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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Cranch, Mary Smith" AND Period="Jefferson Presidency"
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Your letter my dear Aunt, to my Mother, afforded me great pleasure. I was rejoiced to hear you had so far recovered your health, as to enable you to attend once more the daily avocations of your family You were fearfull my health would suffer by my confinement with you, but I asure my dear Aunt, I did not consider it a confinement in the least, and were I so happy as to have been of any...
You my beloved Sisters, whose time is ever filled , with the various duties of Life, can more readily pardon me, for not sooner acquainting you how, & when I got home—Leaving a large family only for a few weeks, makes domestic Cares press hard, & my Boarders Cloatths got very much out of repair, in my absence, & the cold season, & thanksgiving advancing, made new, highly necessary, so that no...
Abby was indeed very happy to receive a letter from so worthy, beloved, & good an Aunt—& it gives me sincere pleasure to find you were able to take your pen in hand, & convey Instruction & entertainment to your Friend—The long turn of cold weather has been very unfavourable for retiring into a chamber, for any literary pursuit, even at the other end of the room the Ink would freeze The only...
I recieved your very kind Letter for which I return many thanks I hope you will pardon the anxiety which my last expressed concerning my darling John who is I am well aware safer with you than with me but the continual apprehension his father and I suffer’d when he visited us last Summer induced me to write so particularly. We are sincerely thankful for your kindness to our Children and I...
Having at length recover’d from the fatigue of a very unpleasant journey I take the liberty my dear Aunt of writing to solicit the favour of your correspondence although I know your avocations to be so numerous I almost fear to trespass upon your time— It was with the greatest regret I found myself obliged to leave Boston without seeing you as I wished much to converse with you concerning John...
“Completely blest, to see my fellows blest.” I was happy to hear from you, & to find that you, & your family had enjoyed health, through a long cold tedious winter, for sickness at any time is a great affliction, more especially when it is necessary to have watches in long nights— We have been favoured with a remarkable share of health among our numerous boarders, untill lately, & have never...
Had I had an idea that my writing could have afforded you one moments satisfaction I should certainly have taken a much earlier opportunity of addressing you and offering my thanks for your kind attention to my darling boy I now entreat you to believe it was not owing to any inattention or neglect on my part and that nothing but a conviction on my part that you did not desire it could possibly...
The melancholy detail of the distresses of my dear Nephews Family, claimed a sympathetic tear, & while I regretted that Fortune had thrown him at such a distance from relatives, as no personal releif could be afforded, I solaced myself with the assurance, that the righteous are ever under the divine protection, & though they are afflicted, yet these Evils, may be “blessings in disguise,”...
I thank you for so kindly giving me information of our dear Sisters recovery. It has releived me from that heaviness & anguish, with which our hearts are oppressed, when we know we have any of our near & dear connections distressed with diseases either of body or mind—Your letter written the seventh of October had a speedy conveyance, & I could not but rejoice in the fineness of this day, as I...
I intended to have acknowled g ed the receipt of your Letter before this time, but our Scholars all study in our room, in the day, & in the Evening, Gilman reads History to Mr Cogswell whose Eyes are weak, & there seems to be so much to do, that I have scarcely a moments leisure—Abby’s being so sick all winter, prevented my doing any thing, to get forward in buisness. But thanks to a kind...
It is a long time since I have written to you, & so many things have intervened, that I know not what to select that may be interesting The burning of our Academy has been an affair of the greatest importance to us, & occasioned a good deal of work, & confusion in our family, for we, at that time had fourteen Boarders, & between seventy & eighty Students, who were flocking to the house, who...