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J. Madison presents his respects to the Vice President, & incloses a letter inadvertently opened some time since; the error being just now discovered. RC and enclosure ( DNA : RG 46, TP , Indiana). Enclosure (7 pp.) is Elias McNamee to the president of the Senate, 12 Dec. 1809. Enclosure printed in Carter, Territorial Papers, Indiana , 7:682–86.
By direction of the President, I do myself the honor of transmitting to You the enclosed Certificate of your Election as Vice President of the United States. I am &c: DNA : RG 59—DL—Domestic Letters.
Th: Jefferson presents his respects to the Vice president and presuming, from the address of the within, that it relates to the legislative body, he takes the liberty of inclosing it to the Vice president as at the head of that body. DNA : RG 46—Records of the U.S. Senate.
The inclosed was delivered to me among a mass of letters from the post office, and reading only the first line of the superscription, I fell into the same error with the post office, & broke the outer seal. percieving the mistake, I did not break the inner one, and now inclose the packet to you, trusting to your indulgence for an error so entirely unintentional. I salute you with great respect...
The papers now communicated to your house for perusal being to be read in the other house also, and, as originals, to be returned to me, mr Coles, my Secretary, will attend to recieve them, after they shall have been read to the satisfaction of your house; and, having handed them to the other house for the same purpose, he will return them to me. I ask the favor of your aid in having this...
I congratulate you on your safe arrival with miss Clinton at New York, & especially on your escape from British violence. this aggression is of a character so distinct from that on the Chesapeake, and of so aggravated a nature, that I consider it as a very material one to be presented with that to the British government. I pray you therefore to write me a letter stating the transaction, & in...
§ To George Clinton. 27 January 1806, Department of State. “The Secretary of State has the honor to present his respects to the Vice President of the UStates, and to enclose his report to the Senate in pursuance of their resolution of the 2nd. March last.” RC ( DNA : RG 46, Reports and Communications from the Secretary of State, 9A–F1). 1 p.; in Wagner’s hand. Dated 1805; corrected date...
The inclosed letter from mr Monroe being to be communicated to the other house also, I ask the favor of you, as soon as it shall have been read to yours, to have it put into the hands of mr Coles, my Secretary, who attends to recieve & carry it to the other house. Accept my friendly & respectful salutations. DNA : RG 46—Records of the U.S. Senate.
14 February 1805, Department of State . “By the direction of the President of the United States, I do myself the honor of transmitting to you the enclosed certificate of your election as Vice-President of the United States.” Letterbook copy ( DNA : RG 59, DL , vol. 14). 1 p. On 14 Feb. 1805 the Senate passed a resolution that the president be requested to inform Clinton of his election as vice...
I had the honor of receiving, yesterday, your Excellency’s letter of the 6th instant. It is agreeable to me to find in it a confirmation of the inference, that you had given no countenance to the supposition of my agency or cooperation in the project, to which the story of Judge Purdy relates; and it only remains for me to regret that it is not in your power to furnish the additional clue, of...
On Saturday last I sent you a letter of which the foregoing is a copy, to which I have as yet received no reply. Intending to leave this place for New York on Saturday next, it is important that I should receive an answer before that day. I have the honor to be   Your Excelly’s Obed servt ADf , Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress. H to Clinton, March 2, 1804 .
If our correspondence does not terminate with your letter of the 29th. of February, received yesterday, I wish it to be understood that it proceeds merely from the desire of removing all ambiguity from a transaction, in which my character may be materially interested. It is perhaps the natural inference from what you have stated, that nothing took place on your part, to sanction or corroborate...
It is now a long time since a very ⟨odious⟩ slander has been in circulation to the prejudice of my character. It has come to my ears in more than one way, but always ’till lately without the disclosure ⟨of⟩ any source to which I could resort for explanation or detection. Within a few days, Mr. Kane of this City related to me a story as coming from Judge Purdy, in substance very similar to the...
I recieved last night your favor of the 22d. written on the occasion of the libellous pamphlet lately published with you. I began to read it, but the dulness of the first pages made me give up the reading for a dip into here & there a passage, till I came to what respected myself. the falshood of that gave me a test for the rest of the work, & considering it always useless to read lies, I...
To you I need not make the observation that of all the duties imposed on the Executive head of a government, appointment to office is the most difficult & most irksome. you have had long experience of it, and are I hope by this time ascertained of being in the way of experiencing it again, on which accept my sincere congratulations. disposed myself to make as few changes in office as possible,...
Your favour of the 14th instt with a Postscript of the 24th came to my hands yesterday: and I hereby acknowledge the receipt of Mr Wilkes’s draught on the Cashier of the Bank of Pennsylvania for the sum of two thousand five hundred dollars on account of our joint concern in the lotts in Coxburgh—and which, as appears by the items of an account enclosed overpays my dividend of the receipts...
[ New York, March 10, 1796. Letter not found. ] Clinton, a veteran of the American Revolution, was a member of the Continental Congress from 1775 to 1776. He served as governor of New York from 1777 to 1795. MS list of letters entitled “General Hamilton to Governor George Clinton,” Columbia University Libraries.
To the enclosed, I answered in a note, that the whole of the business to which it related, was entrusted to you: from whom, if application was made, complete information might be obtained. A few days afterwards, Mr Cooper applied to me personally; intimated that the land was valuable; that he was desirous of purchasing; and would give a good price for it. I answered as before, and added that...
Your favor of the 17th instt has been duly received. My enquiries after your health have been constant—and my concern for the ill-state of it—has been sincere. I beg you will not suffer the business, in which I am jointly interested, give you a moments concern; for I can assure you it has never occupied a thought of mine. But in order to make the transacting of it as easy to yourself, and as...
(Private) Dear Sir, Philadelphia Mar. 31st 1794. Your favor of the 20th instt, with its enclosures, came duly to hand; and for which you have my particular thanks. As there are those who affect to believe that Great Britain has no hostile intention towards this Country, it is not surprizing that there should be found among them characters who pronounce the Speech of Lord Dorchester to the...
The President has received your letter on the seisure of goods in the county of Ontario by certain officers of the British government , and measures having been taken to procure a full and certain statement of the case, whenever that shall be received, he will proceed to have done in it whatever the facts shall render proper. I have the honor to be with great respect & esteem Sir Your most...
Your favor of the 18th instt enclosing a statement of sales of lots in Coxburgh, belonging to us, has been duly received; and I thank you for the particular manner in which they are rendered. I did not mean to give you so much trouble. To know summarily what had been sold, and what remained on hand, was all I had in view. I hereby acknowledge the receipt of a Bank note (New York) for Sixteen...
(Private) Dear Sir, Philadelphia 27th Novr 1793 Not having the letters at hand, I am unable to refer to dates; but the one with which you were pleased to favour me, dated sometime in September, did not reach my hands before I had left this City. Immediately, however, upon the receipt of it (at my own house in Virginia) I put it under cover to the Secretary of War with directions to answer it...
I have the Honor to inclose you an Affidavit taken before me as a Magestrate of this County—as the outrage complained of has been attended with the most distressing consequences to some of the sufferers, and a most dangerous Precident to the safety of the Settlers on this Frontier—I thought it my duty to lay it before your Excellency. As I consider this unwarantable stretch of Local power on...
The President of the United States has received the letter, which Your Excellency addressed to him on the second instant. He considers it as a fresh proof of your disposition, to prevent the exercise of state authorities from clashing with those of the fœderal Government. The event which Your Excellency has communicated, is indeed, what you express it to be, of national concern, and the power...
Le General Galbaud, l’aude de Camp Concience, et le Caporal Bonne, se sont evader cette nuit a m am armée âu bord du Jupiter. ces hommes sont tous deserteurs et à ce titre nous avons le droit de les reclamer⟨.⟩ Je vous prie enconsequence Monsieur de vouloir bien faire deliverer des Warrants au Consul de la republique pour qu’il soient arretés et condutés a bord d’un des Vaissaus de l’Escadre....
The bearer hereof, Monsr. de Hauterive, appointed Consul at New York in the place of M. de Crevecoeur, having brought me some very particular recommendations from friends at Paris , who would not give them lightly, I comply with their desire in presenting him to your notice. In a short conversation which I had with him, I found him a man of literature, and a genuine republican, under which...
I have the honor to acknolege the receipt of your Excellency’s favor of the 19th. inst. with the exemplification of the treaties accompanying it as also the Bill of the secretary, amounting to 12½ dollars, for which I take the liberty of inclosing him a bank post note thro’ your Excellency, as I know not his particular address. Be pleased to accept my thanks for your attention and assurances...
I duly recieved your favor of the 5th. inst. and have now to request transcripts of the Indian treaties made under the state of New York, as it is conceived they may be necessary to put the Commissioners in full possession of all facts relative to the subjects they have to treat of, and to prevent their being surprised by the producing of any matter whatever with which they may be...
As it is possible and perhaps probable that at the ensuing conferences on Lake Erie with the Northern and Western Indians they may be disposed to look back to antient treaties, it becomes necessary that we should collect them, in order to be in a state of preparation. This can only be done with the aid of the several state-offices where these treaties have been deposited, which, in New York I...
[ Philadelphia ] September 14, 1791 . Discusses the possibility of the British establishing a post south of Lake Champlain. Df , in the handwriting of H, RG 59, Miscellaneous Letters, 1790–1799, National Archives. Clinton was governor of New York.
Your letter of the 7th instant, with its inclosure, did not reach me ’till yesterday. The intelligence, it communicates, is of a nature both serious and important. Indeed, the step it announces, as about to be taken by the British, would be one so extraordinary in every view, as to justify a question, whether the indications, which are alleged to have been given, have not rather proceeded from...
“The enclosed Papers will show your Excellency the Nature and necessity of my Business here any farther explanation of my Motives will also I conceive be unnecessary, how far the Measures I have pursued will be consistant with your Ideas of the Nature and Tendency of this Business I am at a loss to determine; The peculiar Delicacy of my Situation, and consequent embarrassment I presume may be...
With very great sensibility I have recd the honor of your letter dated the 10th instt and consider the kind & obliging invitation to your House until suitable accomodations can be provided for the President as a testimony of your friendship & politeness; for which I shall ever retain a grateful sense—But if it should be my lot (for heaven knows it is not my wish) to appear again in a public...
Give me leave to introduce to you Col. Smith and his lady, two Persons in whose Welfare I am in an high degree interested. Mr. Smith as a young stranger will Stand in need of the candour and benevolence of the Citizens of New York, and as your excellencies Example and that of your Family has great influence, let me recommend her to your protection and patronage and to the Friendship of your...
Give me leave to introduce to your Excellency, The Reverend Mr Fr. Adr. Vanderkamp a gentleman of very brillant Talents and great Merit: who is at Present suffering Persecution for his Attachment to Liberty. His abilities and his Knowledge of the Dutch language, will I hope introduce him to some Employment, in which he may be Useful as well as happy. As a Clergyman he was vastly esteemed and...
It is the wish of several of the Regents of the University that a Meeting should be appointed on some business of importance; and I am requested to write to you on the subject. It will be only necessary for you to write to Mr. Harpur who is secretary of the University desiring him to publish an advertisement according to mode prescribed in the act. I am Dr Sir with great respect & regard  ...
The bearer Mr Timothy Tuttle has been with me to obtain on some terms—I did not enquire into them—part of the lands we have a joint interest in up the Mohawk River. The answer I have given him is, that whatever you shall do concerning them I will abide by. With great esteem & regd I am—My dear Sir—Yr most Obedt and Affecte Hble Sert ALS , NjHi ; LB , DLC:GW . For the New York land held jointly...
At length, I have obtained the means for discharging the balle I am owing you. Mr Morris will direct his corrispondent in New York to pay you the sum of Eight hundred and forty dollars, which will be about the amount of £325.6.0 (the balle of your Acct as rendered to Jany last) with intt thereon of Seven prCt till the middle of this month. As this is intended as a letter of advice only, I...
Not having heard, or not recollecting who the President of the Society of the Cincinnati in the State of New York is, I take the liberty of giving you the trouble of the enclosed. I am endeavouring by the sale of Land, to raise money to pay for my Moiety of the purchase on the Mohawk River—So soon as this is effected I will write your Excellency more fully. In the meantime, with every good...
I promised you a letter by the last Post, but it was not in my power to fulfill it, business not my own, & with which I really ought not to be troubled, engrosses so large a portion of my time (having no assistance) that that which is essential to me, is entirely neglected. I now send you Hooe & Harrisons second Bill upon Mr Sylvanus Dickenson; altho’ I hope, & expect the first will have been...
A few days ago I had the pleasure to receive your favor of the 5th Ulto—Your other letter of the 26th of December came duely to hand, and should not have remained so long unacknowledged had I not been in daily expectation of accompanying my answer with a remittance. Disappointment followed disappointment, but my expectation being kept up, I delayed writing from one Post day to another until...
When the Marqs de la Fayette left this place, he expected to embark abt the 14th or 15th Instt on board the Nymph frigate, at New York, for France. Therefore, as this event may have taken place before this letter gets that far, I take the liberty of putting the enclosed packet under cover to you, with a request, if he should have Sailed to forward it by the first French Packet which follows....
A few days ago I had the pleasure to receive your favor of the 12th Instt. Altho’ I felt pain from your Silence, I should have imputed it to any cause rather than a diminution of friendship. The warmth of which I feel too sensibly for you, to harbour a suspicion of the want of it in you, without being conscious of having given cause for the change—having ever flatterd myself that our regards...
M r C. W. Schubert, de Rawitz, in Poland, proposes to embark in march for New York, and there to establish himself, in Trade, chiefly in German Linnens He proposes to remove with him his Wife & Child. I have been desired to give him a Letter of Introduction, a favour which is very often asked and I dont know how to refuse. Upon these occasions however I only mean to request ordinary Civilities...
After as prosperous a journey as could be expected at this season of the year, I arrived at my seat the day before Christmas, having previously divested myself of my official character—I am now a private Citizen on the banks of the Potomack, where I should be happy to see you if your public business would ever permit and where, in the meantime, I shall fondly cherish the remembrance of all...
It was with exceeding great concern I heard by Mr Gouvr Morris that you had had a return of your Fever—I hope it was slight, and that you are now perfectly restored to health—No man wishes it more sincerely than I do. I have been able to negotiate a matter with Mr Robt Morris by which about Seventeen hundred pounds York Currency will be thrown into your hands on my Acct which sum, when...
I do myself the honor to inclose to your Excellency Copy of a Letter from Generals McDougall Clinton & Cortlandt in favor of Majr Hamtramck. My knowledge of that Officer is such, as makes the task of Recommendg him to the notice of the Government of this State, extremely pleasing—being assured that if it shall be in their power to favor his views his conduct will always justify any appointment...
New York, December 1, 1783. Writes as the legal representative of “Mrs. Chamier, widow and Administratrix of Daniel Chamier deceased.” Asks that George Birks, who owed money to Daniel Chamier, be “apprehended” and compelled to appear in court. ADS , Chicago Historical Society. This memorial was sent to the governor because of the absence of proper officers of government in New York City which...
By this Express, your Excellency will receive the requests of the Pay Master and Quarter Master, Generals, for the Loan of One thousand Dollars each, to enable them to supply the present necessities of the Army—if the terms of their proposals are agreeable, I should be very happy in your Excellency’s compliance with their requests. I have the honor to be Your Excellency’s Most Obedt Servant...