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    • Adams, John Quincy
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    • Adams, Thomas Boylston

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Documents filtered by: Author="Adams, John Quincy" AND Recipient="Adams, Thomas Boylston"
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I received your short Epistle by M r: Thomas at Ipswich, where I was then attending the Court of Common Pleas: and at the same time he gave me very agreeable information respecting your performance at exhibition; which has been confirmed to me from several quarters. From the conversations which have repeatedly passed between us, you will readily imagine how much I was gratified, to hear that...
I have just received your favour of the 22 d: inst t : thanks you know are “the exchequer of the poor.” upon that exchequer of mine you are entitled to bills to a large amount. I assure you I feel the obligation of your attention to my trunk, which has not yet arrived, but which will be very acceptable when it comes. But your Letter has excited my curiosity, and I find myself very much...
I received by the last Post your short favour, inclosing a much longer one to Quincy which I have punctually delivered: I know not whether this will reach you before your departure from Philadelphia; if it does not it can do no harm: and if it does, as you have concluded upon coming this way with the family it may be of some service to me.— You recollect doubtless that while I was in...
I received your favour of the 17 th: inst t: from New-York, and am happy to hear you had got well so far on your journey. I hope you will be equally punctual on your arrival at Philadelphia. I must request your attention to the memorandum, which I left with you last Spring; and that you would not forget to send my segars before the navigation closes for the Season. the numbers of the Gazette...
I received last week your favour of the 17 th: of last month, and found in it none of that tediousness which you seem to apprehend: indeed I suspect your fears were in some measure dictated by your indolence, and that you make them a pretext in your own mind, to relieve you from the tediousness of writing: but this pretence must not serve you: for I can assure you, that your Letters will...
I have been for more than three weeks indebted to you for two very agreeable Letters, which Mr. Otis brought from you. They would not have remained so long unanswered but for a variety of circumstances which have concurred to engross all my time during that period. It is possible that you may have observed in the Centinel about a month since, that a Committee of 21 inhabitants at this Town was...
I believe I am in arrears with you, for two or three Letters, which is owing in some measure to my indolence, but in a greater degree to the stagnation of events worthy of communication— The purpose of my present Letter is to enquire of you respecting a warrant from the Treasury for some money, which it seems must be sent here to be signed by your father before it can be sent back for payment....
I have received your Letter containing the orders upon the branch bank, and also that with the bill of lading of 3 barrels; I ought to have written you this information a post or two ago, but some business, more indolence, and most of all forgetfulness was the occasion of my omission. I suppose you will soon commence Attorney, and I understand you have some thoughts of retiring into one of the...
Your father will be the bearer of this Letter, and probably will find you at Philadelphia, which our late accounts represent as being totally free from the pestilence, which raged with so much violence for two or three months.— Remember however and be cautious— In the midst of the general calamity, for which your friends participate in the general affliction, they recollect with pleasure,...
I received by the last post your favour enclosing a draft upon the branch Bank, for 100 dollars. The political speculations of which your fraternal feelings have formed so favourable a judgment, originated in motives at least as disinterested, as are the common sources of patriotism. That a literary reputation is an object of Ambition to the writer, it would be false and absurd to deny. That...