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Inclosed is a paper I promised in a former Letter— I shall not write to Washington untill I get on my journey, but you may write under cover to col Smith, and let me know when the president was in Philadelphia. I do not get any news papers from thence now— Your affectionate / Mother NRU .
I have had the honour to receive your Letters of the 29th. September, and 21. October, and the Bills of which you inform me, amounting together to one thousand Pounds Sterling, have appeared and been duly accepted by me as the agent of your Brother John Quincy Adams Esqr. With great Esteem and Respect &c. NHi : Rufus King Papers.
Upon the subject of your letter of the 1st. I can only say that I was prepared to hear all that you relate before I heard it from his wife and Col. Smith. A being so lost to all sense of morality & all social feelings cannot be reclaimed. There is MHi : Adams Family Papers, Letterbooks.
The above is a duplicate of the letter, which I Sent about ten days ago, with the papers mentioned in it—I now enclose duplicates of the power & letters & authenticated copies of the original note of hand & Letter from Jacob Mark & Co: MHi : Adams Family Papers, Letterbooks.
Doctor Johnson somewhere says that a short letter to a distant friend is a sort of insult; but I hope you will not be of that opinion—I know however that it is an unpleasant disappointment, after having your expectations raised by the sight of a distant friend’s superscription and seal, to find them only for a duplicate, or a letter to a third person; and I therefore add a few lines, on...
a Conversation at table between mrs A—— and mr J——n last thursday. mr J. Pray who is that Gentleman who sits next but one to the president? That is mr Waln of pennsilvana. I never Saw him to know him before. pray who is the next? that is mr Ho l mes you surely know him, Smiling. he is a democrat. No I do not. mrs A. I know nearly all the gentlemen of Both houses, a few voilent demos. excepted...
I received your Letter inclosing the one from your Brother—I do not find the extract you mention in Wayne Paper. I would have had it inserted in I. Russels before I leave here, but that I know not how it may be introduced in the US Gazet, and it would not be & proper they should clash. but if there is any hesitation upon the Subject in Philadelphia, there will not be any here. I well remember...
My last letter to you upon private affairs was of April 29. Since which I have received none from you, when untill last evening, when your’s of 4. to 12. March, from Quincy, and of 11. May from Baltimore, both come to hand—In the last, you mention having written me, at full length, the week before by the way of London, but this letter I have not received Your account of the administration of...
If you have once more set your foot upon American ground, and are in Safety, God be praised I have sufferd great anxiety for you, knowing your intention of comeing this Winter. You may well suppose my Heart Leaped for Joy when I found that Captain Jenkins was safely arrived. I for three days, was expecting to see you, but upon writing to mr Smith for intelligence I could not get any concerning...
I Congratulate you my dear Son, upon your safe arrival in your Native Country; and myself that I have the prospect of seeing you again, a prospect which for many Months I had no hopes of realizing. as your Father can inform you, and to the very low State of my Health, it is oweing that I cannot so soon as I wish enjoy the pleasure of welcomeing you Home; and meeting you at Philadelphia, where...
I am very much concerned, least you as well as your Brother, should think hard of me, for neglecting so long to write to you, but the multiplied Cares and engagements of Life added to indifferent health must plead my Excuse M r: Murray is to take the place of your Brother, and M r. Dandridge is to be his private Secretary, your brother will go to Lisbon, and you I hope will return to...
I wrote you last week, and now repeat for your information in case that letter should fail in the conveyance, that I have concluded to keep my obligations in Holland, and not to dispose of them, as I had proposed to you in my letter of 29. April—But that you may on the 1st: of January next, draw upon the Secretary of State 2000 Dollars, on my account, and send me an order upon Messrs: Willink,...
There is a Coll Thomas Johnson, a member of the Genl. Assembly of the State of Vermont, who lives at Newbury in that State; to whome I committed the care of the Vermont Lands in which I am concerned. I have always found him very carefull of my Interest, and reasonable in his charges for what he does for me. I formerly mentioned to him that your Father, the President, owned some Rights of Land...
I received last night your favor of the 18th. I thank you for your account of the proceedings of the Supreme court.—I really believe you are right & that I was erroneous, in what we have said about the influence of politicks at the bar in Pensylvania. Indeed any where affected politicks do a man no good. I did not mean to prejudice you against your Quakers friends, who I doubt not are...
I have not received a letter from you since I left you. As I hear nothing of the epidemic in Philadelphia, I begin to hope that such a calamity will this year be spared to that city. I should be gratified to hear of your health and success. I could fill a sheet with curious anecdotes of politicks & electioneering, but as this is a subject on which I ought not to permit myself to write speak or...
I wrote to you last Evening requesting You to meet me at the Susquahanah; but I did not reflect that it was two days Journey. this Evening Leiut partner has arrived and has tenderd me his Services; mr Evans furnishes me with a carriage to philadelphia provided we can cross the River if I cannot get over, I must depend upon the chapter of chances—if I can get over I expect to be in on tuesday....
Two days ago, I received together your letters of September 9. & 23. Numbers 9 & 10.—I now enclose copies of my letters of 30 May, & 1. July, together with a duplicate of a letter to Messrs: Jennings & Woddrop of Charlestown, which I sent you with the former of them—I still remain indebted to those gentlemen for the six dollars, & must again request you to send them the money—I regret...
On the 10th: of last month I wrote you a letter, informing you that I had remitted to Mr. King, our Minister at London five hundred pounds sterling, and authorizing you to draw upon him to that amount—I likewise gave you directions for the employment of the money.—I have now remitted to him five hundred pounds more, for which I hereby authorize you in like manner to draw upon him, and which...
I received your Letter of 9th, with respect to the Carriage I believe I did not stipulate for a false linning, but I would chuse to have one—I shall take a carriage from here to Philadelphia and have some prospect of being accompanied by mr Cranch who has buisness on, provided he can leave the new office, to which he is appointed, Commissoner of the City in the room of mr Scot who is dead I...
I am greatly pleased with your letter of the 30 Aug. Every part of it shows a sound understanding & a manly honest heart. Your conduct at the meetings was wise as well as generous. Never mind majorities. Weigh well & judge right & never fear being in a minority. You are right to mix with your fellow citizens at their invitation to their consultations. Although Horatius has sacrificed to the...
I last weak informed you that I had withdrawn from Amsterdam all the stocks I held there, and had remitted to Mr. King, in London fourteen hundred pounds sterling, for which I authorised you to draw, and requested you to place the proceeds in the most advantageous manner, but not in any institution or fund depending upon our national Union; for the generality of our Countrymen are so far from...
I have appointed Mr. Jay, Chief Justice. He may refuse, if he should, I shall follow the line of judges most probably,& then there will be a vacancy. I wish to know if Mr. Ingersoll would accept an appointment as one of the assistant Justices of the superior court, & in that case I wish for his opinion as well as yours of the proper character for the office of district Attorney. Will Mr....
I enclose herewith, a letter for Messrs: Jennings & Woddrop of Charlestown, which I will thank you to forward to them & to send them at the same time Six dollars, which you will charge to me—I suppose you will easily find an opportunity, & be sure to send the dollars with the letter, for it is to repay money, which they have advanced, to comply with a request from me, & I know not otherwise...
I arrived here last Evening and this morning received your cover, enclosing the Letter from the Secretary of the Treasury.— There are Letters here from America, as late as the 29 th: of April. M r: Murray had then sailed so that he may be looked for every day. I have not yet seen M r: Damen, and of course have made no arrangements. I shall make none immediately for my own departure. I feel a...
I herewith enclose to you the following papers. 1. An original Note of hand from Jacob Mark & Co: signed by their agent John Speyer to Mr Engel for 26000.—dated 5. April. 1795. 2. An original letter from Jacob Mark & Co: dated New York, 26. July. 1799.—which may serve in case of need to prove their acknowledgement of the debt. 3.—A power of attorney from Mr. Engel to you, authorising you to...
I received yours of Sep’br. 18th. I have melancholy intelligence to communicate to you respecting poor B. Adams. Last week of an Evening he had put a Horse into a Waggon for the purpose of conveying three quarters of Beaf to a Neighbours. The Horse was restiff, and he gave him a Whip upon which he started, threw him down, and the wheel went over one Side of his face so as to break the jaw...
I thank you for your favour of July 26. I always rejoice to hear of your Arguing Causes. This Arguing is the way to business. Argue; Argue; Argue; forever when you can, and never be concerned about the issue, any further than you ought to interest yourself for truth and Justice. If you Speak in public, tho you loose your cause, it will Serve your reputation, if you Speak well, as much as if...
I received last night your favour of the 15th, the Sentiments and expressions of which are Such as are such as cannot fail to render your Character Prosperity and Happiness more dear to me than ever. An Office must be procured, and the Price or Rent must not be an Obstacle. I had rather pay for you a high Rent than you should not have an Office in Market or Chesnut Street. Your Brothers...
In one of your Letters you say there is much murmuring concerning the Convention with France. This is natural. Those who have laboured to defeat the Negotiation and those who have endeavoured to make it unpopular, from the beginning will still strive to defeat and to disgrace the Result. I shall confine myself at present to one point the apparent Collision between this Convention and our...
I last Evening received yours of 30 december and would have you close the bargain with him Feilding for the Carriage provided the carriage has not been much used. he must put the Cypher A upon it and pray attend to the Steps. they must be Strong & come low down, I cannot mount high. my day is over for that, and my infirmitys require particuliar attention to that part of the carriage. a coach...
We have received your letter of the 12th: to Mrs. Adams, but that which you mention as having written the day before to me, has not come to hand. Perhaps the pleasures of the feast put it out of your mind to send it as I cannot well account otherwise for its not having arrived—My principal concern is that it would inform me whether you have received all the letters I have forwarded to Mr...
On a lu, Tabius, avec beaucoup de plaisir. Il est tres Sage, tres savant et tres elegant.—The Article he vindicates is now well understood here and is I believe universally allowed to be no Violation of our Engagements with any other power.—Even higher and Stronger ground is taken by Some of the ablest Lawyers and it is even contended that we had a right to go back to the Statu quo, and revive...
I write you a line for the Sake of inclosing to you Russels paper, which contains the most exceptionable part of Coopers address—Mr G——r had it when I wrote you last. Truxtons Letter also appears. It is true that the Heads of departments were of Truxtons opinion, accordingly Talbots commission was made out and forwarded. But the papers which throw light upon the whole were not sent at the...
I know not how it happened, but so it was that your favor of the 11th: instt: did not come to hand untill the day before yesterday—And yesterday came those of 17th: and 19th: both together—I am sorry that you cannot get sooner off, and very glad that you are likely to get so good an opportunity for conveyance. I shall send you some more letters before you go; at present I have none...
I am very much gratified to find by your favour of the 26 th: that your Journey from Brussels was so pleasant, and that you are so well satisfied with what you had seen.— I shall request Mess rs: Moliere to extend your credit with their correspondents at Paris. There is a Danish vessel going to Lisbon from Amsterdam in the course of three weeks or a month. I shall go to Amsterdam in a few days...
The Roads and Weather prevent my leaving this place this day as I had designd; mrs Cushing and Otis advise me to take lodgings at mr Stall’s in 3d street, your former lodgings I shall want a chamber with two Beds and one Bed for a man Servant; I always chuse to have my maid and Susan Sleep in the Room with me. She has got the hooping cough. I hope the worst part of it is over. When I get to...
I have received your’s of the 26th. enclosing one for Mr Welsh—I now forward those Letters for America, with which I threatned you in my last—Of all the news which you believed or expected to believe, the only parts likely to be confirmed, are the capture of the Leander with Capt. Berry on board, and of the two french frigates by the Colossus—The burning of the transports in the Nile has no...
Mess rs: Moliere, will this day extend your credit with their correspondent at Paris, to the amount of 4000 livres more. This I presume will amply suffice for your occasions. I requested you by my last letter, to be here not later than the 25 th: of this month. There is to be a Ball on that day at the Hotel de Suéde. The Count desires me to tell you, that you will be very much wanted as a...
Without an extraordinary portion of incredulity, I might still dispute, the full confirmation of your news, as the whole of the Brest squadron, was not taken by Sir J. B Warren, and we are yet quite uncertain here what part of it really fell into his hands—But I had rather beleive in the official confirmation of the reports announcing the destruction of the transports at Alexandria, though it...
I have recd this Evening yours of the 14th. My little bark has been oversett in a Squal of Thunder and Lightening and hail attended with a Strong Smell of Sulphur. Nothing remains for me, but to indulge that Vanity which I have found out lately is considered as the predominant feature in my Character, by Singing the Song of Horace Virtus repulsæ nescia sordidæ Intaminatis fulget honoribus Nec...
I write a line in answer to your’s of the 9th: and to send you the enclosed for J. Hall, though the wind here is easterly since yesterday, and you may have improved it, to sail upon your voyage. There are no Russian troops marching towards Pomerania—There is a new Edict here against secret Societies, of which I shall immediately forward a translation, though probably not in time to reach you...
I cannot send you a duplicate without adding a Line to it; for there is a pleasure in knowing that our distant friends are well, though but one day later than we have already heard from them We have been spending several days at Charlottenburg with Dr Brown’s family, and Louisa’s health which never fails to droop at Berlin in the summer has derived benefit from it. To morrow morning we set out...
In your Letter of the 9th, you say, that you will not say you disagree with Manlius, in his opinion, that the downfall of the federal Cause is to be attributed to the Mission to France—In this opinion I fully believe that both of you are mistaken; and I am confident, I could convince you of this, if I had an opportunity of recalling to your recollection, the Passages of the times before and...
I received last evening your letter of 5. May, and having written you twice within a fortnight have now not much to say.—But I cannot forbear to give you my best thanks for your care relative to my affairs both at Boston and New York, as well as your own use and employment of the authority which I gave you to draw in my behalf—I fully approve of all your proceedings. I have this day drawn upon...
I thank you for yours of the 9th and its contents, and for the pains to have taken to Search Authorities upon the Collision of Treaties. The Point I think is explained and proved very fully, and So it is understood in England. The Sixth Article however is by no means nugatory. It is of great importance to France. Our Treaty with Britain expires in two years after the termination of the present...
I gave you the earliest information of Mr. Jeffersons election. Last night a mob of about fifty collected about the houses near to the capitol and compelled the inhabitants to illuminate them in honor to Mr. J. This passive submission of the federalists to the will of a rascally mob is in my opinion degrading in the lowest degree. I never would have submitted I would have died first. No...
The daily Duties of my office require so much Writing that my hand and head are fatigued & exhausted before I have half done: and this must be my apology for not writing you till now. I hope you are now well settled in your Office and pursuing your studies. Practice will come in time, but the most certainly from an incessant Attendance upon the courts and taking minutes & making Reports of...
You cannot concieve Mr. Adams’s disappointment on opening your letter and finding it directed to me I was so agreeably surprized that I absolutely kissed it. Would to heaven we could have you back again. I did not think I should have felt the loss of your society so much but we really are not like the same family as for your brother I never saw him so much affected at anything in my life I...
The Secretary of State has just informd me of an opportunity to write by way of Amsterdam. I embrace it to send you a few lines only. The vessel is to sail this day, and part of my morning which might have been devoted in writing, will be occupied in prepareing to receive the Youth of this city to the amount of 800 it is said who are comeing in a body, to present their address to the P...
Agreeable to your request and my own inclination I have sent out a person to your releif Thomas Welch has determined to accept the offer made him and embark for Hamburgh. There is some Hazard now in crossing the ocean. I have inclosed to you, your Friend Quincy’s oration deliverd upon the 4 of July. it is a very handsome performance and does honor to him. I hope it will bring him forward into...