Search help
Documents filtered by: Recipient="Cranch, Mary Smith"
Results 1-50 of 224 sorted by relevance
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
How are you to day? have you heard from weymouth? I send you a Barrel of pears and a Barrel of Russet Apples. if you have them put under your corn House untill the weather freezes they will keep better I also ask your acceptance of a Barrel of Rye flower—I hope I Shall be able to See you tomorrow: I am taking calomil to day—I Send the Linnen and my two Trunks which you have always been So kind...
I have but a moments time to write you a Line, and send you by Mr. Allen the measure of Charles and Thomas Shirts. If you make them 2 now, each, it will be sufficient. I have indeed been made happy by receiving 2 Letters from my Sister, but we have none from my Cousin Nabby. I really commiserate her Situation—look round on every side, and infelicity must be her present portion. I suppose...
I received a few lines from you yesterday, in replie to mr Bates queries. I would have the Room above finishd off the Same Size with the lower Room, the North Clossets to remain in the Room and Chamber, the Stairs to be one flight, a portico with a flat Top which I would have leaded, and a Similar one built over the front door of the House, the two trees cut down, but I do not wish to have the...
It is a great grief to me my dear sister that I can do So little for you in your trouble when I owe So much to you. beside being much of an invalid myself Jackson is very Sick keeps his Bed—and a thousand cares devolve upon me in concequence of the Sudden determination very reluctantly enterd into from a sense at this late period, without any previous arrangment. but all this is Small in...
we left philadelphia on Wednesday last. the day preceeding was very Hot a partial rain had waterd the Roads for 15 or 20 miles So as to render the first part of our journey pleasent. we were overtaken by showers and detained by them, but on thursday we found clouds of dust for want of Rain. troops and calvacades did not lessen it, and the Heat was intolerably oppressive, So much so as to...
Mr Lincoln our Carpenter came this morning from Weymouth he saw mrs Humphries who watchd last night with Mrs Norten. She Said that mrs Norten was a little revived this morning I hope with trembling—may we be enabled to say Gods will be done for herself we need feel no anxiety. She will be relieved from her Earthly duties which Seem too great for her feeble Frame frame but for her Friends and...
Inclosed is a Letter for the Doctor as the contents are valuable you will be so kind as to deliver it yourself, and give me notice that you have received it and done so by the first post I Shall want to hear very often from you and to know how our affairs progress. I am most anxious about the painting and having the Rooms of the old House in order. Mrs Porter must have help. She will have Such...
I expected to have heard from you on Saturday, but no Letter came and on Wedensday but Still no Letter. I was dissapointed, but knowing your many avocations I concluded it must arise from thence. I hope not from Sickness tho you wrote me you was not well. I who have more leisure and no care of Family affairs but my orders can and do devote almost every morning in writing to Some Friend or...
Death, thou art no Respecter of persons; Washington is no more! a Great Man has fallen, and his End is peace, I shall dye said he, but death has no terrors for me; this Melancholy Event, was this day brought to this city by the mail and by private Letters; the Croup was the rapid disease which put a period to the days, of him whose, memory will I trust be Embalmed in the Hearts of all true...
I received your Letter yesterday. I know from what I saw and heard whilst I was at home that there was pains taken to make mr & mrs Porter uneasy, and that they were too apt to listen to Stories which were in themselves Idle, and arrised from Envy. many would be glad to get into their hands Such a charge as is left with mr & mrs. Porter, who would not be so honest in their care and attention...
Excuse my intrudeing upon you a moment with a recital of a line from your Niece, Who is authorised from the feelings of her own heart And from a desire of her Aunts to gratify a request which she anxiously solicited me to comply with, I cannot object to the request altho it is a painful one, to informe you how extreemly sick my Aunt has been, I fear you have been anxiously distressed to hear...
I write you a few lines to day, but the weather is so Hot and close and the flies so tormenting that I can not have any comfort. The mornings instead of being pleasent as with you, are Stagnant. Not a leaf Stirs till nine or ten oclock. I get up & drop into my chair; without Spirits or vigor, breath a Sigh for Quincy, and regret that necessity obliges us to remain here. It grows Sickly. the...
I think you have been exercised in deeds of Charity to that poor forlorn Man who would once have said, is thy Servant a dog, that he should become a living prey to worms, or what is worse? He is a most striking instance of Indolence, and having no stimulous to action! none of those tender endearing ties of wife, child, Sister, or Brother. Indolence Created first an apathy, and apathy crept on...
I did not write to you the last week. I supposed you must be much occupied by the ordination which I hope is happily over and that I may congratulate you as well as myself upon again having a setled pastor, in whose society I promise myself much pleasure please god to continue my Life— I cannot entertain you with any thing new. I have the pleasure of mrs Cushings company frequently. She will...
I got to Westown on Wednesday by four oclock and was met two miles from Town by mrs Otis, accompanied by mrs Marshall who insisted upon my putting up with them I accordingly went, and was very kindly and hospitably receivd by the Col and his Family. the old Gentleman who is now more than 80 years, still retains much of the fire and sprightlyness of youth. he is very infirm in health, but...
It is a long time since I have written to you, & so many things have intervened, that I know not what to select that may be interesting The burning of our Academy has been an affair of the greatest importance to us, & occasioned a good deal of work, & confusion in our family, for we, at that time had fourteen Boarders, & between seventy & eighty Students, who were flocking to the house, who...
Abby was indeed very happy to receive a letter from so worthy, beloved, & good an Aunt—& it gives me sincere pleasure to find you were able to take your pen in hand, & convey Instruction & entertainment to your Friend—The long turn of cold weather has been very unfavourable for retiring into a chamber, for any literary pursuit, even at the other end of the room the Ink would freeze The only...
Yesterday mr Johnson and his Mamma arrived here in good Health. by her I heard from mr & mrs Cranch. She poor thing has had a mishap. I rather think it good than ill luck however for it is sad Slavery to have children as fast as she has. She has recoverd tho she is thin & weak. Your son is rising Rising in his own estimation, which was the place where he most wanted it. he plead a cause, spoke...
I have been expecting to get a Letter from you for Several days: I am the more anxious to hear from you as you wrote me in your last, that mr Cranch had got one of his bad Colds. I intended to have left this city to day, but the president having determined to visit Washington I could not think of taking the Coachman who has experience of his horses and is a sober good man. tho the president...
The extreem heat of yesterday & the no less prospect of it this day, is beyond any thing I ever experienced in my Life. The Glasses were at 90 in the Shade Yesterday. tomorrow will be the 4 July, when if possible I must see thousands. I know not how it will be possible to get through. live here I cannot an other week unless a Change takes place in the weather. You had as good be in an oven the...
I know my much loved Sister that you will mingle in my sorrow, and weep with me over the Grave of a poor unhappy child who cannot now add an other pang to those which have peirced my Heart for Several years past; cut off in the midst of his days, his years are numberd and finished; I hope my Supplications to heaven for him, that he might find mercy from his maker, may not have been in vain....
I thank you for so kindly giving me information of our dear Sisters recovery. It has releived me from that heaviness & anguish, with which our hearts are oppressed, when we know we have any of our near & dear connections distressed with diseases either of body or mind—Your letter written the seventh of October had a speedy conveyance, & I could not but rejoice in the fineness of this day, as I...
I write you a few lines by mr Black altho I know the post will go quicker. I hope to get Letters to day from Quincy, now a week since I heard. we are thank God all well. the President is most worn down I tell the Gentlemen if they do not give him a respit Soon it will be too much for him—the Numurous addresses which pour in daily in abundance give him much additional writing. They are however...
I reachd this place yesterday morning and found Mrs Smith and Caroline very well. Mrs Adams and her two little Girls have been here three weeks. N York still distressd with the fever, tho many of the inhabitants have returned to the city, yet several of them have fallen since, and from the return of so many persons, new cases have been increased. I found a Letter from the President who writes,...
I received your kind Letter of Janry and intended writing you yesterday, but I know not how it is, I have less time for writing than formerly. I believe it is partly oweing to my not being able to improve the Morning as I used to. When I can sleep I indulge myself more, as it is not light enough to See to write till after Seven oclock. Our Weather is too warm. we shall have a Sickly Spring....
I suppose the reason why I have not had a Letter from you for a long time, arrises from your expectation that I am upon my Journey; the Roads have been represented to me as so intolerable bad, and I know them to be so, that I have been prevaild upon to remain longer than I designd. I now think I shall stay untill after the 13th of Feby, the great important day which may in its concequences...
I write you this morning just to say that there are dispatches from our Envoys up to April by which it appears that they have had Several conferences with Tallyrand, the Subject of which was obtaining Money—They are just decypherd and will be communicated. no Reception from the Directory, no like to be any. I can not but Say to you, what will Strike every one, that every hour they remain in...
You will forgive me my Dear sister that I spaired both you and my Self the pain of a formal leave, and that I left you without bidding you an adieu. I never was so divided between Duty, and affection. the desire I had to remain with you, and the necessity I was under to commence a long and tedious journey at this late Season of the Year—my Heart was rent with the distrest Situation of yourself...
I have only time this morning to write you a line, to inclose a Letter from mrs Brisler to her Sister. it is company day New Hampshire Conneticut & Massachusetts delegation dine with us to day: I am sure we have never had half so many Congress Ladies since I first came here. they do not expect any accommodations at the new city for them, and they seem determined to take their turn now We have...
By mrs Otis who leaves here this week I send a waistcoat pattern for William Shaw which I designd Should have reachd him before commencment. I Send it to you because I presume he will be at Quincy. if you will get it made for him you may charge it to me. the Stripes should go round the body. I have put some linning in. The Waistcoat should be linned throughout. I hope he will be attentive to...
I arrived in this City last Evening & came to the old House now occupied by Francis as an Hotel. Tho the furniture and arrangment of the House is changed I feel more at home here than I should any where else in the city, and when Sitting with my son & other friends who call to see me, I can scarc e ly persuade myself, that tomorrow I must quit it, for an unknown and an unseen abode. My Journey...
I have the pleasure to inform you of my safely being lodged in our Haverhill Dwelling, last Friday night, and found all in good Health. Billy was sadly dissappointed in not finding his Sister. “When Mamma will Aunt Cranch bring little dear Sister home?” The Box of turtles you sent him, though greatly pleased with them, would hardly make up for the loss of her. Alas! my Sister this will be a...
After I had closed my Letter yesterday, I received yours of the 28th. The Garden Seeds are in a small wooden Box in the garret Chamber over the best Chamber; made for the purpose of securing them from the mice; the Box is locked and mrs Porter has the key, tho She may have forgotten it. It is a long Box unpainted I Should like much to have a passage to the kitchin from the entry; my intention...
I just write you a line to day, to tell you we are well and to inclose Letters from my Family. We have not any thing new Since I wrote you last, except a fine rain, which is truly a blessing for the Grass and Grain were in a suffering condition and the dust so intollerable as to render riding very dissagreable. I am to drink tea on Board the Frigate United States this afternoon if the weather...
I have written to you my dear Sister twice since my arrival here. I know not but one of the Letters was in the lost mail I miss your pen which used to detail to me both public and private affairs. I have reason to bless God, that your Life is spared to your family, and Friends. I hope you will not be induced by any means to over exert yourself, or try your Strength beyond its bearing; a...
Tomorow morning I expect to leave this place, and proceed on my way to Philadelphia—where I hope soon to hear from you. Frank and family had arived before Brisler. They had only ten days passage. our Envoys I presume are ready to sail. The P writes me that he hopes they are gone that there may no longer be room for impertinent paragraphs fabricated by busy bodies who are forever meddling with...
I have just sent some Letters to go by Captain Folger, but find he does not sail so soon as captain Cushing. Should he arrive before Folger without a Line I know by experience how fruitfull your imaginition would be of conjectures, and tho I have said all that appeard to me of importance, & perhaps more than others will think of any, in my Letters on Board Folger, I forgot to inclose a paper...
As captain Folger is not yet gone I write a few more lines by him, tho I have nothing new to acquaint you with, only that two days ago my little darling was inoculated for the Small pox. if whenever you come to have Grandchildren, you will scarcly know any difference between them & your own children, particularly if you should be under the same roof with them; I have got mr Jenks to take the...
Having at length recover’d from the fatigue of a very unpleasant journey I take the liberty my dear Aunt of writing to solicit the favour of your correspondence although I know your avocations to be so numerous I almost fear to trespass upon your time— It was with the greatest regret I found myself obliged to leave Boston without seeing you as I wished much to converse with you concerning John...
I recieved your very kind Letter for which I return many thanks I hope you will pardon the anxiety which my last expressed concerning my darling John who is I am well aware safer with you than with me but the continual apprehension his father and I suffer’d when he visited us last Summer induced me to write so particularly. We are sincerely thankful for your kindness to our Children and I...
Mr. Thaxter will want a horse in a short time, to go a journey, and I should be glad, if mine is not wanted, that Charles should come with him; as he desires to. He will then be of some service and of no expense; if Uncle Tufts thinks proper, Charles can ride the horse here, when he comes. But if he does not think it for the best, will you favour me with a Line that I may inform Mr. Thaxter....
I heard to Day that the Doctor had a Letter from Mr. Cranch, and that he was still very Ill, poor Man. I am grieved for him, and for you my dear Sister, who I know share with him in all his troubles. It seem s worse to me when I hear you are unwell now than it used to, when I could go and see you. Tis a hard thing to be weaned from any thing we Love, time nor distance has not yet had that...
I was yesterday at Weymouth where I received your Letter, and the saffron risbands &c. I thank you and Cousin Betsy both; I expect you a thursday, but from all I can find out, I do not think the visit will be to any purpose; there seems to me to be at present a real aversion to change of state. having quited one has no inclination for an other; so things look to me. I am really sorry upon all...
If the Compass by which my course is directed does not vary again through unavoidable necessity I shall sit out for Quincy next week. we shall probably be 12 days in comeing. I shall want some preparation at Home. I will write to you from N york. Betsy wrote to her Mother to know if her sister Nancy was at home & that I should want her during my stay at Quincy The Hot weather of july has...
on the 17 of this Month cousin William wrote his uncle, that he had carried his cousin Tom Home to Braintree with the Symptoms of the Measles upon him; you will easily Suppose that I waited for the next post with great anxiety but how was I dissapointed last Evening when mr Adams returnd from Town, and the Roads being very bad the post had not arrived. I could not content myself without...
I have received but one Letter from you Since I left Quincy now near a Month; I have been here three weeks, except 3 days which I past at my sons in N york— next Monday I leave here for Philadelphia where it is thought we may now go with safety— I was in hopes to have taken Mrs smith with me, but her situation is difficult not having received any advise what to do, and She is loth to go for...
We leave this place this morning & hope to reach Home on fryday of the next week. I have written to mr smith to procure sundry articles for me in Boston which will require a Team to bring them to Quincy, & bags for oats will you be so good as to consult with mr Porter, and if mr Belcher can go to Town for them So as to get them up before we arrive I should be very glad. will you be so kind as...
I arrived here last Night. my first inquiry was for a Letter from you, which I was happy enough to find, and great relief did it afford to my anxious mind. I sent to the post office to see if I could get any further intelligence last evening but was dissapointed. I am ready however to attribute it more to your not getting an opportunity of conveyance than to any unfavourable circumstance, and...
We left Philadelphia on Wedensday last, the day preceeding was very Hot a partial Rain had waterd the Roads for 15 or 20 miles So as to render the first part of our journey pleasent, we were overtaken by showers—and detaind by them, but on thursday we found clouds of dust for want of Rain, troops and calvacades did not lessen it, and the Heat was intolerably oppressive, so much so as to nearly...
I inclose a pamphlet upon darying which when you have read, be so good as to give to Pheby provided she becomes my dairy woman, and be so good as to procure me the following List of Herbs & send me in small Bags Catnip mint penny Royal & Hysop. You will laugh I suppose, but I want them for my Voyage, & what I get here are good for very little. Catnip is an herb I never could find here. I have...