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I received a few lines from you yesterday, in replie to mr Bates queries. I would have the Room above finishd off the Same Size with the lower Room, the North Clossets to remain in the Room and Chamber, the Stairs to be one flight, a portico with a flat Top which I would have leaded, and a Similar one built over the front door of the House, the two trees cut down, but I do not wish to have the...
we left philadelphia on Wednesday last. the day preceeding was very Hot a partial rain had waterd the Roads for 15 or 20 miles So as to render the first part of our journey pleasent. we were overtaken by showers and detained by them, but on thursday we found clouds of dust for want of Rain. troops and calvacades did not lessen it, and the Heat was intolerably oppressive, So much so as to...
Inclosed is a Letter for the Doctor as the contents are valuable you will be so kind as to deliver it yourself, and give me notice that you have received it and done so by the first post I Shall want to hear very often from you and to know how our affairs progress. I am most anxious about the painting and having the Rooms of the old House in order. Mrs Porter must have help. She will have Such...
I expected to have heard from you on Saturday, but no Letter came and on Wedensday but Still no Letter. I was dissapointed, but knowing your many avocations I concluded it must arise from thence. I hope not from Sickness tho you wrote me you was not well. I who have more leisure and no care of Family affairs but my orders can and do devote almost every morning in writing to Some Friend or...
Death, thou art no Respecter of persons; Washington is no more! a Great Man has fallen, and his End is peace, I shall dye said he, but death has no terrors for me; this Melancholy Event, was this day brought to this city by the mail and by private Letters; the Croup was the rapid disease which put a period to the days, of him whose, memory will I trust be Embalmed in the Hearts of all true...
I received your Letter yesterday. I know from what I saw and heard whilst I was at home that there was pains taken to make mr & mrs Porter uneasy, and that they were too apt to listen to Stories which were in themselves Idle, and arrised from Envy. many would be glad to get into their hands Such a charge as is left with mr & mrs. Porter, who would not be so honest in their care and attention...
I write you a few lines to day, but the weather is so Hot and close and the flies so tormenting that I can not have any comfort. The mornings instead of being pleasent as with you, are Stagnant. Not a leaf Stirs till nine or ten oclock. I get up & drop into my chair; without Spirits or vigor, breath a Sigh for Quincy, and regret that necessity obliges us to remain here. It grows Sickly. the...
I think you have been exercised in deeds of Charity to that poor forlorn Man who would once have said, is thy Servant a dog, that he should become a living prey to worms, or what is worse? He is a most striking instance of Indolence, and having no stimulous to action! none of those tender endearing ties of wife, child, Sister, or Brother. Indolence Created first an apathy, and apathy crept on...
I did not write to you the last week. I supposed you must be much occupied by the ordination which I hope is happily over and that I may congratulate you as well as myself upon again having a setled pastor, in whose society I promise myself much pleasure please god to continue my Life— I cannot entertain you with any thing new. I have the pleasure of mrs Cushings company frequently. She will...
I got to Westown on Wednesday by four oclock and was met two miles from Town by mrs Otis, accompanied by mrs Marshall who insisted upon my putting up with them I accordingly went, and was very kindly and hospitably receivd by the Col and his Family. the old Gentleman who is now more than 80 years, still retains much of the fire and sprightlyness of youth. he is very infirm in health, but...
Yesterday mr Johnson and his Mamma arrived here in good Health. by her I heard from mr & mrs Cranch. She poor thing has had a mishap. I rather think it good than ill luck however for it is sad Slavery to have children as fast as she has. She has recoverd tho she is thin & weak. Your son is rising Rising in his own estimation, which was the place where he most wanted it. he plead a cause, spoke...
I have been expecting to get a Letter from you for Several days: I am the more anxious to hear from you as you wrote me in your last, that mr Cranch had got one of his bad Colds. I intended to have left this city to day, but the president having determined to visit Washington I could not think of taking the Coachman who has experience of his horses and is a sober good man. tho the president...
The extreem heat of yesterday & the no less prospect of it this day, is beyond any thing I ever experienced in my Life. The Glasses were at 90 in the Shade Yesterday. tomorrow will be the 4 July, when if possible I must see thousands. I know not how it will be possible to get through. live here I cannot an other week unless a Change takes place in the weather. You had as good be in an oven the...
I know my much loved Sister that you will mingle in my sorrow, and weep with me over the Grave of a poor unhappy child who cannot now add an other pang to those which have peirced my Heart for Several years past; cut off in the midst of his days, his years are numberd and finished; I hope my Supplications to heaven for him, that he might find mercy from his maker, may not have been in vain....
I write you a few lines by mr Black altho I know the post will go quicker. I hope to get Letters to day from Quincy, now a week since I heard. we are thank God all well. the President is most worn down I tell the Gentlemen if they do not give him a respit Soon it will be too much for him—the Numurous addresses which pour in daily in abundance give him much additional writing. They are however...
I reachd this place yesterday morning and found Mrs Smith and Caroline very well. Mrs Adams and her two little Girls have been here three weeks. N York still distressd with the fever, tho many of the inhabitants have returned to the city, yet several of them have fallen since, and from the return of so many persons, new cases have been increased. I found a Letter from the President who writes,...
I received your kind Letter of Janry and intended writing you yesterday, but I know not how it is, I have less time for writing than formerly. I believe it is partly oweing to my not being able to improve the Morning as I used to. When I can sleep I indulge myself more, as it is not light enough to See to write till after Seven oclock. Our Weather is too warm. we shall have a Sickly Spring....
I suppose the reason why I have not had a Letter from you for a long time, arrises from your expectation that I am upon my Journey; the Roads have been represented to me as so intolerable bad, and I know them to be so, that I have been prevaild upon to remain longer than I designd. I now think I shall stay untill after the 13th of Feby, the great important day which may in its concequences...
I write you this morning just to say that there are dispatches from our Envoys up to April by which it appears that they have had Several conferences with Tallyrand, the Subject of which was obtaining Money—They are just decypherd and will be communicated. no Reception from the Directory, no like to be any. I can not but Say to you, what will Strike every one, that every hour they remain in...
You will forgive me my Dear sister that I spaired both you and my Self the pain of a formal leave, and that I left you without bidding you an adieu. I never was so divided between Duty, and affection. the desire I had to remain with you, and the necessity I was under to commence a long and tedious journey at this late Season of the Year—my Heart was rent with the distrest Situation of yourself...
I have only time this morning to write you a line, to inclose a Letter from mrs Brisler to her Sister. it is company day New Hampshire Conneticut & Massachusetts delegation dine with us to day: I am sure we have never had half so many Congress Ladies since I first came here. they do not expect any accommodations at the new city for them, and they seem determined to take their turn now We have...
By mrs Otis who leaves here this week I send a waistcoat pattern for William Shaw which I designd Should have reachd him before commencment. I Send it to you because I presume he will be at Quincy. if you will get it made for him you may charge it to me. the Stripes should go round the body. I have put some linning in. The Waistcoat should be linned throughout. I hope he will be attentive to...
I arrived in this City last Evening & came to the old House now occupied by Francis as an Hotel. Tho the furniture and arrangment of the House is changed I feel more at home here than I should any where else in the city, and when Sitting with my son & other friends who call to see me, I can scarc e ly persuade myself, that tomorrow I must quit it, for an unknown and an unseen abode. My Journey...
After I had closed my Letter yesterday, I received yours of the 28th. The Garden Seeds are in a small wooden Box in the garret Chamber over the best Chamber; made for the purpose of securing them from the mice; the Box is locked and mrs Porter has the key, tho She may have forgotten it. It is a long Box unpainted I Should like much to have a passage to the kitchin from the entry; my intention...
I just write you a line to day, to tell you we are well and to inclose Letters from my Family. We have not any thing new Since I wrote you last, except a fine rain, which is truly a blessing for the Grass and Grain were in a suffering condition and the dust so intollerable as to render riding very dissagreable. I am to drink tea on Board the Frigate United States this afternoon if the weather...
I have written to you my dear Sister twice since my arrival here. I know not but one of the Letters was in the lost mail I miss your pen which used to detail to me both public and private affairs. I have reason to bless God, that your Life is spared to your family, and Friends. I hope you will not be induced by any means to over exert yourself, or try your Strength beyond its bearing; a...
Tomorow morning I expect to leave this place, and proceed on my way to Philadelphia—where I hope soon to hear from you. Frank and family had arived before Brisler. They had only ten days passage. our Envoys I presume are ready to sail. The P writes me that he hopes they are gone that there may no longer be room for impertinent paragraphs fabricated by busy bodies who are forever meddling with...
If the Compass by which my course is directed does not vary again through unavoidable necessity I shall sit out for Quincy next week. we shall probably be 12 days in comeing. I shall want some preparation at Home. I will write to you from N york. Betsy wrote to her Mother to know if her sister Nancy was at home & that I should want her during my stay at Quincy The Hot weather of july has...
I have received but one Letter from you Since I left Quincy now near a Month; I have been here three weeks, except 3 days which I past at my sons in N york— next Monday I leave here for Philadelphia where it is thought we may now go with safety— I was in hopes to have taken Mrs smith with me, but her situation is difficult not having received any advise what to do, and She is loth to go for...
We leave this place this morning & hope to reach Home on fryday of the next week. I have written to mr smith to procure sundry articles for me in Boston which will require a Team to bring them to Quincy, & bags for oats will you be so good as to consult with mr Porter, and if mr Belcher can go to Town for them So as to get them up before we arrive I should be very glad. will you be so kind as...
We left Philadelphia on Wedensday last, the day preceeding was very Hot a partial Rain had waterd the Roads for 15 or 20 miles So as to render the first part of our journey pleasent, we were overtaken by showers—and detaind by them, but on thursday we found clouds of dust for want of Rain, troops and calvacades did not lessen it, and the Heat was intolerably oppressive, so much so as to nearly...
we reachd here yesterday being thursday the 7 th day from leaving home. we had very bad Roads, the Rains having washd all the stones bare, and the ruts were very deep I was much fatigued; Brisler and Family went on to N york mrs Brisler much mended in her Health by her journey. I hope when we get over our fatigue we shall all be able to say so. Betsy does not seem the worse for it, tho I think...
I write you a few lines this morning merely to inclose a Letter which I will thank you to cover and forward to Atkinson. I have not time to write this morning to Atkinson. inclosed I sent you a specimin of the Manners Religion & politeness of one of the 44 Gentlemen, Who can come and Eat of my Bread, & drink of my Wine one whom the Virginians consider as a Paragon of politeness whom they have...
we arrived here on twesday Evening on the 11 th , after a pleasent journey in which we met with but few obstructions the Weather on one Day prevented our travelling, and we tarried on sunday at Hartford, and on Monday morning were escorted out of Town by a Troop of light Horse, and the citizens in carriages and on Horse back as far as Weathersfield. we proceed then for New Haven about 40 miles...
The weather is Hot as we can bear the whole city is like a Bake House. we have a House with large and airy Rooms, or I could not sustain it I do bear it surprizingly well however, tho I long for a sea Breaze. I hope to leave here on monday and get on to Bristol 18 miles the first night. I shall want Several things put in order at home for our reception when I once get on my journey. I shall...
I have not written to you since I receivd your Letter giving me an Account of the ordination, the fatigues of which I should have been glad to have shared with you, and I could not but blame myself, that I did not write to request mrs Porter to have opend our House, and Stables, and to have accomodated as many persons as they could. It is now happily over and I congratulate the Town in having...
What no Letters from Quincy has been repeated every day for a week upon the return of every messenger from the post office. I was hunting up my pen this morning & going to sit down and inquire whether my dear sister was sick when yours of May 10th was brought me. you can hardly judge how impatient I feel if I do not hear once a week, but have you not received a Letter from me inclosing a Bill...
Your kind Letter reachd me on the 20th. I began to feel very impatient to hear from you; your Letter afforded me much pleasure; I rejoice that so worthy and amiable a man as mr Kendall allways appeard to me, is like to be so soon, and agreably setled. I would willingly exchange all the discourses I have heard here since I came and all I shall be like to hear, for the one half which e’en chance...
Mrs Smith Louisa mrs otis Rush Peters and a number of young Ladies are just gone to Congress to hear the Speech which is deliverd at 12 oclock to day; I should have liked well enough to have been of the party, but it would not have been proper—you will see it, as soon as you will get the Letter I presume Some people will not be pleased, I Suppose because it will not disclose enough about the...
I yesterday received your Letter of the 19th. I think you have testified your proportion of Respect in a handsome Manner to the Memory of the good and virtuous Washington.—That he ought to live in our Memories, and be transmitted to posterity as a Character truly worthy Imitation, is Right; but some Eulogyst have asscribed to him Solely, what was the joint effort and concert of many. To no one...
It is with great pleasure my dear Sister that I can say to you, your Son has recoverd from a dangerous complaint which threw us all here into great distress and anxiety upon his account. He returnd from Court sick, it proved to be a Billious Cholic. mr Johnson wrote mrs Johnson that he had been to see him, but that he was so ill that he could not be seen. the Children too were all Sick, and...
I received yours of June the first. I am quite delighted at the account you give of the Season and the appearence of vegetation. I was out yesterday at a Farm of Judge Peters call’d, Belmont, it is in all its Glory. I have been twice there, when I lived at Bush Hill, but he has improved both the House and Gardens since—after being six Months in a City, you can hardly conceive the delight one...
The weather has been so oppressively Hot for this week, and the streets of the City so nausious that I expect the concequences which must follow. they already begincomplaints of the Bowels are frequent & an inflamitory Soar throat. Frederick has got below after 5 bleedings Blistering &c Becky is now sick with it. hers is less upon her throat, more in her Bowels, not much fever. I hope hers...
I arrived in this City on Sunday the 16th ult—having lost my way in the woods on Saturday in going from Baltimore we took the road to Frederick and got nine miles out of our road. you find nothing but a Forest & Woods on the way, for 16 and 18 miles not a village. here and there a thatchd cottage without a Single pane of glass—inhabited by Black’s—my intention was to have reachd Washington on...
I received your Letter of the 23d this morning. I should be glad you would inform me from time to time the state mrs Mears is in. I have told mrs. Brislr that She was ill, but as she it cannot be of any service to mrs. Mears, I think best not to let her know of her relapse tho I fear it will finally be fatal to mrs Mears. Mrs Brisler would so distress herself as very probably to bring on her...
but I was thinking so much of Quincy, that I mechanically dated from thence; when I sent Letters for Louisa, mrs Brisler &c by yesterdays mail; I could not get time to add a line of my own; being engaged in writing to Berlin by the British packet. Since my last to you, I have recived a Letter from Mrs Johnson inclosing Letters to her, both from mr & mrs A— at which I rejoiced. She has thought...
The reflections which this morning have occupied my mind previous to taking my pen, have been of a Solemn & melancholy Nature. wherefore O Lord art thou thus contending with thy people, that one prop after an other is taken from them? The Sudden death of Dr Belknap has filld my Heart with Sorrow, following So Soon after dr Clark, and I presume from the account in the paper, in as Sudden a...
Mr Black got here on Thursday night. I was rejoiced to see him. It seemd next to being at home. I yesterday received your Letter of April 29th. I had heard before both of Sukys death and my dear little Marys. I felt hers the more sensibly, because she was more endeared to me from having been more with me than either of the other Children. my Heart is grieved for mr and mrs Smith who for this...
I wrote to you twice from East Chester. I left there the day I proposed; and had a fine passage across the North River. It was quite calm & not cold. We proceeded on our journey to Newark the same day, and there finding that we could go to Brunswick as conveniently by travelling through Springfield and Scotch plain to plainfield the place where the Col Smith is encampd with three Regiments, we...
I know not what could have become of a Letter written to you upon the 18 of december that upon the 30th You should not have received it,—I have written you more than once since that period, but do not recollect the Dates. I forget whether it was before or since then, that I inclosed to you a crown of a cap & Band. Since, that I have sent the Border and a Cap for mrs Morten, which I think you...