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Mr Lincoln our Carpenter came this morning from Weymouth he saw mrs Humphries who watchd last night with Mrs Norten. She Said that mrs Norten was a little revived this morning I hope with trembling—may we be enabled to say Gods will be done for herself we need feel no anxiety. She will be relieved from her Earthly duties which Seem too great for her feeble Frame frame but for her Friends and...
It is a great grief to me my dear sister that I can do So little for you in your trouble when I owe So much to you. beside being much of an invalid myself Jackson is very Sick keeps his Bed—and a thousand cares devolve upon me in concequence of the Sudden determination very reluctantly enterd into from a sense at this late period, without any previous arrangment. but all this is Small in...
How are you to day? have you heard from weymouth? I send you a Barrel of pears and a Barrel of Russet Apples. if you have them put under your corn House untill the weather freezes they will keep better I also ask your acceptance of a Barrel of Rye flower—I hope I Shall be able to See you tomorrow: I am taking calomil to day—I Send the Linnen and my two Trunks which you have always been So kind...
I recieved your very kind letter my dear Aunt a few days since and hasten to answer it although without hopes of its my letter’s arriving at its destinatio n owing to the Danes who capture every American Vessel either passing the Sound or the Belts I have written by every opportunity but we have heard of the captur e of almost every vessel which contain’d our letters it is shocking to think of...
Having already written to Mrs Adams, by this conveyance, my dear Madam, I cannot think of losing, so favorable an opportunity, of repeating my thanks for your kind care of l my beloved Children; of whose happiness and welfare, I have a full conviction while under your protection—Never untill now , did I so sensibly feel the loss, of the little property I was once taught to expect, I might then...
I write you my dear Madam, to announce our safe arrival at Cronstad, after a most tedious, and dangerous passage, of eleven weeks; during which I suffer’d considerably, both fear and sickness, which continued throughout the voyage. my health is however good at present, and we propose to go on to Petersberg tomorow— I entreat you my dear Madam, to remember me most affectionately, to all our...
Your letter my dear Aunt, to my Mother, afforded me great pleasure. I was rejoiced to hear you had so far recovered your health, as to enable you to attend once more the daily avocations of your family You were fearfull my health would suffer by my confinement with you, but I asure my dear Aunt, I did not consider it a confinement in the least, and were I so happy as to have been of any...
You my beloved Sisters, whose time is ever filled , with the various duties of Life, can more readily pardon me, for not sooner acquainting you how, & when I got home—Leaving a large family only for a few weeks, makes domestic Cares press hard, & my Boarders Cloatths got very much out of repair, in my absence, & the cold season, & thanksgiving advancing, made new, highly necessary, so that no...
Abby was indeed very happy to receive a letter from so worthy, beloved, & good an Aunt—& it gives me sincere pleasure to find you were able to take your pen in hand, & convey Instruction & entertainment to your Friend—The long turn of cold weather has been very unfavourable for retiring into a chamber, for any literary pursuit, even at the other end of the room the Ink would freeze The only...
I recieved your very kind Letter for which I return many thanks I hope you will pardon the anxiety which my last expressed concerning my darling John who is I am well aware safer with you than with me but the continual apprehension his father and I suffer’d when he visited us last Summer induced me to write so particularly. We are sincerely thankful for your kindness to our Children and I...
Having at length recover’d from the fatigue of a very unpleasant journey I take the liberty my dear Aunt of writing to solicit the favour of your correspondence although I know your avocations to be so numerous I almost fear to trespass upon your time— It was with the greatest regret I found myself obliged to leave Boston without seeing you as I wished much to converse with you concerning John...
“Completely blest, to see my fellows blest.” I was happy to hear from you, & to find that you, & your family had enjoyed health, through a long cold tedious winter, for sickness at any time is a great affliction, more especially when it is necessary to have watches in long nights— We have been favoured with a remarkable share of health among our numerous boarders, untill lately, & have never...
Had I had an idea that my writing could have afforded you one moments satisfaction I should certainly have taken a much earlier opportunity of addressing you and offering my thanks for your kind attention to my darling boy I now entreat you to believe it was not owing to any inattention or neglect on my part and that nothing but a conviction on my part that you did not desire it could possibly...
The melancholy detail of the distresses of my dear Nephews Family, claimed a sympathetic tear, & while I regretted that Fortune had thrown him at such a distance from relatives, as no personal releif could be afforded, I solaced myself with the assurance, that the righteous are ever under the divine protection, & though they are afflicted, yet these Evils, may be “blessings in disguise,”...
I thank you for so kindly giving me information of our dear Sisters recovery. It has releived me from that heaviness & anguish, with which our hearts are oppressed, when we know we have any of our near & dear connections distressed with diseases either of body or mind—Your letter written the seventh of October had a speedy conveyance, & I could not but rejoice in the fineness of this day, as I...
I intended to have acknowled g ed the receipt of your Letter before this time, but our Scholars all study in our room, in the day, & in the Evening, Gilman reads History to Mr Cogswell whose Eyes are weak, & there seems to be so much to do, that I have scarcely a moments leisure—Abby’s being so sick all winter, prevented my doing any thing, to get forward in buisness. But thanks to a kind...
It is a long time since I have written to you, & so many things have intervened, that I know not what to select that may be interesting The burning of our Academy has been an affair of the greatest importance to us, & occasioned a good deal of work, & confusion in our family, for we, at that time had fourteen Boarders, & between seventy & eighty Students, who were flocking to the house, who...
I suppose the reason why I have not had a Letter from you for a long time, arrises from your expectation that I am upon my Journey; the Roads have been represented to me as so intolerable bad, and I know them to be so, that I have been prevaild upon to remain longer than I designd. I now think I shall stay untill after the 13th of Feby, the great important day which may in its concequences...
I received from you two kind Letters which I have not yet acknowledged; I am surprized to find that the frost & cold have not yet put a stop to the fever. I hope it will not be permitted to make a renewed visit, at the approach of the Summer with a severity never before experienced in our healthy and delightfull village—I cannot say that I have enjoy’d so much health this winter as the last. I...
I know my much loved Sister that you will mingle in my sorrow, and weep with me over the Grave of a poor unhappy child who cannot now add an other pang to those which have peirced my Heart for Several years past; cut off in the midst of his days, his years are numberd and finished; I hope my Supplications to heaven for him, that he might find mercy from his maker, may not have been in vain....
I have written to you my dear Sister twice since my arrival here. I know not but one of the Letters was in the lost mail I miss your pen which used to detail to me both public and private affairs. I have reason to bless God, that your Life is spared to your family, and Friends. I hope you will not be induced by any means to over exert yourself, or try your Strength beyond its bearing; a...
I arrived in this City on Sunday the 16th ult—having lost my way in the woods on Saturday in going from Baltimore we took the road to Frederick and got nine miles out of our road. you find nothing but a Forest & Woods on the way, for 16 and 18 miles not a village. here and there a thatchd cottage without a Single pane of glass—inhabited by Black’s—my intention was to have reachd Washington on...
I arrived in this City last Evening & came to the old House now occupied by Francis as an Hotel. Tho the furniture and arrangment of the House is changed I feel more at home here than I should any where else in the city, and when Sitting with my son & other friends who call to see me, I can scarc e ly persuade myself, that tomorrow I must quit it, for an unknown and an unseen abode. My Journey...
You will forgive me my Dear sister that I spaired both you and my Self the pain of a formal leave, and that I left you without bidding you an adieu. I never was so divided between Duty, and affection. the desire I had to remain with you, and the necessity I was under to commence a long and tedious journey at this late Season of the Year—my Heart was rent with the distrest Situation of yourself...
Detained here by a cold North East rain, I write to inform you I am thus far on my journey to Quincy 100 44 miles from Philadelphia which I left this day week in the afternoon; I tarried one day in N York and have taken Little Susan on with me. I went to the incampment upon Scotch Plains and lodged one night in the Col’s Log House, which I found quite a comfortable habitation. mrs. Smith was...
I have been expecting to get a Letter from you for Several days: I am the more anxious to hear from you as you wrote me in your last, that mr Cranch had got one of his bad Colds. I intended to have left this city to day, but the president having determined to visit Washington I could not think of taking the Coachman who has experience of his horses and is a sober good man. tho the president...
After I had closed my Letter yesterday, I received yours of the 28th. The Garden Seeds are in a small wooden Box in the garret Chamber over the best Chamber; made for the purpose of securing them from the mice; the Box is locked and mrs Porter has the key, tho She may have forgotten it. It is a long Box unpainted I Should like much to have a passage to the kitchin from the entry; my intention...
I think you have been exercised in deeds of Charity to that poor forlorn Man who would once have said, is thy Servant a dog, that he should become a living prey to worms, or what is worse? He is a most striking instance of Indolence, and having no stimulous to action! none of those tender endearing ties of wife, child, Sister, or Brother. Indolence Created first an apathy, and apathy crept on...
As I very seldom have any copy of my Letters I have forgotten what, & where were my last informations. Frequently I think I have mentioned things, when afterwards I have found, I had not—The Intention was so forcible upon my mind, that I believed the thing performed—But I find there is a wide difference between purposing & doing —I believe you thought me very unfeeling not to notice the...
It is with great pleasure my dear Sister that I can say to you, your Son has recoverd from a dangerous complaint which threw us all here into great distress and anxiety upon his account. He returnd from Court sick, it proved to be a Billious Cholic. mr Johnson wrote mrs Johnson that he had been to see him, but that he was so ill that he could not be seen. the Children too were all Sick, and...