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We received your short Letter of 19 November written just as the pilot from the mouth of the Elbe was about to leave you. Since that time untill this day we have had almost incessantly Easterly winds blowing, & we hope that you enjoyed the benefit of them, & long before this find yourself restored to the bosom of our Country & friends. Since your departure several circumstances have occurred...
Doctor Johnson somewhere says that a short letter to a distant friend is a sort of insult; but I hope you will not be of that opinion—I know however that it is an unpleasant disappointment, after having your expectations raised by the sight of a distant friend’s superscription and seal, to find them only for a duplicate, or a letter to a third person; and I therefore add a few lines, on...
a Conversation at table between mrs A—— and mr J——n last thursday. mr J. Pray who is that Gentleman who sits next but one to the president? That is mr Waln of pennsilvana. I never Saw him to know him before. pray who is the next? that is mr Ho l mes you surely know him, Smiling. he is a democrat. No I do not. mrs A. I know nearly all the gentlemen of Both houses, a few voilent demos. excepted...
I received your two Letters together of August 20th. I have every day since designd to write to you, but have not been very well. I do not know the cause yet for many years, the Month of Sep’br. has depressed my spirits more than any other. I believe it always brings with it some dregs of the old Ague and fever. I most sincerely mourn for the distressess of N York and Philadelphia; but know...
I received your Letter inclosing the one from your Brother—I do not find the extract you mention in Wayne Paper. I would have had it inserted in I. Russels before I leave here, but that I know not how it may be introduced in the US Gazet, and it would not be & proper they should clash. but if there is any hesitation upon the Subject in Philadelphia, there will not be any here. I well remember...
My last letter to you upon private affairs was of April 29. Since which I have received none from you, when untill last evening, when your’s of 4. to 12. March, from Quincy, and of 11. May from Baltimore, both come to hand—In the last, you mention having written me, at full length, the week before by the way of London, but this letter I have not received Your account of the administration of...
When I have written to your Brother I feel as if I had exhausted all the subjects which it is proper for me to write upon, but as your Hand writing allways gives me pleasure tho I see it only upon the superscription of a Letter, or in a few Promissory lines in the cover, I judge you will allways be gratified with a few words from me tho they contain no more than a Bullitin of our Health and...
If you have once more set your foot upon American ground, and are in Safety, God be praised I have sufferd great anxiety for you, knowing your intention of comeing this Winter. You may well suppose my Heart Leaped for Joy when I found that Captain Jenkins was safely arrived. I for three days, was expecting to see you, but upon writing to mr Smith for intelligence I could not get any concerning...
Well my dear Son, SCarolin has behaved as your Father always Said She would. the consequence to us personally is that we retire from public Life: for myself and family I have few regreats, at my age and with my bodily infirmities I shall be happier at Quincy. neither my habits, or my Education or inclinations have led me to an expensive Stile of living; So on that Score I have little to mourn...
I Congratulate you my dear Son, upon your safe arrival in your Native Country; and myself that I have the prospect of seeing you again, a prospect which for many Months I had no hopes of realizing. as your Father can inform you, and to the very low State of my Health, it is oweing that I cannot so soon as I wish enjoy the pleasure of welcomeing you Home; and meeting you at Philadelphia, where...
Agreeable to my promise in my last, I now inclose to you Mr Jeffersons letter, which I consider to be the counterpart of the letter to Mazzei and which, you must have more philosophy, than I think you possess, to read without bitter indignation—without execrating the author, in the most unqualified terms. The whole letter is in the canting style of the vilest demagogue of our...
Inclosed is a paper I promised in a former Letter— I shall not write to Washington untill I get on my journey, but you may write under cover to col Smith, and let me know when the president was in Philadelphia. I do not get any news papers from thence now— Your affectionate / Mother NRU .
I am very much concerned, least you as well as your Brother, should think hard of me, for neglecting so long to write to you, but the multiplied Cares and engagements of Life added to indifferent health must plead my Excuse M r: Murray is to take the place of your Brother, and M r. Dandridge is to be his private Secretary, your brother will go to Lisbon, and you I hope will return to...
Your several favors are before me. The letter for———I sent by the first mail, after receiving it. I delayed sending your brothers letter, expecting that you would comply with your promise, and send me the whole series—then I should have returned them altogether. For the pamphlet of Gentz, please to receive my best thanks. I have been highly delighted and instructed by the perusal, and doubt...
In my last letter, by a halfline of postscript, I told you that peace between the Austrians & French was signed. I wrote this upon information I had received just before I closed my letter, & although I had reason to believe it authentic, it has since proved erroneous. In wishing to give the latest news, you know how often we are liable to give groundless humours for facts, & therefore it is...
I wrote you last week, and now repeat for your information in case that letter should fail in the conveyance, that I have concluded to keep my obligations in Holland, and not to dispose of them, as I had proposed to you in my letter of 29. April—But that you may on the 1st: of January next, draw upon the Secretary of State 2000 Dollars, on my account, and send me an order upon Messrs: Willink,...
To your long letter of March 4–12. I ought to say something more than is merely contained in mine of the 1st: instt: in answer, without waiting for your letter by the way of England, written in the beginning of May, which I have not yet received. Yesterday a couple of small packets of news-papers and cuttings dated February and March, came to hand, which I suppose you sent with your letter...
There is a Coll Thomas Johnson, a member of the Genl. Assembly of the State of Vermont, who lives at Newbury in that State; to whome I committed the care of the Vermont Lands in which I am concerned. I have always found him very carefull of my Interest, and reasonable in his charges for what he does for me. I formerly mentioned to him that your Father, the President, owned some Rights of Land...
I received last night your favor of the 18th. I thank you for your account of the proceedings of the Supreme court.—I really believe you are right & that I was erroneous, in what we have said about the influence of politicks at the bar in Pensylvania. Indeed any where affected politicks do a man no good. I did not mean to prejudice you against your Quakers friends, who I doubt not are...
Somewhat more than a month ago I received the very welcome intelligence that the vessel on board of which you were a passenger had arrived at New-York. Some days later, a letter from Mr. Murray mentioned that he had seen your arrival announced in a Philadelphia newspaper of the 15th: of January.Soon after, I received from our ever dear and honoured mother a letter of 1. Feby: fully confirming...
I received only three days ago your N: 22. dated the 6th: of December, and containing the melancholy tidings of the death of our unhappy brother at New York. I had been informed of it two days earlier by a letter from my excellent friend Mr Murray at the Hague, who had seen an account of it in a New York Gazette.—Of the Situation in which he has left his wife and children you say nothing, but...
I have not received a letter from you since I left you. As I hear nothing of the epidemic in Philadelphia, I begin to hope that such a calamity will this year be spared to that city. I should be gratified to hear of your health and success. I could fill a sheet with curious anecdotes of politicks & electioneering, but as this is a subject on which I ought not to permit myself to write speak or...
To know that one Cannot freely say that Black, is Black; even tho it be “darkness visible,” or that white is white, tho the new fallen snow is not purer, is fettering ones faculties, as well as restraining ones pen. Yet in such perilious Times as the present, freely to discuss motives which lead to measures, or to Characterize the Actors “who fret and Strut their hour upon the stage” would not...
I wrote to you last Evening requesting You to meet me at the Susquahanah; but I did not reflect that it was two days Journey. this Evening Leiut partner has arrived and has tenderd me his Services; mr Evans furnishes me with a carriage to philadelphia provided we can cross the River if I cannot get over, I must depend upon the chapter of chances—if I can get over I expect to be in on tuesday....
I suppose you flatter yourself, that having more than three months ago got safely out of Silesia, you are to hear nothing further about it, but indeed I shall not let you off so cheap. There still remains a very short geographical, statistical, & historical account of this interesting province, which I feel it my duty to write—Whether you will conceive it your’s to read it, I need not enquire....
Two days ago, I received together your letters of September 9. & 23. Numbers 9 & 10.—I now enclose copies of my letters of 30 May, & 1. July, together with a duplicate of a letter to Messrs: Jennings & Woddrop of Charlestown, which I sent you with the former of them—I still remain indebted to those gentlemen for the six dollars, & must again request you to send them the money—I regret...
On the 10th: of last month I wrote you a letter, informing you that I had remitted to Mr. King, our Minister at London five hundred pounds sterling, and authorizing you to draw upon him to that amount—I likewise gave you directions for the employment of the money.—I have now remitted to him five hundred pounds more, for which I hereby authorize you in like manner to draw upon him, and which...
I received your Letter of 9th, with respect to the Carriage I believe I did not stipulate for a false linning, but I would chuse to have one—I shall take a carriage from here to Philadelphia and have some prospect of being accompanied by mr Cranch who has buisness on, provided he can leave the new office, to which he is appointed, Commissoner of the City in the room of mr Scot who is dead I...
The day after I wrote you last; I received yours of 17 Jany: brought by Mr. McHenry, and which in Chronological order should have come to hand first. My present object is only to say something relative to my own affairs. By letters from our mother written before your arrival, I learnt how Charles had conducted, with regard to my property....To comment upon his proceedings would be useless, but...
I am greatly pleased with your letter of the 30 Aug. Every part of it shows a sound understanding & a manly honest heart. Your conduct at the meetings was wise as well as generous. Never mind majorities. Weigh well & judge right & never fear being in a minority. You are right to mix with your fellow citizens at their invitation to their consultations. Although Horatius has sacrificed to the...
I received with sincere pleasure the confirmation of your Safe arrival in your Native Land from under your own Hand yesterday by post. Oweing to Bad Roads, the post from N York did not arrive untill twesday, tho due on Saturday. I had written to you, as you Will find by the first Mail after I heard of your arrival, and tho I should most affectionately rejoice to see you soon, I Shall not urge...
I have just got your agreeable favours of 8–9— & 11— May, and as this is the last day upon which I can write to reach you at Paris, and I have but little time for the post, I shall be short. M r: Arnoux’s letter has given me great pleasure, and I wish you if you have time, to give him my grateful thanks for it; for his kind remembrance of the family, as well as his attentions to you. Madame de...
I last weak informed you that I had withdrawn from Amsterdam all the stocks I held there, and had remitted to Mr. King, in London fourteen hundred pounds sterling, for which I authorised you to draw, and requested you to place the proceeds in the most advantageous manner, but not in any institution or fund depending upon our national Union; for the generality of our Countrymen are so far from...
As I have bespoke your company, upon our journey into Silesia, I begin this letter at our first resting station from Berlin. Hitherto we have indeed seen little more than the usual Brandenburg sands, & perhaps you will find our tour as tiresome as we have found it ourselves—I cannot promise you an amusing journey, though I hope it will prove so to us; & if at the sight of this my first letter...
I promised my dear Thomas to write to him by the May packet. On Fryday Evening at the drawing Room the British Minister informd me that he would take charge of any Letters I might have to send. I wrote to your Brother by the April packet, since which there has been a continuation, and increase of that American Spirit which I informd him was rising into activity. I have sent to your Brother, by...
I have appointed Mr. Jay, Chief Justice. He may refuse, if he should, I shall follow the line of judges most probably,& then there will be a vacancy. I wish to know if Mr. Ingersoll would accept an appointment as one of the assistant Justices of the superior court, & in that case I wish for his opinion as well as yours of the proper character for the office of district Attorney. Will Mr....
As I have stipulated that you shall peruse none of my letters written upon this tour, but with your map in hand, I need not tell you perhaps that this is the first town we have reached after entering upon the borders of Silesia. Its distance from Frankfort is ten German miles—We left that place yesterday at one in the afternoon, & experienced again we had done more than once before how...
The dimensions of my paper compelled me to break off my last letter before I had finished giving you an account of all we had seen the forenoon we stayed at Bunzlau. Yet I had little more to say; for our visit at the orphan house, which is at the same time a public school, scarcely deserves mentioning. We saw there nothing but a chapel & a dining hall, in which there were about thirty boys at...
As my purpose is only to give you the great & general outlines of the Silesian history, with a special view to show the origin of the conquest, which made it a Prussian province, I shall merely, to complete the chronological series of its Austrians sovereigns observe to you, that the Emperor Leopold 1. at his death in 1705 was succeeded by his eldest son, Joseph. 1 who dying in 1711, made way...
Just as I enclosed my last letter to you, I had yet the opportunity to acknowledge the receipt of your No. 21. dated October. 25.—But its contents claimed further notice from me, which I had then neither time, nor room to bestow. I am sensible that by being removed from the turbulent & disgusting Scene of perpetual Scene electioneering, I am spared many a detail of vexation, which I should...
I enclose herewith, a letter for Messrs: Jennings & Woddrop of Charlestown, which I will thank you to forward to them & to send them at the same time Six dollars, which you will charge to me—I suppose you will easily find an opportunity, & be sure to send the dollars with the letter, for it is to repay money, which they have advanced, to comply with a request from me, & I know not otherwise...
Yesterday morning early we took our departure from Freystadt, & came to this place; a distance of eight german miles; five of which are in single stage from Sprotau here. The face of the country has visibly & greatly improved as we came along; & although we still had to wade through miles of sands more, or less deep, we were frequently relieved by patches of good roads, & by beautiful fields...
I have remitted to Mr. King in London five hundred pounds sterling, for which I have informed him that I should authorize you to draw upon my account, and which he will accordingly discharge upon bills drawn by you. I wish you to take the first opportunity of a favourable exchange upon London, to draw for this moneys which you will employ for me as you shall see most expedient In the same...
I arrived here last Evening and this morning received your cover, enclosing the Letter from the Secretary of the Treasury.— There are Letters here from America, as late as the 29 th: of April. M r: Murray had then sailed so that he may be looked for every day. I have not yet seen M r: Damen, and of course have made no arrangements. I shall make none immediately for my own departure. I feel a...
As there is some probability that Thomas Welch will Embark before I shall return to Quincy, I write from hence; I shall esteem myself peculiarly fortunate to see you again in your Native Country, a longer residence abroad in your Situation, would be wholy incompatable both with your interest and future establishment in Life, as you will have to commence again in your profession—you may also...
I herewith enclose to you the following papers. 1. An original Note of hand from Jacob Mark & Co: signed by their agent John Speyer to Mr Engel for 26000.—dated 5. April. 1795. 2. An original letter from Jacob Mark & Co: dated New York, 26. July. 1799.—which may serve in case of need to prove their acknowledgement of the debt. 3.—A power of attorney from Mr. Engel to you, authorising you to...
If your map of Silesia is a good one, the spot from which I date this will be marked upon it. If not you must make a point about half way between Hirschberg, & the Riesen gebirge , & you will hit the identical krestcham , or inn, from which I write. It is the first moment I have had for the purpose since I closed my last to you—We were told before we left Berlin, that the tour of these...
I have not taken my pen to write you a line before since my return, tho I have daily intended it. You know I must necessarily have many avocations upon first comeing home, beside the constant interruptions from company; I was happy to learn as I did a few days since by your Letter of June the 1st that you had returnd in safety to the city improved in health. God grant that it may be continued...
Yourrs of the 20th and 21st are received. I also received this morning a compleat sett of the Portfolio without any letter or direction respecting them. Presuming they were sent to be at my disposal, I shall send them by tomorrows mail, to Anapolis where I expect to get many subscribers. I some time since sent a sett to Boston and another to young Chace at Baltimore and if I had a number more,...
I received yours of the 21 July upon my return from a Ride. Your Father Said he had a Letter for me worth a thousand pound’s I found it had been read; I complaind, but was told It was put in unseald, on purpose that it might be read. I had not any objection to its being Seen—yet you know one chuses in Such cases to be judge for themselves; I delight very much in your Letters. you have a...