Search help
Documents filtered by: Recipient="Dearborn, Henry"
Results 61-70 of 210 sorted by recipient
I recieved yesterday your favor of the day before. with respect to the slanders in which the two mr Hunts were implicated, I assure you on my sacred honour that I never heard one word uttered but from mr Granger and one other person, who does not reside in this part of the country, nor is any way connected with the government; and the sole object of his communicating with me was to engage me...
My journey & two days detention on the road by high waters gave me time to reflect on our Canal at New Orleans, on which I will therefore hazard some thoughts. I think it has been said that the Misipi at low water is many feet lower, opposite N.O. than lake Pontchartrain. but the fact is impossible, being in contradiction to the laws of nature. two beds of dead water connected with the same...
I present to you mr Rives , the bearer of this, an eleve of mine in law and politics. he is able, learned, honest, & orthodox in his principles. being just about to enter on the stage of public life he wishes first to see something more of our country at large. he will be one of the distinguished men of our state , & of the United States . in taking him by the hand while in Boston you will...
About a twelvemonth after we came into the administration we learnt by a letter from mr Simpson that our predecessors had promised to the Emperor of Marocco 100. gun carriages. you have known most of the unlucky circumstances which have baffled our execution of it. the last however is but recently known. we had desired mr Simpson to have them made in Europe, or to offer the value to the...
The enclosed papers will explain to you the motives of this address—I deemed it improper to say any thing of my Accounts, while the opinion of the Court of Enquiry was unknown—This was not published before the 4th July, since which I have, with exception of three or four Days, been confined to my Room, and thus it happened I could not see you before your departure The first day I was able to...
Th: Jefferson incloses to Genl. Dearborne some papers from Lt. Osborne, a part of which he believes he before delivered to him, & sends him now the sequel, recieved yesterday to do in the case what he finds just. he had the pleasure of finding his family all restored to health. they accompanied him to Monticello where they hope in due season to recieve Genl. & Mrs Dearborne. he salutes them...
I dare say that Purcell’s map must be of value, and it would be well if his representatives would publish it. but whether worth your purchase & at what price Genl. Wilkinson might perhaps satisfy you. I shall write to Marentille that if you think it worth while to give him 50,000 D. for his project, you will inform him. in the contrary case it may be put away in your pigeon hole of projects....
A candidate for the office of Genl. Irvine is now presented of a higher order than we have before had. I do not know how far Colo. Miles may possess that mercantile fitness which the duties of the office call for, but on all other points he stands on so high ground as to overrule the charitable inclinations we might have felt for other candidates. The respectability of his character, and his...
As soon as I possibly could after my arrival here, I prepared the general instructions for our mission up the Arkansa & Red rivers, but could not make a fair copy of them in time for the last post. they are inclosed in the letter to mr Dunbar which I send open for your perusal, and then to be forwarded to him. it will enable you to see and to supply what is deficient, and to alter whatever on...
I am very much pleased to find that the Choctaws agree to sell us their country on the Missisipi, and think we ought to accept it to any extent they will agree to, only taking care the price be not too high. they are poor; and will probably sell beyond what will pay their debts, so as to be entitled to an annual pension, which is one of the best holds we can have on them. their strength & the...