Search help
Documents filtered by: Recipient="Dearborn, Henry"
Results 31-60 of 210 sorted by date (ascending)
Your favor of the 8th. was recieved yesterday. I cannot [but consider?] the case of the French negroes at New York as substantially within the police of the state: and that [cases] of that kind will not be as well provided against by the General government as by the government of the place. our relations with it are only incidental, to wit, as it comes within the laws of contraband or...
The permission of the Emperor of Marocco to our Consul to remain for six months for the purpose of explanations, which is their way of declaring a state of peace having materially changed the state of things in the Mediterranean, I had recommended to mr Smith to stop the sailing of the John Adams. I now recieve a letter from him pressing her sailing. I had thought the thing so obvious as not...
Your favor of the 20th. is recieved. on consultation with mr Madison who came here the day after mine of the 17th. to you, he appeared so clearly to concur with mr Smith in sending the John Adams, towards which the present state of her preparation had considerable influence, that I thought it better to conclude on her departure, and so wrote to mr Smith by the post of the 20th. I had intended...
In the case of Crutchelow & John Williams , two of the murderers of the Indians who have fled, had the case happened in any of the states which proceed according to the forms of the English law, an indictment would be preferred to a grand jury, the witnesses called to appear, and on it’s being found a true bill, a capias issues, which being returned non est inventus, an Exigent goes out, on...
Hints on the subject of Indian boundaries, suggested for consideration An object, becoming now of great importance, is the establishment of a strong front on our Western boundary, the Missisipi, securing us on that side, as our front on the Atlantic does towards the East. our proceedings with the Indians should tend systematically to that object, leaving the extinguishment of title in the...
Th: Jefferson asks a consultation with the heads of departments tomorrow at 11. aclock, on the subject of N. Orleans & the Floridas. should we meet later, we may be prevented by the visits usual on the day.   will mr Smith be so good as to send the inclosed over the way to mr Lincoln? RC ( MHi : Levi Lincoln Papers); undated or date clipped; endorsed by Levi Lincoln as 31 Dec. 1802; with...
Observations on mr Hawkins’s letter of Dec. 22. 1802. Our proceedings on the subject of the deed by the Speaker of the Creeks to mrs Darant should be decisive, prompt and exemplary. if she be an Indian (which I should not expect as she is the sister of Mc.Gillivray) we cannot punish her. if she be an American citizen, the Attorney of the US. in the Missisipi territory might be instructed to...
The inclosed were sent to me by mr Bacon with permission to keep them. they may therefore be filed in the War office. as we percieve that a light French breeze has already reached most of the Indians, it will be well for us to keep our eye on all their movements. I have therefore asked the favor of mr Bacon to continue to send me this correspondence. as I have no doubt the arrival of the...
Th: Jefferson [presents] his friendly the Secretary at War and sends him the Governors Page in his office. PrC ( DLC ); faint. Recorded in SJL with notation “lres from Govr Page & Saquiricia.” Enclosures: (1) John Page to TJ, 2 Mch. 1803 . (2) “Saquiricia” to TJ, 15 Feb. 1803 (recorded in SJL as received from Windsor, North Carolina, on 16 Mch. with notation “W,” but not found). (3) probably...
I am much pleased with both the ideas suggested by Lyons , viz. 1. to proceed from Knoxville direct through the Cherokee Creek & Choctaw country to Natchez. 2. to encourage individuals to make terms with the Indians on their private account for establishing farms along the line at every 15. or 30. or 45. miles distance as can be obtained.   but instead of going from Knoxville to Natchez in a...
The dangers on the road to Natchez are really serious, & calling for attention. mere stationary posts, as proposed by Govr. Roan, appear to me inefficient. either a small body of cavalry, or mounted infantry, to be perpetually scouring the road and hovering about the caravans of passengers, as a marechaussée, seems worthy of consideration, as also the employing Indians in the same way, or...
I inclose you a letter from E. I. Dupont who has established a gunpowder manufactory at Wilmington. if the public can with advantage avail themselves of his improvements in that art, it would be to encourage improvement in one of the most essential manufactures. I should be the more gratified by it as it would gratify his father who has been a faithful & useful friend to this country. during...
It is suggested to me (indirectly from the person himself) that Jerome Bonaparte is at Baltimore under the name of Monsr. Dalbarton , with a son of Rewbell, and that they mean to ask a passage to France in one of our frigates. if this be the fact, he will have satisfied thereof the minister of his nation, thro’ whom we shall be apprised of it, and relieved from all trouble in deciding on it....
I inclose you a petition from Aaron Goff of Vermont praying the release of his son under age. the fact of infancy being established, the discharge becomes a matter of right.   I have the pleasure to inform you that William Clarke accepts with great glee the office of going with Capt Lewis up the Missouri.   in the moment of my departure from Washington mrs Madison informed me you had a thought...
I inclose you a letter from mr Jackson of Tennissee, formerly a Senator from that state on the subject of Colo. Butler. he is a man of great integrity and respectability; carried sometimes beyond strict reason by an overwarm and excellent heart. another from judge Campbell on the subject of Doctr. Vandyke. I also return the one from him to you covering mine. on the subject of the robbery...
About a twelvemonth after we came into the administration we learnt by a letter from mr Simpson that our predecessors had promised to the Emperor of Marocco 100. gun carriages. you have known most of the unlucky circumstances which have baffled our execution of it. the last however is but recently known. we had desired mr Simpson to have them made in Europe, or to offer the value to the...
I now return you the proceedings of the courtmartial held at Fort Jay with an approbation of the sentence against Lt. Van Renslaer, & a remission of the corporal punishment of Ferguson & Rush as you advised.   I am sensible of the risque we run in returning to Washington before the commencement of the [frost?] but the collection & copying of documents & other preparations for the meeting of...
Will General Dearborne be so good as to recommend some person? or will it be better for him to retain the papers & consult the republican members from Maine ? [ Note by TJ :] Dudley Broadstreet Hobart of Gardener recommended by Genl. Dearborne, who candidly states that he is his son in law, but the applicn is from many respectable persons of the neighborhood, & the only competiton is a young...
I am very much pleased to find that the Choctaws agree to sell us their country on the Missisipi, and think we ought to accept it to any extent they will agree to, only taking care the price be not too high. they are poor; and will probably sell beyond what will pay their debts, so as to be entitled to an annual pension, which is one of the best holds we can have on them. their strength & the...
It is represented to me on the part of a person of the name of Solomon Sessum living at Tarburgh in N. Caroline, in independant circumstances, but himself & wife both old, that Roderick Sessums their son was, in the year 1795, during a fit of intoxication, enlisted by a Captn. Rickard then recruiting in that quarter. that being at Natchez in 1800, when his time was to expire, the father with...
Considering that we have shortly to ask a favour ourselves from the Creeks, the Tuckabatché road, may we not turn the application of Hawkins to our advantage, by making it the occasion of broaching that subject to them? he might be directed to say to them that we furnish with pleasure the several articles which he has asked for their use: that there is nothing we have more at heart than to...
Th: Jefferson with his friendly compliments to Genl Dearborne returns him Govr. Mc.kean’s letter; to whom he may say for the Govr’s satisfaction that the letter had been communicated to Th:J. who said that some vague intimation of the purport mentd in the letter had been formerly dropped to him, but it was so little noted that neither the person, nor manner can now be recollected: that...
Altho’ the communication of the within to me might be considered as confidential, yet it is so important that Wilkerson’s maneuvres should be understood that I send it for your perusal, in confidence also. he is turning on us the batteries of our friends in aid of his own. the business of the Commission terminated on the 16th. of Jan. when the order for the upper posts was given, as that...
Some compliment being proper for the militia of Tennissee who went to Natchez under the command of Colo. George Dogherty may not something like the following be said on the part of the President in a letter from the Secretary at war to Colo. Dogherty or to the Governor of Tennissee? ‘the President has seen with great satisfaction the willingness with which the militia under your command [or...
On the vacating of Judge Pickering’s office I shall be obliged to nominate another before the rising of the Senate. J. Langdon has recommended Sherburne . a much more powerful representation is made against him and in favr. of Jonathan Steele. tho’ it is probable the witnesses attending the impeachment from that state may have been prepared to give particular opinions, yet perhaps in a free...
Will you be so good as to consider & direct how the 3000. D. may be apportioned in the details of the Arcansa expedition ? to wit how much for pay, for instruments & other articles of outfit which cannot be furnished from the military fund, & how much may be laid out in light articles for barter & presents to the Indians. this last article should be made as large as the fund will admit....
Just as I was leaving Washington, I received the inclosed letter from Colo Matthew Lyon , the suggestions of which I think well worthy our attention, as it is certainly better to prevent Squatters on the lands in the district of Louisiana (as yet it is upper Louisiana) than to have them removed after they shall have firmly established themselves. at present the Spanish laws are in force there....
As soon as I possibly could after my arrival here, I prepared the general instructions for our mission up the Arkansa & Red rivers, but could not make a fair copy of them in time for the last post. they are inclosed in the letter to mr Dunbar which I send open for your perusal, and then to be forwarded to him. it will enable you to see and to supply what is deficient, and to alter whatever on...
I recieved yesterday your favor of the 12th. the duties proposed to be levied on us by the Spanish Government at Mobille, require certainly very serious attention. their bearings on what we had determined to do at Baton rouge, must come into consideration at the same time. the want of papers here to remind me exactly of the regulations we had established, and the distressing situation of my...
I inclose you a letter from Capt Barron at Westpoint, on which be pleased to do what you think right. The object of the kind enquiries in your letter of the 19th. is no more. she left us on the day of the date of my last letter to you. this event will occasion my stay here to be about a week longer than I had originally intended. I suppose it will still be a fortnight before I shall be with...