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Often in this Vale of Tears, My Dear Nephew, & Niece, are we called to sympathize with each other, under the bereaving Dispensations of Heaven—It is the pleasing melancholly Office of Humanity, Friendship, & Affection. Yes! in affliction, I have experienced how grateful is the benign, interested aspect—how soothing to the swoln Heart, is the soft Eye of Pity, & the calm, gentle voice, of kind...
in my last letter to you of Septr. the 30th I promised you to sketch a plan for learning French and in a letter to Tommy I promised him a list of books such a list will fullfill my Promise to both I will therefore send a Copy of this letter to each of you. The grammers in common use in america are Boyer Chambaud & Tandam every one of which is imperfect and inaccurate in addition to these I...
I once more wish you a prosperous Voyage an honourable Conduct and a happy Life. Remember your Characters as Men of Business as well as Men of Virtue, and always depend on the Affection and Friendship of your Father RC ( Adams Papers ); addressed: “My Sons”; internal address: “John Quincy and Thomas Boylston Adams”; endorsed by JQA : “My Father 14. Sept r: 1794. / Rec d: at Boston.” Tr ( Adams...
We received your short Letter of 19 November written just as the pilot from the mouth of the Elbe was about to leave you. Since that time untill this day we have had almost incessantly Easterly winds blowing, & we hope that you enjoyed the benefit of them, & long before this find yourself restored to the bosom of our Country & friends. Since your departure several circumstances have occurred...
Doctor Johnson somewhere says that a short letter to a distant friend is a sort of insult; but I hope you will not be of that opinion—I know however that it is an unpleasant disappointment, after having your expectations raised by the sight of a distant friend’s superscription and seal, to find them only for a duplicate, or a letter to a third person; and I therefore add a few lines, on...
a Conversation at table between mrs A—— and mr J——n last thursday. mr J. Pray who is that Gentleman who sits next but one to the president? That is mr Waln of pennsilvana. I never Saw him to know him before. pray who is the next? that is mr Ho l mes you surely know him, Smiling. he is a democrat. No I do not. mrs A. I know nearly all the gentlemen of Both houses, a few voilent demos. excepted...
Received Quincy 9th Feby 1810 of T. B Adams Twenty-five Dolls and fifty Cents in full for One quarter’s interest due upon J Q. Adams’s Note due the first instant. $25.50 MHi : Adams Papers.
I am always happy to find an opportunity of conversing with you, as we cannot verbally do this it is our duty to do it by writing. I now have a good opportunity to write a few lines to you by Captn. Lovett in a Ship belonging to Mr. Cobet of Beverly, but I can write but a few lines to you for I must write to all my Freinds. We have had the worst 3 Weeks that ever I pass’d in my life. Bad...
I received your two Letters together of August 20th. I have every day since designd to write to you, but have not been very well. I do not know the cause yet for many years, the Month of Sep’br. has depressed my spirits more than any other. I believe it always brings with it some dregs of the old Ague and fever. I most sincerely mourn for the distressess of N York and Philadelphia; but know...
I received your Letter inclosing the one from your Brother—I do not find the extract you mention in Wayne Paper. I would have had it inserted in I. Russels before I leave here, but that I know not how it may be introduced in the US Gazet, and it would not be & proper they should clash. but if there is any hesitation upon the Subject in Philadelphia, there will not be any here. I well remember...
Since the original of my last letter was written, I have received no letters from America, but there are newspaper Accounts and letters to other persons untill late in May—Universal War seems to be blazing out all at once—Here it has already commenced— I had indulged a faint hope that the tragical catastrophe which terminated the days of Spencer Perceval, was intended by Providence in Mercy to...
There has been an interval of Eight Months Since I received a line from Your Hand. this Suspension of intercourse grows Daily more and more painfull to me as I learnt from your Brother that you had been sick first with a severe attack of the Rhumatism, and after ward with a Billious Remitting fever; I fear that the Climate of Holland is peculirly unfavourable to you, as your constitution is...
Inclosed is a Letter for your Brother should he arrive as we expect in Philadelphia; I am told by mr Welch who was yesterday to See us that you have Letters from Hamburgh from your Brother dated in july—if & family Should arrive in health, as I pray God they may, there first visit will be I presume to Washington. I think as they will be so near it ought to be—tho I can Scarcely give up the...
About 9. O’Clock this Morning we spoke a fishing Schooner from the Grand Bank, belonging and bound to Plymouth—We were in the midst of a thick fog, as we have indeed been most of the time since you left us, and still are. The Schooner was within g speaking distance when we first spied her, and our Captain had barely time to ask them on their arrival to give notice of their having seen us. So I...
I have been so much gratified by the mail of to day as to induce me to continue the mail as far as Quincy. I was somewhat prepared for this recount—its conformation from such a source is truely gratifying. With my best respects to your father You will with the return of the letter have the goodness to let me know how he is. Yrs MHi : Adams Papers.
My last letter to you upon private affairs was of April 29. Since which I have received none from you, when untill last evening, when your’s of 4. to 12. March, from Quincy, and of 11. May from Baltimore, both come to hand—In the last, you mention having written me, at full length, the week before by the way of London, but this letter I have not received Your account of the administration of...
I told William Shaw of the event which you have questioned, and from the best Authority, even the hand writing of the Father in a letter to me of the 11 of April, “The day before yesterday at half past three oclock afternoon, my dear Louisa gave me a son. She has had a very severe time through the winter, and is now so ill that I dare not write to her Mother to give her notice of this Event;—I...
I am much delighted to learn that you intend making a visit to the old Mansion. I wish you could have accomplished it so as to have been here by this time, which would have given you an opportunity of being at Commencment, meeting many of your old acquaintance, and visiting the Seat of Science where you received your first Rudiments; I shall look daily for you You will find your Father in his...
I believe I am in arrears with you, for two or three Letters, which is owing in some measure to my indolence, but in a greater degree to the stagnation of events worthy of communication— The purpose of my present Letter is to enquire of you respecting a warrant from the Treasury for some money, which it seems must be sent here to be signed by your father before it can be sent back for payment....
When I have written to your Brother I feel as if I had exhausted all the subjects which it is proper for me to write upon, but as your Hand writing allways gives me pleasure tho I see it only upon the superscription of a Letter, or in a few Promissory lines in the cover, I judge you will allways be gratified with a few words from me tho they contain no more than a Bullitin of our Health and...
You have here enclosed, a draft on the United States Branch Bank at Boston to the order of Charles Newcomb, for 172 dollars 54 Cents, being the amount of dividends on the six and three per Cent Stocks due to him standing on the Books here, and for which I have signed receipts as his Attorney. The payment comes down to the second Quarter of 1816—inclusive—Upon the subject of the other...
Your letter of the 2d: has been duly received, and has contributed with those of your father received at the same time to cheer my mind, which every thing of a political nature around me struggles very hard to depress—Hitherto since my arrival here, I have thank Heaven enjoyed much domestic comfort from the health of my wife and children—this has been more favourable than I ever knew before,...
If you have once more set your foot upon American ground, and are in Safety, God be praised I have sufferd great anxiety for you, knowing your intention of comeing this Winter. You may well suppose my Heart Leaped for Joy when I found that Captain Jenkins was safely arrived. I for three days, was expecting to see you, but upon writing to mr Smith for intelligence I could not get any concerning...
Well my dear Son, SCarolin has behaved as your Father always Said She would. the consequence to us personally is that we retire from public Life: for myself and family I have few regreats, at my age and with my bodily infirmities I shall be happier at Quincy. neither my habits, or my Education or inclinations have led me to an expensive Stile of living; So on that Score I have little to mourn...
I duly received your letters of the 21st: enclosing the pamphlet of Gentz, and likewise the post-note, with your account—This last I have not yet examined, but I presume it to be substantially correct.—I am again to repeat my thanks for your attention to my affairs. I hope to have the pleasure of seeing you soon here, though I hope also that the tremendous menaces of malignant yellow fever at...
I should like to subjoin in a note to the discourse I delivered on your father—the genealogical notices which are proper relating to your father & mother.— I quoted your father’s diary or memorandum upon the visit of Messrs Gridley & Otis—late in 1765 when he was asked to join them in resisting the stamped paper.—If this document be at your house & not in the bank, I should like when I call to...
I have read your Brothers Letters, with much pleasure; that part of them; in which he so dutifully, affectionatly, and generously tenders all his property for the use of his parents, affected both your Father and me most tenderly; thank God, we have not any occasion for it; our desires are moderate, our oeconomy strickt, our income, tho moderate, will furnish us with all the necessaries, and...
Your Packet by M r: Clarke at length was delivered me on the 21 st: and your letter of the 11 th: of this month, by M r: Calhoun the day preceding. Quincy’s letter is indeed a valuable one, and contains some opinions which are at once just important, and not sufficiently established in the minds of Americans in general. I would enclose it back to you, but think I may as well be the bearer of...
Since my last letter to you, I have not had the pleasure of receiving a line from you—I have it not yet in my power to unpack my books, and consequently not to take out and send you those belonging to you. But I have sent you a set of the Massachusetts Laws, and a copy of the translation from Bülow, by the Sylvia; Captain Seth Daggett, who has already sailed, and will probably reach...
We have so little business on hand that it was not thought necessary to commence the year with a Session for transacting it; and this morning we have adjourned for the purpose of letting the Tunisian Minister come and pay us a visit; I cannot employ the leisure of the moment better than in answering your letter of the 15th: and 16th: of last Month. Your opinion of the Message will probably not...
Col l: Hamilton arrived in Philadelphia, the night before you left it, but from the pressure of business more immediately urgent, was not prepared for me untill last Friday. On that Evening I left the City, in company with Gen l Knox, and arrived here (quite overcome with fatigue, and somewhat unwell of the complaint which you brought from the same place) on Saturday at about 6 in the Evening....
M r: Clagett has this moment delivered me your favour of the 29 th: ult o: and informs me that he goes again for Holland to-morrow morning. I have therefore only time to tell you that I am still waiting for that permission to return which I have been more than two months in hourly expectation of receiving. My detention here is doubly mortifying from the consideration that as my presence is...
This morning I did See in a N.Y. paper—the announced death of your Revered Father—my beloved and respected Frend—during more than forty years—alas! He is no more—I am nearly left alone—and fostered—in vain—the hope, that I Should See Him once more! You with your Dear Lady and family enjoy’d this happiness, and rendered Him by your unrelenting attentions—in his last moments—thankful to His God....
I received yours of the 4th with double pleasure occasioned, by the Encouragement you give me to hope that I shall See you Soon at this chosen spot. There are indeed in this Country, all the Characters and humours that you describe, and there will be such for many years to come, which will keep alive the extravagant Spirit of democracy longer than it would live of itself. Exaggerations of...
I have not written you a line since my return to Quincy. I have found full employ to get my House in order, and my Family arranged, against your Fathers return which was on Wednesday last; we have all once more assembled at the old Habitation in Safety, without any accident, except to myself. I unfortunatly, got my foot in a hole in one of the carriages as I was getting out, and fell through,...
I have recd. the two Volumes of Lectures on Rhetoric & Oratory by your brother J. Q. Adams Esqr. Having not had an opportunity of perusing them, I can only return my thanks through you, and anticipate the pleasure promised by the application of his talents & taste to those interesting subjects. Accept my friendly respects MHi : Adams Papers.
I Congratulate you my dear Son, upon your safe arrival in your Native Country; and myself that I have the prospect of seeing you again, a prospect which for many Months I had no hopes of realizing. as your Father can inform you, and to the very low State of my Health, it is oweing that I cannot so soon as I wish enjoy the pleasure of welcomeing you Home; and meeting you at Philadelphia, where...
I am glad to find by your Letter that you are so well situated, at Mr. Sewalls, make my Compliments to that Gent. and thank him for the Kind present of his translation of Young—it appears to me to be well done. You will write to me from time to time, if you want Books, or any assistance in your studies, from this side the Water. I hear a good account of your Conduct, your studies you must...
Agreeable to my promise in my last, I now inclose to you Mr Jeffersons letter, which I consider to be the counterpart of the letter to Mazzei and which, you must have more philosophy, than I think you possess, to read without bitter indignation—without execrating the author, in the most unqualified terms. The whole letter is in the canting style of the vilest demagogue of our...
It is probable that the opportunity by which I now write you, will be the last that I shall have of dispatching letters to America through Sweden before the return of the navigable Season here— It is the seventh occasion of which I have availed myself since the close of the last Season— But the Gentlemen who went from hence in October, November, and even the first part of December, for...
By turning to my files I perceive, that the last Letter I have received from you, is dated the 7th: of May last, and that it was answered by me, on the 27th: October—I have since then written several times to my mother, and should have written as frequently to you, had the opportunities of writing occurred, or had a different subject for writing presented itself by the same opportunities.—But...
I fear to look back to the Date of my last Letter to You, least it should accuse me of omission. There have been but very few opportunities this Severe Winter, of writing to You Rude Boreas laid an embargo, and our harbours have been frozen for six weeks, so that not a vessel could go out, or come in. for about a Week we have had a Thaw. I have received within a fortnight your Letters of...
The apt and excellent quotation from Horace’s epistles, in your letter of 26th: ulto: made me turn over all the editions and translations of the old poet, that came within my reach, to find the context—When once a man takes up Horace, it is not easy to lay him down again—So in turning over the leaves I stumbled by the strangest accident imaginable upon the fourth Ode of the second book—But...
Inclosed is a paper I promised in a former Letter— I shall not write to Washington untill I get on my journey, but you may write under cover to col Smith, and let me know when the president was in Philadelphia. I do not get any news papers from thence now— Your affectionate / Mother NRU .
I enclose my third letter upon the book concerning the State of France. I know not whether I shall have time to finish this examination, & my project of furnishing you with frequent articles upon foreign politics & literature, will of course cease by my recall, which I have now received. As I suppose it was known to you, some days after it took place, you will probably not write to me again,...
It was a fortunate circumstance for us, that Mr. Jones had so prosperous and so expeditious a voyage and Journey—In sixty days after he went out to Quincy, to take my Mothers and your wifes letters for us, he delivered them into our hands—As they brought us the gratifying intelligence that all our friends were then well, it gave us not only the pleasure which such tidings must always bring...
It is only within these very few days that I have found a moment of time to examine the particulars of your account with me for the year 1818 which you transmitted to me last January, upon which, I find occasion to make very few, and unimportant remarks—Under date of 20. June it gives credit for $550.. Dividend from the Fire and Marine Insurance Office, instead of which it should be the...
On the principle of returning a separate answer or reply to every letter that I receive from you, I remain yet one in arrears to you, since in my last I acknowledged the receipt of two—dated 27. March and 7. May. With the last dated but first received of these came the number of the Anthology containing the most learned Critique upon my Lectures—It reminded me of a famous Speech of which I...
I have just now wrote to my Brother charles & you would not like it if I did not write to you also. but now I have my pen in my hand what shall I write you about for you do not encourage by writing to me; you should ask mamma to write for you I have wrote very often to you but Mamma says that you have not recd. but once from me but I hope that you have recd. some more before now surely you...
I am very much concerned, least you as well as your Brother, should think hard of me, for neglecting so long to write to you, but the multiplied Cares and engagements of Life added to indifferent health must plead my Excuse M r: Murray is to take the place of your Brother, and M r. Dandridge is to be his private Secretary, your brother will go to Lisbon, and you I hope will return to...