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Justice & judgment are the habitation of thy throne, O my God! but thy mercy endureth forever— In the depths of Sorrow, I have lifted up mine Eyes, & felt some ray of comfort, when I saw this thy darling Attribute shining with distinguished lustre—“many, very many were the virtues of my Friend”— feign would I hope, they were such as would more than ballance his failings— feign would I hope...
I believe in one of my Letters I told you I had troubles of various kinds— I need to be possessed of more wisdom than the Serpent, joined to the innocence of the Dove, more meekness than Moses, more patience than Job—& to abound richly in the fruits of the Spirit— In one word our people have been very Jealous of me, they were conscious they had not used Mr Shaw well, & thought it imposible for...
If I had received your Letter an hour sooner, I could have sent you an answer the same day, viz. Thursday, by Mr. Badcock who dined here, and would conveyed it as far as Milton Bridge himself. But having lost this Opportunity, I must send by the Post. But since you have signified your Request to Mr. Shaw only mediately, he thinks himself entitled to make use of the same Medium in giving an...
You my beloved Sisters, whose time is ever filled , with the various duties of Life, can more readily pardon me, for not sooner acquainting you how, & when I got home—Leaving a large family only for a few weeks, makes domestic Cares press hard, & my Boarders Cloatths got very much out of repair, in my absence, & the cold season, & thanksgiving advancing, made new, highly necessary, so that no...
I have not written to you since I receivd your Letter giving me an Account of the ordination, the fatigues of which I should have been glad to have shared with you, and I could not but blame myself, that I did not write to request mrs Porter to have opend our House, and Stables, and to have accomodated as many persons as they could. It is now happily over and I congratulate the Town in having...
your kind Letter of Jan’ ry 14 th I received last week. I Shall not be dissatisfied with mr Whitney if the people are disposed to give him a call, but far otherways, I shall rejoice in the prospect of having so Virtuous and sensible a Gentleman Setled with us, to whom I doubt not, years will teach more knowledge of the world I can understand you well tho you do not speak plain. I know you...
I have but a moments time to write you a Line, and send you by Mr. Allen the measure of Charles and Thomas Shirts. If you make them 2 now, each, it will be sufficient. I have indeed been made happy by receiving 2 Letters from my Sister, but we have none from my Cousin Nabby. I really commiserate her Situation—look round on every side, and infelicity must be her present portion. I suppose...
I congratulate you and my dear Neice upon the late happy event in your Family. can you really believe that you are a Grandmamma? does not the little fellow feel as if he was really your own. if he does not now, by that time you have lived a year with him, or near you, I question if you will be able to feel a difference. have you been so much occupied by these New cares as not to be able to...
Mrs Hay call’d upon me a sunday whilst I was gone to meeting to let me know that She expected to Sail in a few days for Newyork. When I saw her before she determined to go out in captain Lyde who will not go till the middle of April, but Captain Cooper is a British Bottom, and on board of him they will not have algerines to fear. I cannot but think She is right. I freely own I should be loth...
I know you will rejoice to hear that we are so far on our journey without meeting any accident my Quincy Friends and Neighbours who accompanied us as far as Westown could tell you that they parted with us in as good Spirits, as the peculiar circumstances which preceeded our leaving home would admit. we reachd Williams’s and lodgd there. it was fortunate that mr Brisler was with his wife, for...
I have been 16 days at sea, and have not attempted to write a single Letter; tis true I have kept a journal when ever I was able, but that must be close locked up; unless I was sure to hand it you with safety. Tis said of Cato the Roman censor, that one of the 3 things which he regreted during his Life, was going once by sea when he might have made his journey by land; I fancy the philosopher...
I wrote you by Captain Dashood just when I was about removeing from the Bath Hotel to Grovsnor Square, since which I have had a buisy time getting my House in order and procuring a thousand little necessaries for different countries have different fashions and what suits in one will not answer in an other. For instanc my kitchen furniture was made for a hearth fire none of which could be used...
Your Letter by way of Amsterdam had a quick passage and was matter of great pleasure to me. I thank you for all your kind and Friendly communications, by which you carry my imagination back to my Friends and acquaintance; who were never dearer to me than they now are, tho distanced so far from them. I have really commiserated the unhappy Refugees more than ever, and think no severer punishment...
I received a few lines from you yesterday, in replie to mr Bates queries. I would have the Room above finishd off the Same Size with the lower Room, the North Clossets to remain in the Room and Chamber, the Stairs to be one flight, a portico with a flat Top which I would have leaded, and a Similar one built over the front door of the House, the two trees cut down, but I do not wish to have the...
It is a great grief to me my dear sister that I can do So little for you in your trouble when I owe So much to you. beside being much of an invalid myself Jackson is very Sick keeps his Bed—and a thousand cares devolve upon me in concequence of the Sudden determination very reluctantly enterd into from a sense at this late period, without any previous arrangment. but all this is Small in...
What no Letters from Quincy has been repeated every day for a week upon the return of every messenger from the post office. I was hunting up my pen this morning & going to sit down and inquire whether my dear sister was sick when yours of May 10th was brought me. you can hardly judge how impatient I feel if I do not hear once a week, but have you not received a Letter from me inclosing a Bill...
I wrote to you upon my journey whilst I was at Brookfield the sunday after I left you and was sorry to find by your Letter, that you had not received it. I wrote to you from N york but have been so engaged in moveing, & so embarressd with company in the midst of it, tho only a complimentary call, that I have had scarcly a moment that I could call my own. it was kind in you [to l]et mr Cranch...
we left philadelphia on Wednesday last. the day preceeding was very Hot a partial rain had waterd the Roads for 15 or 20 miles So as to render the first part of our journey pleasent. we were overtaken by showers and detained by them, but on thursday we found clouds of dust for want of Rain. troops and calvacades did not lessen it, and the Heat was intolerably oppressive, So much so as to...
Your kind Letter reachd me on the 20th. I began to feel very impatient to hear from you; your Letter afforded me much pleasure; I rejoice that so worthy and amiable a man as mr Kendall allways appeard to me, is like to be so soon, and agreably setled. I would willingly exchange all the discourses I have heard here since I came and all I shall be like to hear, for the one half which e’en chance...
I wrote you a Letter last week, but as it did not get to the Post office, I have detaind it with an intention of sending you one of a later date. I believe I have received all your Letters. your last was dated Sep br 8th I have not written to any of my Friends so often as I ought to. you know very well that when a person is fixed to any particular spot, that very few subjects worth...
I was very anxious to receive a Letter from you this morning, and Betsy was wishing yet dreading to hear from her sister. that she yet lives, is some hope for to build upon. mr Brisler has just brought your Letter from the office dated 29 th Jan’ ry I believe I have written you every week, but fancy the Ice may have prevented the post from arriving. I wish Polly was where you could often see...
I intended to have acknowled g ed the receipt of your Letter before this time, but our Scholars all study in our room, in the day, & in the Evening, Gilman reads History to Mr Cogswell whose Eyes are weak, & there seems to be so much to do, that I have scarcely a moments leisure—Abby’s being so sick all winter, prevented my doing any thing, to get forward in buisness. But thanks to a kind...
Mr Lincoln our Carpenter came this morning from Weymouth he saw mrs Humphries who watchd last night with Mrs Norten. She Said that mrs Norten was a little revived this morning I hope with trembling—may we be enabled to say Gods will be done for herself we need feel no anxiety. She will be relieved from her Earthly duties which Seem too great for her feeble Frame frame but for her Friends and...
I have just returnd from a visit to Moor Place Moor feilds, Where I have been to take leave of my much esteemed Friends, mr and Mrs Rogers, who set out on wedensday for France, and from thence are to sail in the April Packet for Newyork. Mr Rogers thinks it most for his benifit, and those connected with him, to quit England, and endeavour to adjust his affairs himself in America. She...
I have just sent some Letters to go by Captain Folger, but find he does not sail so soon as captain Cushing. Should he arrive before Folger without a Line I know by experience how fruitfull your imaginition would be of conjectures, and tho I have said all that appeard to me of importance, & perhaps more than others will think of any, in my Letters on Board Folger, I forgot to inclose a paper...
As captain Folger is not yet gone I write a few more lines by him, tho I have nothing new to acquaint you with, only that two days ago my little darling was inoculated for the Small pox. if whenever you come to have Grandchildren, you will scarcly know any difference between them & your own children, particularly if you should be under the same roof with them; I have got mr Jenks to take the...
I have been exceedingly grieved at hearing of our dear Sister Adams’s Illness— She was so well in the winter, that I hoped she would have escaped any inconvenience from the return of the fever & ague— When it gets such fast hold of a Constitution, it appears to be a very formidable Disorder, & is attended with very disagreeable Consequences— I have heard she was growing better, & hope by this...
My Mamma has desired me, My dear Aunt, to give a Copy of a few cursory minutes, that I took at Chantilly of the Prince de Condé’s Seat there. They are very incorrect and confused, but I dont love to make apologies, and will therefore give them such as they are, and trust for the rest in your Candour. Chantilly is the seat of the Prince de Condé, and is perhaps the most magnificent, and most...
Inclosed is a Letter for the Doctor as the contents are valuable you will be so kind as to deliver it yourself, and give me notice that you have received it and done so by the first post I Shall want to hear very often from you and to know how our affairs progress. I am most anxious about the painting and having the Rooms of the old House in order. Mrs Porter must have help. She will have Such...
Mrs Smith Louisa mrs otis Rush Peters and a number of young Ladies are just gone to Congress to hear the Speech which is deliverd at 12 oclock to day; I should have liked well enough to have been of the party, but it would not have been proper—you will see it, as soon as you will get the Letter I presume Some people will not be pleased, I Suppose because it will not disclose enough about the...