurances...
Your’s of the 7th. with the inclosed papers came to my hand only last night. I now return the papers with an entire approbation of your letter to Govr. Harrison & proceedings. the white people who are among the Indians, having designs of their own to answer, & no principle to restrain them, make great use of lies to effect their purposes, and fabricate them from time to time according to the...
Having had occasion to write more fully to mr Gallatin on the appointments for the customs in Massachusets as well as other places, I beg leave to refer you to that letter which I have asked him to communicate to you, & that you & he will decide definitively what is to be done. I therefore now reinclose the sheet of capt. Crowninsheild’s letter recieved from you. it does not contain any thing...
The inclosed letter from Govr. Tatnall and petition from the inhabitants over the Cherokee boundary, on a subject which Colo. Wafford had before presented to us , renders it necessary to advert again to it. I think we have had some information from our Commissioners of the unsuccessful endeavors they used, according to our instructions, to obtain indulgence for these settlers, but I do not...
Your favor of the 15th is recieved and I now return mr Bowdoin’s letter forwarded in it. his doctrine is unquestionably sound. I have enjoyed uninterrupted good health, the story of the five physicians notwithstanding. by this post I recieve the opinions of the Secretaries of the Treasury & navy as well as yours on the subject of our Barbary affairs. I had before asked & recieved that of the...
Your’s of the 22d. was recieved last night, and I now return the papers it inclosed. the exact statement of the boundary of cession by the Choctaws to the British is indeed important. I know not the character of Purcell [. . .] writer, but the minuteness of the details call for credit. I think the [spirit] of our former instructions is to be observed, but as they looked only generally [to] the...
I inclose for your consideration & to take order, a petition from the inhabitants of Cahokia, a letter from I. Darneille on behalf of those of Pioria, and a letter inclosing them from Govr. Harrison. the Poutawatamies have killed two Americans on their farms about 5. leagues above Cahokia; and altho’ the inhabitants of that place call it a declaration of war, yet from the amount of the aid...
I inclose you a letter recieved from Governor Strong on the subject of the military articles furnished us with the fort . considering that our predecessors may have engaged more fully than we suppose, and that in all cases where a state is urgent, the General government ought to exercise towards it the liberality & indulgence of a parent, I should be for yielding whatsoever was not too...