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I am obliged to borrow a hand to thank you for your favour of March 11th. and for introducing to me, Mr Binon—whom I find to be a Gentleman of Sense and Letters—as well as Taste and skill—in all the fine Arts—He has been an agreeable Companion—and we have been fortunate enough to procure the best Accommodations Accommodations for him— Excuse me for I can barely write the name of your Friend,...
I received, but yesterday your Letter of the 30th of August. Convinced of the Wisdom and Sound Policy of this Measure of Government, I accept with Pleasure your Commission: and will execute it to the best of my Capacity and in as Short a time as possible. My field of Investigation is however so narrow the very little can be can be expected from, Sir your / humble Servant PHC : Charles Roberts...
In undertaking to give you an account of the Manafactories in this neighbourhood I am apprehensive, I have, engaged more than I shall be able to perform to your satisfaction. From my earliest Recollection, it has been a common observation that within two or three years, after a general Peace in Europe, American Commerce has declined to such a degree as to introduce Distress among the People...
I thank the Lord that the day has arrived when we can settle all our business, and I thank you for the friendly manner in which it has been conducted thus far— Brother, I wish to communicate to you that our whole Nation great and small were much pleased that we were willing to come forward to our father the President, and to consult measures for the greater security and comfort of the Nation....
The president of the United States of America. To Thomas Jefferson, Robert Smith, Henry Dearborne or either of them who may have the papers—hereinafter mentioned or any of them within his or their keeping or power. You are hereby commanded to appear before the Judges of the circuit court of the United States, for the fifth circuit, in the Virginia District in the city of Richmond, at the Court...
Not discouraged, that I did not, recieve an answer to the letter I presumed to write to you, recommending Mr Neal, as a proper person for the appointment of Surveyor of the Coast of the United States; because I have been assured it is the Course of business, at head quarters, not to reply to Such letters; therefore, presuming Still on the Strength of the Sentiment, produced by the recollection...
Strongly impressed with the sentiment that the Great Spirit is displeased with his red children for the little attention which they have paid to the preservation of their lands And having received reiterated assurances from the Government of the United States, that every injury on representation should be redressed, I beg leave to state to our good father the President, that Mr Morris in...
I thank the Lord for a clear sky and bright day to hear the answer of our good Father, The President of the United States— Brother, The four Angels have directed that all the lands which have been reserved for the use of your red children, should be secured to them for their comfort so long as the sun shall shine, and this they desire may be done, by giving them separate deeds for each tract...
The Great Spirit looks down on me this day, and expects that I shall take measures to secure all the reservations to which your red children are entitled. My anxiety on this subject is encreased by a knowledge I have of the will of the Great Spirit above us all. He expects if from me, and faithfulness to him and to my red brethren compel me to be importunate in urging a completion of this very...
The Delaware Tribe have determined to remove the ensuing Spring from their present habitations to Settle on the West Side of the Mississippi—Their particular destination is White River to which they Say they have been invited by the Indians of that Country. I can See no injury that will result to the United States from this removal, on the Contrary it will leave vacant a fine tract of Country...
Th: Jefferson incloses to Genl. Dearborne the draught of his message to Congress, of which he asks his careful examination & to be favored with the alterations which may occur to him on a separate paper. H. Dearborn has looked over & considered the enclosed, without observing any thing that he can consider as a difect, or requiring alteration. DLC : Papers of Thomas Jefferson.
I inclose you a charge by mr Hanson against Capt Smith & Lieutenants Davis & Dobbins of the militia, as having become members of an organized company, calling themselves the Tar-company, avowing their object to be the tarring & feathering citizens of some description. altho in ordinary cases the animadversions of the law may be properly relied on to prevent what is unlawful, yet with those...
I have left Lewis’s large map with a servt. to be carried to your office tomorrow morning. it is the 29. half sheets which contain very accurately his survey of the river & no more. mr King being with me this morning I gave them to him to be reduced to a scale of 20. miles to the inch for engraving. Mr. Pringle has declined the place of Attorney general, it is therefore now in my power to...
Your two favors of July. 31. came to hand yesterday. I have no hesitation in approving of the purchase recommended by Genl. Sumpter, but I retain the papers a post longer to make myself acquainted with them. indeed the volume of my mail is such that subjects which require any consideration cannot be dispatched during the single evening & morning of the post’s stay. hence I shall generally on...
Your’s of the 14th. came to hand yesterday. I do not see that we can avoid agreeing to estimates made by worthy men of our own choice for the sites of fortifications, or that we could leave an important place undefended because too much is asked for the site. and therefore we must pay what the sites at Boston have been valued at. at the same time I do not know on what principles of reasoning...
Your letter of Aug. 31. dated so soon after your departure gave me hopes that the sufferings at sea of mrs Dearborne and yourself, if any, had been short. I hope you will both find Lisbon a pleasant residence. I have heard so much of it’s climate that I suppose that alone will go far towards making it so; and should the want of the language of the country lessen the enjoyment of it’s society,...
The division of Louisiana into districts relating to the military as much as to the civil administration, will you be so good as to consider those proposed by Governor Harrison, and we will then consider the subject. my idea would be not to fix precisely the dividing line between the districts, as we have not information enough for that, but to use such a mode of designation for these as we do...
I inclose you more militia resignations, as also a petition of Benjamin Dame of Newington praying the discharge of his son under age enlisted in the army. this being a matter of right, and not of discretion in us, which he might effect by a Habeas Corpus, I hold it a duty that he be discharged. if I recollect rightly we did the same in a similar case on some former occasion. Accept assurances...
I inclose you information from Genl. Jackson which I presume you have otherwise recieved of an outrage committed by the Creeks. altho’ Hawkins will probably give us an account of it yet I presume you will think it necessary to make enquiries of him respecting it. as I shall leave this in 10. or 12. days for Washington, I have desired that no more letters may be forwarded from the post office...
In my letter of the 14th. of August I inclosed you a note respecting some abuses said to have been committed in the works at Newport. tho’ I am since informed that the facts are possibly or even probably true, yet I find they were sent to me under a forged name. this may render circumspection necessary, as it certainly lessens the probability of the truth of the information. I thought it...
On further view and consideration of the papers from Genl. Sumpter, and Colo. Senf I continue of opinion that we ought to purchase the lands spoken of by them, about 4, or 500. acres, and further would approve of a purchase of any quantity within the limits of the act of assembly (2000 acres) considering that they must [be moderate in their] price as yet and that much will be wanting for...
Yours of Aug. 18. is this moment recieved, & I forward you a letter of July 16. from Govr. Lewis from which you will percieve that the cloud between us, the Iowas, Foxes & Sacs is cleared up. he says nothing of the Osages; but I presume their enemies have taken advantage of the withdrawing our protection from them. should you not have issued orders for the 100,000 men, I believe it may rest...
Having had time since writing to you this day, to write the letter to mr Nicholas, & to have it copied, I inclose you the copy. PHi : Daniel Parker Papers.
Notes on the papers communicated by Genl. Dearborne Choctaws. Chickasaws} with these two nations I think our object should be to get all the country on the waters of the Missipi, leaving them those of the Mobille. with the Choctaws it would seem this could be nearly accomplished at present, as they consent to the boundary of the Big black. perhaps they could by a sufficient annuity be induced...
I never saw till lately the IX th vol. of Wilson ’s Ornithology. to this a life of the Author is prefixed, by a mr Ord , in which he has indulged himself in great personal asperity against myself. these things in common I disregard, but he has attached his libel to a book which is to go into all countries & thro’ all time. he almost makes his heroe die of chagrin at my refusing to associate...
Your favor of May 16. came duly to hand. I had before heard of the accident which had happened to you, on your return from Washington, & could the more feeling ly sympathise with your sufferings, as having some two or three years ago, experienced also the pain of a fractured arm and dislocated wrist, at a more advanced age too when these accidents are slow in recovery. your letter relieved me...
I inclose you a letter from E. I. Dupont who has established a gunpowder manufactory at Wilmington. if the public can with advantage avail themselves of his improvements in that art, it would be to encourage improvement in one of the most essential manufactures. I should be the more gratified by it as it would gratify his father who has been a faithful & useful friend to this country. during...
Your’s of the 22d. was recieved last night, and I now return the papers it inclosed. the exact statement of the boundary of cession by the Choctaws to the British is indeed important. I know not the character of Purcell [. . .] writer, but the minuteness of the details call for credit. I think the [spirit] of our former instructions is to be observed, but as they looked only generally [to] the...
I inclose for your consideration several applications for military commissions. the recommendations of Doctr. Macaulay are very strong. he called on me, and one cannot help being influenced somewhat by the appearance of a man. he is quite a well looking subject, but not too much so for a Captain . altho’ a majority is mentioned, I presume less will be accepted. There is no man in South...
Your favor of the 15th is recieved and I now return mr Bowdoin’s letter forwarded in it. his doctrine is unquestionably sound. I have enjoyed uninterrupted good health, the story of the five physicians notwithstanding. by this post I recieve the opinions of the Secretaries of the Treasury & navy as well as yours on the subject of our Barbary affairs. I had before asked & recieved that of the...