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As it is a rainy morning which of Cource prevents my going to Church—I feel a greater propensity to scold you first—then read my Bible—did you not Say you would return in August—how then coud you let so favorable an Oppertunity pass, as Thomas Adams and not fulfill your engagement—when I heard his Name announced I ran with eagar expectation to meet you—but to my great disappointment he told me...
I congratulate you all my dear Children upon the birth of this lovely Girl— I have been over anxious for my dear betsey & am now reliev’d—blessed by the over ruling power for every mitigation we receive—ben has just brought your letter, and I can scarcely write for Joy—why have you not mentioned the day of its birth—& how my betsey was, had she a good time—Tell Smith your Mother says you must...
your Letter of Feb’ry I duly recived, and Should Sooner have replied to it, but I wished to consider the subject of it maturely, and to give you the best advise in my power. If you have a prospect that you can be supplied with a number of Boarders in the spring, it will be adviseable for you to continue your House, but you certainly cannot make it answer with one only. commencing in winter...
I will not delay a Single hour to replie to your Letter of Jan’ry 8th just received, and to acknowledg the receipt of yours of Nov’br which ought not to have lain so long unanswerd. Since mrs Smith has been with me, I have not been in the habit of writing much, and when ever a reluctance to the pen commences, it increases with time, untill it becomes urksome. I know I ought to have written to...
I will not delay a single hour to replie to your Letter of Jan’ry 8th just recived, and to acknowledge the receipt of that of Novbr which ought not to have lain so long unanswerd; Since Mrs Smith has been with me I have not been in the habit of writing, and when once a reluctance to the pen commences, it increases by time with time untill it becomes urksome. I know I ought to have written to...
It is more than a Month, Since a half finishd Letter has lain by, designd for you, and now it is like an old Almanac out of date, and lost its original value. I Shall therefore commit it to the flames, and begin a new Score. but Susan keeps you so constantly informd of all the events and transactions which transpire, and that in her own sprightly way, that She leaves me nothing to amuse you...
As the comfortable and reputable Establishment in Life, of my Grandchildren is very near my heart; your Letter of the 14th of this month could not fail to give me much pleasure. Yesterday the 25th. the anniversa r y, the 50th Aniversary of my own marriage, your Letter was brought to me from the Post Office. I devoutly pray that my lovely Abigail may be as happy in her marriage as I have been....
I was glad to learn through mr Johnson that you had an agreable journey home Your visit here seems more like a vision, than a reality,—and you hurried away so soon, that I had not half time enough to become acquainted with mr Johnson, to whom it was really doing an injury, for the more he was known, the more estimable he appeard I had not one half hours conversation with my Dear Abbe, by...
The promptitude with which you, complied with my request, merits my warmest thanks, and I hasten to acknowledge the receipt of your kind note, and its contents. I beleive I promised to inform you of this careless affair, which stands thus; I was playing with a ring, that had been placed upon my finger, and which I was to return, in three weeks, when unfortunately it fell from my hand, into the...
I have this moment received your letter, and hasten to inform you that the things are all ready. Mr Dexter procured a hogshead, quite large enough to contain all, and I have fixed every thing to the best of my ability; the desk I was fearful would injure the bed, I have sewed it in baize; the screws and key, are also sewed in the towel, I hope they will do no injury. the volume of Hume is...
I this morning received your Letter, dated the 10th I sympathize with you, under the repeated Bereavements you have been call’d to Suffer. your graces, and your virtues, are now call’d into action. it is not Stoical indifference, but a christian Submission, and resignation to the all wise dispensations of your heavenly Father, which is required of you. alive to the tenderest sensibilities, you...
I can hardly believe, that such a length of time has elapsed since I have written, or heard from you; be assured, I should not have remained so long silent, but through necessity; for the last three weeks, I have been deprived of the use of my right hand, by a violent attack of the Rheumatism which settled there, and has rendered me absolutely useless. I have thought constantly of you, and...
I have hoped to hear from you by every post, and to learn how your Health is. I have not heard from the valley Since the 22nd of April. William’s account then of his Fathers Health left me anxious for him. he wrote me, that as soon as his Father was able, he designd taking a house, or lodging at Utica. he will then be near to you, and in the midst of a society, which may enable him to recover...
You will (I hope) excuse me for addressing you openly and without preamble when informed of the subject—of the most interesting moment in the concerns of mankind. What I anxiously hope and now presume to ask for is no less than the hand of your daughter in marriage. A constant wish to appreciate justly a sincere and firm attachment returned, will be the unceasing spur to every exertion to...
I enclose a letter from Mr Clark to you, which he gave me yesterday. May we hope for your approbation and blessing? it is a subject, which I cannot write upon, at present. I feel very anxious to hear from you, my dear Parent and may your precious life be prolonged many years, to witness the happiness of your children. Most tenderly you daughter NIC .
Your two kind letters of May 25th and June 1st received this morning, with the one enclosed, Oh my Dear Parent, how gratifying to me; is this assurance of your approbation, You think I have decided in favour of Mr Clark; indeed I have never given him any positive answer, but have invariably, requested him, to forbear urging me upon the subject, untill I heard more explicitly from you; Never,...
Think not my Dear Daughter that I have been silent through want of feelings—I have sympathized with you under the repeated Shames you have been called to endure, in the last I have been no common sharer, I have wept with the relatives, over the remains of a Brave, unfortunate Benevolent Man, a kind affectionate & tender companion of her, whom he has gone to join in the World of Spirits,...
I have been expecting to hear from you every day, for this month past, but have not received a line. I have been in Boston, several weeks, and after my return was confined to the house with an inflammatory sore throat, or I should have written long before this. Mr Clark leaves us tomorrow, for Washington, and Georgetown. his Sister and Uncle reside there, and he will be absent more than a...
It seems an age, since I have written, or heard from you, and I cannot allow another post to pass, without writing. I begin to fear that some of my letters to you have miscarried, as I have lost several, very lately, owing to the negligence of the Boston postmaster. Caroline, with her husband, Child and Cousin, have been with us nearly a fortnight, the babe, is a beautiful little creature, and...
I have written three times to my Dear Mother since I received a line from her. A letter from Mrs Smith, to Caroline, this morning, informed me, that you, and Aunt Nancy, had been passing some time, at the Valley. I was rejoiced to hear, my beloved Mother, that you were so well, as to be from home, but I do most sincerely wish, I could hear from you more frequently: it is almost three months...
I recieved your very kind letter, this morning, and hasten to acknowledge it; from Mr Clark, I heard last week, his health is entirely reestablished, but he was prevented leaving Maryland by the Ice, which renders the navigation very difficult, indeed it has been entirely closed for the last two months; I hope however by this time, the fetters, which have surrounded him are dissolved, and he...
I received your letter of Feb’ry 19th inst, was rejoiced to find you writing again. It was my intention Sooner to have replied to you, but your own experience under Similar Circumstances will allow for my omission, when I inform you that Louisa was Suddenly seizd with bleading, like that which has twice attackd you, and this from being a large vessel in the Stomack, was so profuse, as to...
I received your letter my Dear Mother by this mornings Mail, and hasten to answer your enquiries: I believe I did not say, Mr Clark had nothing ; his pay as a Lieutenant, is 400 dollars a year; and he has between two and three thousand, in the bank at Washington; if we go to house keeping, it is probable I shall have decent furniture at least, given me, yesterday, we dined at Mr Boylston’s, in...
Susan has written you, I Suppose that mr Clark has returnd, and that he is very desirious of being married. She has also informd you of his income and means of Support. Will you under these Circumstances consent to their being married at present? They are Young, neither of them disposed to Habits of dissipation, but Such limited means I fear will involve them in difficulties. To keep House...
The account of your Health and your debility gives me much concern. the frequent bleedings your Physician thinks Proper for you, quite allarms me. I am sure Louisa could not have Survived, if any blood had been taken from her. for more than a month, She could not rise from her Bed: to Sit while it was made, without fainting, and looking as if she could not be yet back alive. She has now So far...
When I received your Letter of the 8th, written upon a Sunday, for which you apologize, it brought to my mind a Letter I once read written upon a Sunday morning by the Revd dr Mayhew of Boston, to mr James otis, respecting Some secular affairs of importance. he began his Letter with these Words—“To a good man all time is holy, and none too holy, to do good.” I think you may have absolution...
This Evening my dear Daughter, will give you a Son, and me a Grandson, whom I have no doubt will prove himself worthy that Relation—He has plead So hard, and appeard so anxious and distrest, that it Should be so, before he again went abroad that I could no longer withhold my assent, and hav Susans Grandfather also joind with me, altho my former objections Still remained the Same. Tomorrow they...
It has been much longer since I wrote to you than I intended. The opportunities by which I have sent letters to dear Susan have been unexpected and sometimes I have scarcely had time to write to her; and I know that she would always inform you and my other friends of my situation. I wrote to her the other day by a vessel going to the rock of Gibralter. My health has very much improved...
I thank you for your kind Letter of the 16th. I rejoice to hear of your comfortable health and eligible situation—I hear that most pleasing accounts of Mr Johnson and his Lady, and of all their Children A high gratification to me; And a foundation of an Ardent hope, That, that Branch of my Posterity will be useful members of Society, and consequently, consolations to their Parents; and...
I thank you for your kind letter of the 16th I rejoice to hear of your comfortable Health—and eligible situation—I hear the most pleasing accounts of Mr Johnson and his Lady—and of all her Children—a high gratification to me—and a foundation of an Ardent hope—that, that Branch of my posterity will be useful members of Society, and consequently consolations to their Parents, and examples and...